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Fatima Alsaiari



                                                             The English Translating Text of the Arabic...
Fatima Alsaiari




                                                                            Practicum in Translation
 ...
Fatima Alsaiari



                                              In the third day, they said to the merchant’s son: “go an...
Fatima Alsaiari



‫[ التعليق‬d27]: for        deported him out the country in order to no one be fascinated by him. After...
‫‪Fatima Alsaiari‬‬




                                         ‫قصة ابن الملك وأصحابه‬
 ‫صػّٛا أْ أستؼح ٔفش اصطحثٛا فٟ غ...
‫‪Fatima Alsaiari‬‬



    ‫فٍّا واْ اٌ١َٛ اٌشاتغ لاٌٛا التٓ اٌٍّه: أطٍك أٔد ٚاورغة ٌٕا تمعائه ٚلذسن. فأطٍك اتٓ اٌٍّه حر...
Fatima Alsaiari



                                                      The Arabic Translating Text of the English Short ...
‫‪Fatima Alsaiari‬‬




                                                                            ‫‪Practicum in Transla...
‫‪Fatima Alsaiari‬‬




                                                                         ‫2‬
                     ...
‫‪Fatima Alsaiari‬‬



                                             ‫"أليست رائعة؟ّ " قال الوزير العجوز والخادم اللذان سبق...
‫‪Fatima Alsaiari‬‬



‫قدم :]24‪ [d‬التعليق‬                    ‫تقدم اإلمبراطور في موكب رائع، وكل من رآه في الطريق أو من...
Fatima Alsaiari




                     The Emperor's New Suit
                               Hans Christian Andersen
Man...
Fatima Alsaiari



come near, and asked him if he did not admire the exquisite pattern and the
beautiful colours, pointing...
Fatima Alsaiari



    "What is this?" thought the emperor, "I do not see anything at all. That is
terrible! Am I stupid? ...
Fatima Alsaiari



   "I am ready," said the emperor. "Does not my suit fit me marvellously?" Then
he turned once more to ...
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Translate and Edit Short Stories

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Translate and Edit Short Stories

