GOVATAR   How do you represent yourself on the Web and Virtual Communities? Guidelines for Employees Participating in Web ...
Questions <ul><li>What does it mean to represent, speak for, or even answer questions on behalf of EPA? </li></ul><ul><li>...
What are you talking about? <ul><li>The new EPA homepage, and the 'bookmarking' selection, brings up the issue of ID manag...
Survey of the Knowledge Networking Group <ul><li>Questions were posed last week to my KN group on LinkedIn, GovLoop  and o...
Comments from Colleagues <ul><li>City Engineer - Director of Public Works - City of LaSalle, Illinois </li></ul><ul><li>Be...
Comments from Colleagues <ul><li>Sr. Technology Advisor for Public Diplomacy When I first began exploring social media I t...
Comments from Colleagues <ul><li>Chief Technology Officer - Australia  Speaking from experience with Second Life - it is h...
  [Music Playing “Who Are You? – The Who”]   Web 2.0 Sites [Music Playing “Who Are You? – The Who”]
Web 2.0 Sites
Web 2.0 Sites
Web 2.0 Sites
Web 3D Sites
Discussion <ul><li>The Song is Over… (not) </li></ul><ul><li>[Music Playing “The Song is Over” – The Who] </li></ul>
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Govatar - How Do You Present Yourself?

918 views

Published on

Presentation given at the 2008 EPA Web Workgroup Conference in Seattle

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
918
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Govatar - How Do You Present Yourself?

