Wind energy its potential in india

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  • Wind Potential varies with height, our govt will improve current carry capacity and can save Energy.
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  • Wind energy potential is far greater than other competitive renewable sources.
  • Available wind potential today is more than 4 times the current installed capacity
  • Available wind potential today is more than 4 times the current installed capacity
  • Available wind potential today is more than 4 times the current installed capacity
  • Available wind potential today is more than 4 times the current installed capacity
  • Available wind potential today is more than 4 times the current installed capacity
  • Available wind potential today is more than 4 times the current installed capacity
  • Available wind potential today is more than 4 times the current installed capacity
  • Wind energy its potential in india

    1. 1. Wind energy- Its potential in India<br />Palas Kumar Farsoiya<br />B.E (chemical) 4th Year<br />
    2. 2. Power scenario<br />Why do we need Wind energy?<br />Wind energy potential in India<br />Wind energy installed capacity<br />Ambitions<br />How to achieve it?<br />Conclusion<br />Agenda….<br />
    3. 3. India energy - facts<br />India - one of the fastest growing economies in the world. It is poised to grow at around 7 percent on moderate term.<br />India’s Energy Consumption is 12.6 million btu.<br />India energy intensity is higher compared to Japan, USA and Asia as a whole by 3.7, 1.55 and 1.47 times respectively (energy consumption compared to GDP). This indicates inefficient use of energy but also substantial scope of energy savings.<br />
    4. 4. Long term energy plan<br />
    5. 5. Renewable energy in India : History <br />Government of India recognized the enormous potential of Renewable<br />Energy for national development and created the following organizations:<br /><ul><li>Commissioyn for Additional Sources of Energy (CASE) was established as early as 1981.
    6. 6. Ministry of New and Renewable Energy Sources (MNRES) established in 1992 with special focus on Non conventional Energy sources.
    7. 7. Each state has its own set up to support activities like GEDA, MEDA, KREDAL, etc.
    8. 8. India is the first country which has set up separate ministry for New and Renewable Energy Sources </li></li></ul><li>Global status….<br />Source: REN21 global status report 2010<br />
    9. 9. POWER MIX…. <br />In MW<br />Source: ministry of power (India)<br />
    10. 10. Why wind energy ?<br />Wind energy projects offer good commercial value and size advantage<br />Wind energy is pollution free and nature friendly<br />Wind energy has very good potential and it is the fastest growing energy source<br />The future looks bright for wind energy because technology is becoming more advanced and windmills are becoming more efficient<br />
    11. 11. Why wind energy ?<br /><ul><li>Imperatives for Renewable Energies
    12. 12. Sustenance of energy demand can’t be achieved through fossil fuel as the limited reserves are fast depleting (vers abundant supplies of sun shine ,water and garbage)
    13. 13. Global warming and Clean Development drive forcing countries to reduce polluting industries
    14. 14. Carbon Credits encouraging companies to go in for captive renewable energy investments </li></li></ul><li>Wind energy Potential<br />MW<br />Source: MNRE<br />
    15. 15. Installed capacity<br />10240MW<br />
    16. 16. 650 stations spread over 27 States in the country<br />The (MNRE), Govt. of India has established a Centre for Wind Energy Technology at Chennai<br />225 Wind Monitoring stations have indicated wind power density more than 200 W/m2 at 50 m above ground level.<br />Kayathar, Tamil Nadu<br />
    17. 17. Potential Relook<br /> Potential of 45000 MW is being looked again in light of <br /><ul><li>The past wind data available at 25 meter hub height and the estimate was done by a committee in 1998
    18. 18. Current trend of introducing higher hub heights (75, 85 & 90 meters) resulting in higher generation potential
    19. 19. Many areas have been successfully developed as potential sites in the states of Karnataka, Gujarat, Rajasthan & Andhra Pradesh
    20. 20. Few more states other than 8 states presently mapped are also being explored by C-WET (Centre for Wind Energy Technology – a government undertaking) as well as private Wind energy players</li></li></ul><li>Installed capacity<br />Tamilnadu<br /><ul><li>Tamil Nadu has the most wind power generating capacity : 4900 MW
    21. 21. Not far from Aralvaymoli, the Muppandal wind farm, the largest in the subcontinent
    22. 22. The village had been selected as the showcase for India's $2 billion clean energy program
    23. 23. In Tamil Nadu, Coimbatore and Tiruppur Districts having more wind Mills from 2002 onwards</li></li></ul><li>Generating capacity of 1942 MW<br />Suzlon operates what was once Asia's largest wind farm<br />The Vankusawade Wind Park (201 MW), near the Koyna reservoir in Satara district of Maharashtra.<br />Maharastra<br />
    24. 24. Generating capacity of 1782 MW<br />Samana & sadodar in jamanagar district is set to host energy companies like China Light Power (CLP) and Tata Power <br />ONGC Ltd has commissioned its first wind power project<br />Gujarat<br />
    25. 25. Samana, Gujarat- Tata Power<br />