  1. 1. Fatima Alsaiari The English Translating Text of the Arabic Short Story ٗ‫اتٓ اٌٍّه ٚأصذلائ‬ ‫ِٓ لصص وٍ١ٍح ٚدِٕح التٓ اٌّمفغ‬ ‫[ التعليق‬d1]: English (spelling mistake) translation by:The Englis ‫[ التعليق‬d2]: Translation Fatima Amer Alsaiari 0879008 Editing by: Basmah Mahdi AL-Bogami 0879474 Instructor: Dr. Shadia Banjar 1
  2. 2. Fatima Alsaiari Practicum in Translation 462 The King’s son and his friends Once upon a time, there were four boys who walked together. The first one was a king’s ‫[ التعليق‬d3]: repetition son, the second one was a merchant’s son, the third was a sheriff’s son and he was very handsome, and the forth was plowman’s son. They were in wasteland where no food or water and they were very tired and have nothing except their clothes on their bodies. While they were walking, they were thinking in the situation they forced to face and every one was thinking according to his lifestyle. The king’s son said: “what happened in our whole life is just a destiny and what was written for anyone in the sky will come for him, he should be patient and in waiting for his destiny and that is the best thing anybody should do”. ‫[ التعليق‬d4]: God capital (g) The merchant’s son said: “the intelligence and well-thinking is the best thing that god gave us ”, and sheriff’s son said: “ the beauty is better than anything you said”. Then, the plowman’s son said: “nothing in the life is better than working hard for yourself’. When ‫[ التعليق‬d5]: arrived to a city called they arrived city called Matroun, they sat down and started to consult each other. After ‫[ التعليق‬d6]: There is no need to use the that, they said to the plowman’s son: “go and work hard to gain us some food for us in word “us “here it will be better if it is omitted this day”. He went and started to look for work to get food for his friends, the people in ‫[ التعليق‬d7]: rewrite this city told him that is never in this land better to work in than the firewood. The plowman’s son went and gather one ton of firewood, and sold it with one dirham, then he bought some food for his friend and wrote upon the city gate: “if you work hard in one day you will get a dirham”. Then he went to his friends with the food. In the second day, they said to the one who said the beauty is the best thing in life: “it is your day, you should go and buy us some food for this day”. The sheriff’s son went to the town, and said to himself: “I don’t know how to work well in any thing, so why I should go ‫[ التعليق‬d8]: spelling ( back) there?” then he felt shame to come beck to his friends without any food in his hands and ‫[ التعليق‬d9]: until he fall a sleep planned to depart them. After that he reposed under a large tree until fall asleep. A noble man in the town passed by him and admired him. He felt that this boy looks like a sheriff ‫[ التعليق‬d10]: five(spelling mistake) and felt sorry about him, then he gave him fife thousands dirhams. The sheriff’s son ‫[ التعليق‬d11]: five wrote upon the town’s gate: “the beauty of one day is equal fife thousands dirhams” then ‫[ التعليق‬d12]: then he came came back to his friends. 2
