Introduction to Waves and Waveforms An interactive presentation by: Brian Farlow ED205.02 Exit
Main Menu <ul><li>What is a wave? </li></ul><ul><li>Types of waves </li></ul><ul><li>Waveforms </li></ul><ul><li>Still to ...
What is a wave? <ul><li>A wave is the transmission of energy through space and time cause by a disturbance in space.  Ever...
Types of Waves <ul><li>There are three types of waves that physicists study.  Click on the links below to learn more about...
Waveforms <ul><li>Waves travel in two different forms: </li></ul><ul><li>Transverse waves are waves in which the energy th...
Still To Come <ul><li>We’ve only just begun to talk about waves.  Here are some things still to come: </li></ul><ul><li>Pa...
Citations <ul><li>Wave information verified from: </li></ul><ul><li>Halliday, David, Robert Resnick, and Jearl Walker.  Fu...
About the author <ul><li>I am Brian Farlow and am currently a physics major/mathematics minor seeking secondary teaching c...
Concept Map Exit
Mechanical Waves <ul><li>Mechanical waves are the most familiar type of waves to us because they can be most readily seen ...
Electromagnetic Waves <ul><li>While waves of this type are not as easy to see in action as mechanical waves, we use them d...
Electromagnetic Waves Video Clip Click on the movie to begin playback. Exit Back
Matter Waves <ul><li>Matter waves are a phenomenon studied in modern physics involving the oscillation of elementary parti...
Transverse Waves <ul><li>As was said previously, a transverse wave is one in which the direction of oscillation is perpend...
Longitudinal Waves <ul><li>Longitudinal waves are more difficult to explain because they are harder to see in everyday lif...
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Introduction to Waves and Waveforms

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An interactive PPT developed for an education class about very basic information on waves and waveforms.

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Introduction to Waves and Waveforms