    26. 26. Generating capacity of 1340.23 MW<br />The 13.2 MW Arasinagundi (ARA) and 16.5 MW Anaburu (ANA) wind farms are ACCIONA’S first in India.<br />ACCIONA is in talks with the World Bank for The Spanish Carbon Fund which is assessing participation in the project as buyer for CERs likely to arise between 2010 and 2012.<br />Karnataka <br />
    27. 27. Rajasthan- 738.5 MW<br />Madhya Pradesh – 212.8 MW<br />Kerala – 26.5 MW<br />West Bengal – 1.10 MW<br />Other states<br />
    28. 28. Ambitions<br />“ We are going to add at least 2000 MW annually ”<br />
    29. 29. Short term goals<br />
    30. 30. How we are going to achieve it ?<br />Major wind turbine manufacturers in India<br />-Suzlon, Vestas, GE, Enercon, Acciona etc<br />Component manufacturing expertise base.<br />Large availability of wind resources<br />Long coastline for offshore wind energy potential<br />Government subsidized incentives for wind energy distributors<br />Nationwide grid<br />Growing demand for energy that is not met by conventional energy sources.<br />
    31. 31. Required <br />Require low wind speed turbines, class 3 or lower (5.5-7.5m/s)<br />Therefore large rotors with adequate controls.<br />Most of the current machines installed are below 1 MW. Require to install 1.0 to 3.0 MW machines <br />Design to site specific conditions<br />Grid compatibility/power plant capabilities are essential<br />
    32. 32. Challenges… <br /><ul><li>Optimal pricing of power generated from the renewable energy sources
    33. 33. Quality and consistency issue of renewable power arising from the intermittent nature of electricity from wind and small hydropower,
    34. 34. The costs of technology development and production need to be reduced significantly from current levels
    35. 35. Availability of financing especially project finance for Renewable
    36. 36. Creditworthiness of counterparties has posed challenges
    37. 37. Slow pace of rural electrification and pace of reforms in the rural electricity sector</li></li></ul><li>An initiative by SBI <br /><ul><li>State Bank of India has set up wind farm project for 15 MW, covering TN, Gujarat and Maharashtra , for captive consumption
    38. 38. Besides, SBI will be eligible now to get carbon credit also due to its clean energy initiative
    39. 39. Suzlon Energy was the supplier of wind turbines for this project which was completed in 4 months .
    40. 40. As a corporate social initiative for clean energy drive this is the first initiative in the country
    41. 41. This sets a new trend in terms of clean energy projects in India and more corporates may follow the footsteps of SBI
    42. 42. Optimal pricing of power generated from the renewable energy sources
    43. 43. Quality and consistency issue of renewable power arising from the intermittent nature of electricity from wind and small hydropower,
    44. 44. The costs of technology development and production need to be reduced significantly from current levels
    45. 45. Availability of financing especially project finance for Renewable
    46. 46. Creditworthiness of counterparties has posed challenges
    47. 47. Slow pace of rural electrification and pace of reforms in the rural electricity sector</li></li></ul><li>A Comparison <br /><ul><li>Optimal pricing of power generated from the renewable energy sources
    48. 48. Quality and consistency issue of renewable power arising from the intermittent nature of electricity from wind and small hydropower,
    49. 49. The costs of technology development and production need to be reduced significantly from current levels
    50. 50. Availability of financing especially project finance for Renewable
    51. 51. Creditworthiness of counterparties has posed challenges
    52. 52. Slow pace of rural electrification and pace of reforms in the rural electricity sector</li></li></ul><li>Conclusion <br />20 % production penetration by 2020 in India is an ambitious goal.<br />A coherent national policy for wind energy which includes interstate grid availability and preferably with generation based incentives.<br />Accurate wind assessment and siting needs to be performed at 100m+ hub heights across India and offshore.<br />Larger MW-sized reliable wind turbines with large rotors and advanced controls required for low wind sites and grid integration<br />Grid integration is absolutely essential, along with adequate wind farm controls.<br />Increased large scale grid capacity, integrated power systems and Micro grids/Virtual power plants in smaller areas needs development.<br />Wind energy projects offer good commercial value and size advantage<br />Wind energy is pollution free and nature friendly<br />Wind energy has very good potential and it is the fastest growing energy source<br />The future looks bright for wind energy because technology is becoming more advanced and windmills are becoming more efficient<br />
    53. 53. India emerging leader in wind energy : A report by NDTV<br /><ul><li>Optimal pricing of power generated from the renewable energy sources
    54. 54. Quality and consistency issue of renewable power arising from the intermittent nature of electricity from wind and small hydropower,
    55. 55. The costs of technology development and production need to be reduced significantly from current levels
    56. 56. Availability of financing especially project finance for Renewable
    57. 57. Creditworthiness of counterparties has posed challenges
    58. 58. Slow pace of rural electrification and pace of reforms in the rural electricity sector</li></li></ul><li>References <br />
    59. 59. Thank you for your attention<br />

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