  3. 3. Fatima Alsaiari In the third day, they said to the merchant’s son: “go and bring us some food by your ‫[ التعليق‬d13]: although the meaning of intelligence and business”. He went to the town and watched merchant ships arrived the the word correct I prefer using the word ''trades'' instead of the word'' business'' port, and the merchants wanted to buy what the goods the ships have. They sat down ‫[ التعليق‬d14]: ships arrived (at)the port and started to consult each other in the side of the port, and said to each other: “we ‫[ التعليق‬d15]: this sentence should be won’t buy any thing this day from them until they cheapen the goods, even we need it”. rewrite The merchant’s son cross the road and went to the owners of the ships, then bought the ‫[ التعليق‬d16]: even though we need it goods with one hundred dinars as a debt, and showed them that he want to transfer his goods to another town. When the other merchants heard that, they felt fear if this goods go away from their hands, and gave him double of this one hundred. Then he came back to his friends with money after he wrote upon the gate: “intelligence of one day gives you one hundred dirhams”. In the forth day, they said to the king’s son: “go and get us some money with what you ‫[ التعليق‬d17]: arrived at the city’s gate believe about destiny”. He walked until he arrived city’s gate and sat down there. In this ‫[ التعليق‬d18]: did moment, the king of this land, who was not have children or any relatives, died. The people were carrying the king’s funeral and every one is sad except our friend the king’s ‫[ التعليق‬d19]: this sentence need to be son. They deprecated him, the gatekeeper cursed him and said to him: “who are you?, rewrite why are you sitting here? and even not feel sad about our king heath?”, then the ‫[ التعليق‬d20]: death gatekeeper forced him to move away from the gate. When they went, the boy returned and sat down in that place again. After that, When they came back after burying the king, the gatekeeper saw him again, got angry, and said to him: “I warned you from sitting ‫[ التعليق‬d21]: I warned you from sitting here. don’t I ?”, then he took him to the prison. In the morning of the next day, the here, Didn’t I? people of the city met and consulted who will be the king after the last dead king, and ‫[ التعليق‬d22]: it would be better to write" deceased king" instead of "the last were be really confused. The gatekeeper said to them: “ I saw a boy sitting beside the dead king". gate yesterday, he doesn’t look sad about our king death, I talked to him and he said ‫[ التعليق‬d23]: they were really confused nothing until I asked him to move away, and when I came back I saw him sitting in the ‫[ التعليق‬d24]: and I did put him in the same place, and I putting him in the prison. The noble men in the city sent someone to