  1. 1. GOVATAR How do you represent yourself on the Web and Virtual Communities? Guidelines for Employees Participating in Web 2.0 and Virtual Worlds [Music Playing “Won’t Get Fooled Again – The Who”]
  2. 2. Questions <ul><li>What does it mean to represent, speak for, or even answer questions on behalf of EPA? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the differences, if any, between doing so in the real world and the virtual? </li></ul>
  3. 3. What are you talking about? <ul><li>The new EPA homepage, and the 'bookmarking' selection, brings up the issue of ID management on Digg, among others, which can lead to a 'community' of Diggsters which share and discuss links (environmental or otherwise) with each other. </li></ul><ul><li>We are 'coming out' as individuals, and as EPA'ers by participating in these global groups. The rank and file in our agency should give consideration and care to the implications and responsibilities. </li></ul><ul><li>This presentation shares what we have discovered about this slippery slope. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Survey of the Knowledge Networking Group <ul><li>Questions were posed last week to my KN group on LinkedIn, GovLoop and other sites . </li></ul><ul><li>At our agency's web conference next week, I am leading a discussion of how to best participate in all the collaboration venues we have now. All the networks, like Ning.com and LinkedIn.com, and the virtual world communities, like Second Life give us more and more opportunities for collaboration and participation in meetings, forums and other events. </li></ul><ul><li>Does you agency or company have guidelines for you to follow? </li></ul><ul><li>Are there restrictions on your participation? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the differences for official representatives of an organization, and those of us who have interest, even as part of our mission, in events where we are not the 'spokesperson'? </li></ul><ul><li>How do you identify yourself in the Social and Business Web 2.0 sites, like FaceBook, LinkedIn, MySpace, Digg, Deli.cio.us and others? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you use different images or photos when avatars or icons are requested? </li></ul><ul><li>When do you use your work email address and when do you use personal email? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you identify your agency in discussions? </li></ul><ul><li>Special cautions taken during Election Campaigns, like now? </li></ul><ul><li>I would greatly appreciate any and all discussion of this by any of our members, please forward to your colleagues. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Comments from Colleagues <ul><li>City Engineer - Director of Public Works - City of LaSalle, Illinois </li></ul><ul><li>Because we are a small municipality (about 10,000), I have fewer restrictions than someone at a larger city would have. We should have written policies and guidelines but still do not for many of the things we do including use of the Internet. I would suspect most small cities are similar. The only restriction on my participation is really my time. I also have to make sure that anything I am involved with during working hours is related to work. I usually indicate where I work in all networks that I join. My job is a big part of who I am so leaving out that information would create an incomplete profile. Of course, because I do identify where I work, I try to keep that in mind as I participate online because I don't want to do anything that would reflect negatively on my city. Also, I don't want to do anything that would reflect negatively on the engineering profession. I primarily use my Second Life avatar for any image requested because there are few photos of just me that are close up enough to be used for a profile image and because the Second Life images are so convenient. I use my work email when I am signing up for something directly related to my position with the city. Otherwise I use one of my personal emails. Sometimes I identify the city I work for but usually only if there is a need to and it is relevant to the discussion. Unfortunately it seems like I am exposed to and have to deal with politics at all levels throughout my entire day. Because of this, I tend to remain politically neutral online no matter if it is during an election year or not. The only exception I have made in this has been to openly support the &quot;Save our Parks&quot; petition in our state. This movement is a direct grassroots effort against the actions of our governor. When I indicated my support, I did so with an explanation of why I was openly supporting this effort as the city engineer/director of public works for a city in Illinois so people would understand. And by the way, I like the govatar term you used! It does remind me of another discussion point related to using avatars in virtual worlds. When I initially joined Second Life, I did so for the sole purpose of setting up a site to offer information about our city. So because the avatar I created was to be the Second Life representative for the city, I found myself feeling uncomfortable going places in Second Life that someone might think would be inappropriate for a city representative. Now it wasn't any place crazy - I was just worried about having someone seeing me dancing somewhere and thinking why is a city avatar dancing at a Second Life club. So i decided my city avatar is to be used solely for city business, and I made others for general exploring. I know a few others who have done something similar. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Comments from Colleagues <ul><li>Sr. Technology Advisor for Public Diplomacy When I first began exploring social media I thought you should develop separate professional and personal profiles regardless if it is a social network, virtual world or other site. After spending a significant time in world, I believe that your avatar and even your profiles are extensions of you. In real life you do not ask me to split myself in two between my professional self and my personal self. They are all part of who I am. I just select what view of me you should be seeing when I interact with you. For my professional life I wear a suit, don't tell the wrong jokes and spend more time talking technology than about the great new wine I found. The same should be true in our virtual or online lives. Why can't we be one person, one profile and one avatar? Not to mention the pain of having to maintain multiple accounts, with multiple names, emails etc.! Make it stop!!!! OpenID and maybe OpenProfile? here I come! My point is yes you may know I like red wine and am certified in Pilates, but if I