  1. 1. Introduction to Waves and Waveforms An interactive presentation by: Brian Farlow ED205.02 Exit
  2. 2. Main Menu <ul><li>What is a wave? </li></ul><ul><li>Types of waves </li></ul><ul><li>Waveforms </li></ul><ul><li>Still to Come </li></ul><ul><li>Citations </li></ul><ul><li>About the author </li></ul><ul><li>Concept map </li></ul>http:// en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Wave_packet.svg Exit
  3. 3. What is a wave? <ul><li>A wave is the transmission of energy through space and time cause by a disturbance in space. Everyone has seen an example of this when you have wiggled an end of a string up and down. But, for those who might need an illustration, check out this website: </li></ul><ul><li>http://phet.colorado.edu/sims/string-wave/string-wave.swf . By wiggling the wrench up and down you create a disturbance. You then can see the energy from the disturbance transmitted along the string. Keep this illustration in mind, because it’s the big idea behind waves. </li></ul>Exit
  4. 4. Types of Waves <ul><li>There are three types of waves that physicists study. Click on the links below to learn more about each type. </li></ul><ul><li>Mechanical Waves , Electromagnetic Waves , Matter Waves </li></ul>Exit
  5. 5. Waveforms <ul><li>Waves travel in two different forms: </li></ul><ul><li>Transverse waves are waves in which the energy that is transmitted oscillates perpendicular to the direction the wave is traveling. </li></ul><ul><li>Longitudinal waves are waves in which the energy that is transmitted oscillates parallel to the direction the wave is traveling. </li></ul><ul><li>Learn More: transverse waves , longitudinal waves </li></ul>Exit
  6. 6. Still To Come <ul><li>We’ve only just begun to talk about waves. Here are some things still to come: </li></ul><ul><li>Parts of wave </li></ul><ul><li>Frequency and wavelength </li></ul><ul><li>Wave speed </li></ul><ul><li>Superposition of waves </li></ul><ul><li>Wave interference </li></ul><ul><li>And more… </li></ul>Exit
  7. 7. Citations <ul><li>Wave information verified from: </li></ul><ul><li>Halliday, David, Robert Resnick, and Jearl Walker. Fundamentals of Physics . 7 th Ed, Wiley. Hoboken, NJ. 2005. </li></ul><ul><li>All pictures and videos (website cited with each) were downloaded on 6/10/08 </li></ul><ul><li>Electromagnetic waves video: </li></ul><ul><li>Elements of Physics: Waves: Sound and Electromagnetism. United Learning. 2006. unitedstreaming. 10 June 2008 http:// streaming.discoveryeducation.com / </li></ul>Exit
  8. 8. About the author <ul><li>I am Brian Farlow and am currently a physics major/mathematics minor seeking secondary teaching certification in both at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Michigan. I hope to have that completed by the winter of 2010. When I’m not swamped with that you could find me playing football, basketball, working out, watching movies or tv, reading, listening to music, or volunteering my time at my church with the youth group. I hope you enjoyed this interactive powerpoint. If you have any questions feel free to email me at [email_address] . </li></ul>Exit
  9. 9. Concept Map Exit
  10. 10. Mechanical Waves <ul><li>Mechanical waves are the most familiar type of waves to us because they can be most readily seen in action. They also have the following properties: </li></ul><ul><li>Mechanical waves must have a material to travel through (known as a medium). This can be water, air, dirt, basically anything made of matter. </li></ul><ul><li>Mechanical waves are governed by Newton’s Laws. </li></ul><ul><li>Water waves and sound waves are examples of mechanical waves. </li></ul>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:2006-01-14_Surface_waves.jpg Back Exit
  11. 11. Electromagnetic Waves <ul><li>While waves of this type are not as easy to see in action as mechanical waves, we use them daily. Light travels as electromagnetic waves, and the common microwave oven uses electromagnetic waves to cook food. Electromagnetic waves differ from mechanical waves in that they require no medium to exist or travel. </li></ul><ul><li>This link will take you to a video that explains electromagnetic waves in much more detail: </li></ul>http:// science.hq.nasa.gov/kids/imagers/ems/index.html Back Exit EM Waves Video Clip
  12. 12. Electromagnetic Waves Video Clip Click on the movie to begin playback. Exit Back
  13. 13. Matter Waves <ul><li>Matter waves are a phenomenon studied in modern physics involving the oscillation of elementary particles in space. We will focus our attention on mechanical and electromagnetic waves and leave the study of matter waves for quantum mechanics. </li></ul>Back Exit
  14. 14. Transverse Waves <ul><li>As was said previously, a transverse wave is one in which the direction of oscillation is perpendicular to the direction of wave motion. Think back to the wave-on-a-string applet you played with earlier. In that you could see that the disturbance was causing the string to move up and down while the disturbance itself was moving right to left. That is a transverse wave. Some examples of transverse waves are: </li></ul><ul><li>wave on a string </li></ul><ul><li>Water waves </li></ul><ul><li>Light and all other EM waves </li></ul>http://www.pics4learning.com/details.php?img=p1060311.jpg Exit Almost all of us have even participated in a transverse wave. Don’t believe it? Check it out: http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v =cPKGa2DsIs0 Back
  15. 15. Longitudinal Waves <ul><li>Longitudinal waves are more difficult to explain because they are harder to see in everyday life. Their oscillations occur in the same direction as the wave is traveling. Sound is a common example of a longitudinal wave. With sound, a vibration pushes on the air molecules surrounding it, which in turn push on the air molecules surrounding them. This causes a chain reaction of vibrating molecules that will eventually reach the ear and be perceived as sound. To get a better visual of this, as well as a comparison between longitudinal and transverse waves, watch this video: </li></ul><ul><li>http:// www.teachertube.com/view_video.php?viewkey =db85fc94ffa4204146aa </li></ul>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Budapest_Symphony_Orchestra.jpg Exit Back For another neat longitudinal wave example, check out: http:// www.teachertube.com/view_video.php?viewkey =4806731fdaa64351fa7a

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