prison the boy to come, they asked him about who is he and why is he in this city. He told them: “ I’m the son of Fwairan king, and when my father died, my brother took the kingdom from me, I was afraid and I escaped away to protect myself until I arrived to this land”. When the boy said that, the people knew him and praised his father and his government. Then the noble men in the town chose him to be the king of the town, and carried him upon the white elephant and wandered him around the city as their custom when new king governs them. When he passed by the gate and saw what was written there he asked them to write there: “the hard work, beauty, intelligence and what happened to the man in his life whether it is good or bad, is his destiny from the God, and I became more ‫[ التعليق‬d25]: there is no need to write "the God" only the word ''God" would be honored and admired because of what the God gives me not any thing else. After that, he enough .Although I prefer to write Allah. went to his palace and brought his friends, and put the intelligent one with ministers, the ‫[ التعليق‬d26]: the sentence need to be rewrite hard worker with the farmers, and he gave the handsome one a lot of money and 3
  4. 4. Fatima Alsaiari ‫[ التعليق‬d27]: for deported him out the country in order to no one be fascinated by him. After that, the new king called all scientists and philosophers and said to them: “ you have to believe that what God gives me is because of the destiny and what was written for me before my birth, not because of beauty, intelligence or hard work. When my brother sent me away I ‫[ التعليق‬d28]: rewrite didn’t even expect to get my food not to be the king, because I thought there are many people in the world who are handsome, intelligent and work hard more than me, but my ‫[ التعليق‬d29]: an old destiny led me to this rank”. There was old man among the crowd who stood and said: ‫[ التعليق‬d30]: stood up “you speak wisely and you are here because of your wisdom, you made our hopes of you become true, we believe you and what God gave you and what you gain you deserve it, ‫[ التعليق‬d31]: rewrite and the happiest one in life who is god gives him the wisdom and well-behaving”. 4
  5. 5. ‫‪Fatima Alsaiari‬‬ ‫قصة ابن الملك وأصحابه‬ ‫صػّٛا أْ أستؼح ٔفش اصطحثٛا فٟ غش٠ك ٚاحذج، أحذُ٘ اتٓ اٌٍّه ٚاٌثأٟ اتٓ ذاجش ٚاٌثاٌث اتٓ شش٠ف رٚ‬ ‫جّاي ٚاٌشاتغ اتٓ أواس. ٚوأٛا جّ١ؼاً ِحراج١ٓ، ٚلذ أصاتُٙ ظشس ٚجٙذ شذ٠ذ فٟ ِٛظغ غشتح ال ٠ٍّىْٛ‬ ‫إال ِا ػٍ١ُٙ ِٓ اٌث١اب . فث١ّٕا ُ٘ ٠ّشْٛ إر فىشٚا فٟ أِشُ٘ ٚواْ وً إٔغاْ ُِٕٙ ساجؼاً إٌٝ غثاػٗ ِٚا‬ ‫واْ ٠أذ١ٗ ِٕٗ اٌخ١ش:‬ ‫لاي اتٓ اٌٍّه: إّٔا أِش اٌذٔ١ا وٍٗ تاٌمعاء ٚاٌمذس، ٚاٌزٞ لذس ػٍٝ اإلٔغاْ ٠أذ١ٗ ػٍٝ وً حاي، ٚاٌصثش‬ ‫ٌٍمعاء ٚاٌمذس ٚأرظاسّ٘ا أفعً األِٛس.‬ ‫ٚلاي اتٓ اٌراجش: اٌؼمً أفعً ِٓ وً شٟء.‬ ‫ٚلاي اتٓ اٌشش٠ف: اٌجّاي أفعً ِّا روشذُ.‬ ‫.‬ ‫ثُ لاي اتٓ األواس: ٌ١ظ فٟ اٌذٔ١ا أفعً ِٓ االجرٙاد فٟ اٌؼًّ‬ ‫فٍّا لشتٛا ِٓ ِذ٠ٕح ٠ماي ٌٙا ِطشْٚ، جٍغٛا فٟ ٔاح١ح ِٕٙا ٠رشاٚسْٚ: فماٌٛا التٓ األواس: أطٍك‬ ‫فاورغة ٌٕا تاجرٙادن غؼاِاً ٌ١ِٕٛا ٘زا. فأطٍك اتٓ األواس، ٚعأي ػٓ ػًّ إرا ػٍّٗ اإلٔغاْ ٠ىرغة ف١ٗ‬ ‫غؼاَ أستؼح ٔفش فؼشفٖٛ أٔٗ ٌ١ظ فٟ ذٍه اٌّذ٠ٕح شٟء أػض ِٓ اٌحطة، ٚواْ اٌحطة ِٕٙا ػٍٝ فشعخ.