only talk to you about my professional life, prove I am knowledgeable and if I am in avatar form show up in professional attair why should you care about the other &quot;me&quot;s you might be able to see? Would this change your opinion of me? Maybe it depends on what you see/read? Ultimately, people should think about the fact that people will judge you on what they read in your profile. If you don't want this or think it may be distracting or perhaps a negative influence on your professional life then maybe you do need two profiles/avatars. But to automatically rule you need two identities I don't think is the answer either. Now, that the philosophical part of me has been satisfied let me attempt to answer your questions: </li></ul><ul><li>1) My agency currently does not have a policy for or against the use of a personal profile or avatar. We are in the process of developing our Social Media policy. We do insist that if you are creating a presence for your organization that you clearly state who you are, which agency you represent, link to the main agency website and potentially the agency's other social media sites. We also require you use a generic admin account to create these sites in order to allow for seamless administration of the site. </li></ul><ul><li>2 & 3) Public Diplomacy requires us to be transparent about who we are (that we work for the U.S Government) and what our intentions are when we engage people in discussions. These facts are stated clearly in our user profiles. We can hold casual conversations, but are clear these discussions are only our personal opinions. When we produce an event or give a speech we obtain clearance through our Public Affairs Office. We view holding an event, producing materials or speaking to an audience online is the same as if you conducted these actions in real life. Therefore, the rules regarding publishing documents and public speaking from our Public Affairs office apply. </li></ul><ul><li>4) I have been using my personal profile. I don't have anything that I feel would be objectionable on my Facebook site. This is a mix of personal, professional and professional networking for me outside of the government. LinkedIn is my strictly my professional self. Both Facebook and LinkedIn have been key resources for my work at the Department when I have needed contacts or expertise not readily found in my local government networks. Both networks help me maintain communications and professional networks beyond what I could hope to accomplish via email or phone. All of these sites have my personal email accounts attached to them. For the most part I use my personal information and personal profile unless there is a specific reason someone needs to recognize I am from the U.S Government. When in my professional capacity or when I am using my personal profile for professional purposes I add the language about me working for the Government to my profile and add the necessary disclaimers. The same applies for my avatar in SL. I use one avatar, but her profile clearly identifies her as a USG employee from the Department of State. We provide in world and real world contact information for people in SL. We tend to use a generic central email address (.gov) in order to show we really are from the U.S Government and also to allow us the ability to have multiple people manage the incoming messages. We will also disclose our individual government email addresses. We do not use personal email addresses unless it is a strictly personal communication. </li></ul><ul><li>5) I use a number of different profile pictures depending on what site i am on. Sometimes I use a real picture of me. Sometimes an avatar picture. I try to ensure the pictures I use display me in a positive way. The only thing I would think would be off limits would be a photo that is too sexually suggestive (ummmm...if using for work do you really want to look like you are on a dating site?). I would say pretty much anything else goes. Artistic is interesting. Graphics are cool. Avatars are great when you are in the club. When all else fails not providing some kind of graphic, symbol, or picture tends to be more disturbing than providing one. People like to put a name with a &quot;face&quot;. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Comments from Colleagues <ul><li>Chief Technology Officer - Australia Speaking from experience with Second Life - it is hard to distance yourself from some situations in-world and is far to distracting a place to mix business with exploring or collaborating - I have has some bizarre experience in the public sand-pit which I would struggle to explain to clients, even is public land unless you completely lock it down, anybody can come along and do anything. Most serious business entities on Second Life have private servers and are in full control (IBM, BMW, DELL), these servers are invite only. At a recent conference in Second Life held by the ABC in Australia, the rules stated no &quot;attaching of scripted objects&quot; which can lead to all sorts of trouble - see http://valleywag.com/tech/avatars-in-the-news/a-guide-to-anshe-chung-226519.php - so any public event will need to be managed. So I keep my SL alter-ego separate to my RL identity. Plus in SL you are forced to take a surname - so unless it's a match, you will always be somebody else - Unless LL can set-up up a custom surname $$. As for identities - I have several networks I belong to - I think it really does not matter if the are all called different things (names, blogs, feeds etc) as long as you offer a unified point to see them all - so FriendFeed is perfect for that ( http://www.friendfeed.com/martino ), amongst other similar services (lifestream, plaxo, pownce etc). Where possible appear as a business and do all communication in that space (Facebook has companies as do most Social Networks) - Have employees control their privacy settings and filter all work - contacts into it, setting ruls as to what they can see. As for social bookmarking - set up networks for the &quot;company&quot; and again watch the setting to control access to personal bookmarks and content. It will come down to the individual knowing what filters to apply to what relationships. With a granular degree of control you can be very precise indeed. See this story for a very funny FaceBook incident that happened a few days ago here in Australia. </li></ul>
  8. 8. [Music Playing “Who Are You? – The Who”] Web 2.0 Sites [Music Playing “Who Are You? – The Who”]
  9. 9. Web 2.0 Sites
  10. 10. Web 2.0 Sites
  11. 11. Web 2.0 Sites
  12. 12. Web 3D Sites
  13. 13. Discussion <ul><li>The Song is Over… (not) </li></ul><ul><li>[Music Playing “The Song is Over” – The Who] </li></ul>

×