‬ ‫ّ‬ ‫فأطٍك اتٓ األواس فاحرطة غٕاً ِٓ اٌحطة، ٚأذٝ تٗ اٌّذ٠ٕح فثاػٗ تذسُ٘ ٚاشرشٜ تٗ غؼاِاً ٚورة ػٍٝ تاب‬ ‫اٌّذ٠ٕح: ػًّ ٠َٛ ٚاحذ إرا أجٙذ ف١ٗ اٌشجً تذٔٗ ل١ّرٗ دسُ٘. ثُ أطٍك إٌٝ أصحاتٗ تاٌطؼاَ فأوٍٛا‬ ‫. فٍّا واْ ِٓ اٌغذ: لاٌٛا ٠ٕثغٟ ٌٍزٞ لاي إٔٗ ٌ١ظ شٟء أػض ِٓ اٌجّاي أْ ذىْٛ ٔٛترٗ. فأطٍك اتٓ‬ ‫اٌشش٠ف ٌ١أذٟ اٌّذ٠ٕح، ففىش فٟ ٔفغٗ ٚلاي: أٔا ٌغد أحغٓ ػّالً فّا ٠ذخٍٕٟ اٌّذ٠ٕح؟ ثُ اعرح١ا أْ ٠شجغ‬ ‫إٌٝ أصحاتٗ تغ١ش غؼاَ، ُٚ٘ تّفاسلرُٙ. فأطٍك حرٝ أعٕذ ظٙشٖ إٌٝ شجشج ػظ١ّح، فغٍثٗ إٌَٛ فٕاَ. فّش‬ ‫ّ‬ ‫تٗ سجً ِٓ ػظّاء اٌّذ٠ٕح فشالٗ جّاٌٗ ٚذٛعُ ف١ٗ ششف إٌِّجاس فشق ٌٗ ِٕٚحٗ خّغّائح دسُ٘. فىرة‬ ‫َّ‬ ‫َّ‬ ‫ػٍٝ تاب اٌّذ٠ٕح: جّاي ٠َٛ ٚاحذ ٠غاٚٞ خّغّائح دسُ٘. ٚأذٝ تاٌذساُ٘ إٌٝ أصحاتٗ.‬ ‫فٍّا أصثحٛا فٟ اٌ١َٛ اٌثاٌث، لاٌٛا التٓ اٌراجش: أطٍك أٔد فاغٍة ٌٕا تؼمٍه ٚذجاسذه ٌ١ِٕٛا ٘زا ش١ياً.‬ ‫فأطٍك اتٓ اٌراجش فٍُ ٠ضي حرٝ تصش تغف١ٕح ِٓ عفٓ اٌثحش وث١شج اٌّراع لذ لذِد إٌٝ اٌغاحً، فخشج إٌ١ٙا‬ ‫جّاػح ِٓ اٌرجّ اس ٠ش٠ذْٚ أْ ٠ثراػٛا ِّا ف١ٙا ِٓ اٌّراع. فجٍغٛا ٠رشاٚسْٚ فٟ ٔاح١ح ِٓ اٌّشوة، ٚلاي‬ ‫تؼعُٙ ٌثؼط: اسجؼٛا ٠ِٕٛا ٘زا ال ٔشرشٞ ُِٕٙ ش١ياً حرٝ ٠ىغذ اٌّراع ػٍ١ُٙ ف١شخصٛا ػٍ١ٕا، ِغ إٔٔا‬ ‫ِحراجْٛ إٌ١ٗ، ٚع١شخص. فخاٌف اٌطش٠ك ٚجاء إٌٝ أصحاب اٌّشوة، فاتراع ُِٕٙ ِا ف١ٗ تّائح أٌف د٠ٕاس‬ ‫ٔغ١يح ٚأظٙش أٔٗ ٠ش٠ذ أْ ٠ٕمً ِراػٗ إٌٝ ِذ٠ٕح أخشٜ. فٍّا عّغ اٌرجاس رٌه خافٛا أْ ٠ز٘ة رٌه اٌّراع ِٓ‬ ‫أ٠ذ٠ُٙ، فأستحٖٛ ػٍٝ ِا اشرشاٖ ِائح أٌف دسُ٘، ٚأحاي ػٍ١ُٙ أصحاب اٌّشوة تاٌثالٟ، ٚحًّ ستحٗ إٌٝ‬ ‫أصحاتٗ ٚورة ػٍٝ تاب اٌّذ٠ٕح: ػمً ٠َٛ ٚاحذ ثّٕٗ ِائح أٌف دسُ٘.‬ ‫5‬
  6. 6. ‫‪Fatima Alsaiari‬‬ ‫فٍّا واْ اٌ١َٛ اٌشاتغ لاٌٛا التٓ اٌٍّه: أطٍك أٔد ٚاورغة ٌٕا تمعائه ٚلذسن. فأطٍك اتٓ اٌٍّه حرٝ أذٝ‬ ‫إٌٝ تاب ٌّذ٠ٕح فجٍظ ػٍٝ ِرىأ فٟ تاب اٌّذ٠ٕح، ٚاذفك أْ ٍِه ذٍه إٌاح١ح ِاخ ٌُٚ ٠خٍف ٌٚذاً ٚال أحذاً را‬ ‫لشاتح. فّشّٚا ػٍ١ٗ تجٕاصج اٌٍّه ٌُٚ ٠حضٔٗ ٚوٍُٙ ٠حضْٔٛ. فأٔىشٚا حاٌٗ ٚشرّٗ اٌثٛاب، ٚلاي ٌٗ: ِٓ أٔد‬ ‫٠ا ٘زا؟ ِٚا ٠جٍغه ػٍٝ تاب اٌّذ٠ٕح ٚال ٔشان ذحضْ ٌّٛخ اٌٍّه؟ ٚغشدٖ اٌثٛاب ػٓ اٌثاب فٍّا ر٘ثٛا ػاد‬ ‫اٌغالَ فجٍظ ِىأٗ. فٍّا دفٕٛا اٌٍّه ٚسجؼٛا تصش تٗ اٌثٛاب فغعة ٚلاي ٌٗ: أٌُ أٔٙه ػٓ اٌجٍٛط فٟ ٘زا‬ ‫اٌّٛظغ؟ ٚأخزٖ ٚحثغٗ. فٍّا واْ اٌغذ اجرّغ أً٘ ذٍه اٌّذ٠ٕح ٠رشاٚسْٚ ف١ّٓ ٠ٍّىٛٔٗ ػٍ١ُٙ، ٚوً ُِٕٙ‬ ‫ٌّ‬ ‫٠رطاٚي ٠ٕظش صاحثٗ، ٚ٠خرٍفْٛ ت١ُٕٙ. فماي ٌُٙ اٌثٛاب: إٟٔ سأ٠د أِظ غالِاً جاٌغاً ػٍٝ اٌثاب، ٌُٚ أسٖ‬ ‫٠حضْ ٌحضٕٔا، فىٍّرٗ فٍُ ٠جثٕٟ، فطشدذٗ ػٓ اٌثاب. فٍّا ػذخ سأ٠رٗ جاٌغاً فأدخٍرٗ اٌغجٓ ِخافح أْ ٠ىْٛ‬ ‫ػ١ٕاً. فثؼثد أششاف أً٘ اٌّذ٠ٕح إٌٝ اٌغالَ فجاءٚا تٗ، ٚعأٌٖٛ ػٓ حاٌٗ، ِٚا ألذِٗ إٌٝ ِذ٠ٕرُٙ. فماي: أٔا‬ ‫اتٓ ٍِه فٛ٠شاْ، ٚإٔٗ ٌّا ِاخ ٚاٌذٞ غٍثٕٟ أخٟ ػٍٝ اٌٍّهْ، فٙشتد ِٓ ٠ذٖ حزساً ػٍٝ ٔفغٟ حرٝ أرٙ١د‬ ‫ُ‬ ‫إٌٝ ٘زٖ اٌغا٠ح. فٍّا روش اٌغالَ ِا روشٖ ِٓ أِشٖ ػشفٗ ِٓ واْ ٠غشٝ أسض أت١ٗ ُِٕٙ، ٚأثٕٛا ػٍٝ أت١ٗ‬ ‫خ١شاً. ثُ إْ األششاف اخراسٚا اٌغالَ أْ ٠ٍّىٖٛ ػٍ١ُٙ ٚسظٛا تٗ. ٚواْ ألً٘ ذٍه اٌّذ٠ٕح عٕح إرا ٍِىٛا‬ ‫ػٍ١ُٙ ٍِىاً حٍّٖٛ ػٍٝ ف١ً أت١ط، ٚغافٛا تٗ حٛاٌٟ اٌّذ٠ٕح. فٍّا فؼٍٛا تٗ رٌه ِش تثاب اٌّذ٠ٕح فشأٜ‬ ‫ّ‬ ‫اٌىراتح ػٍٝ اٌثاب فأِش أْ ٠ىرة: إْ االجرٙاد ٚاٌجّاي ٚاٌؼمً ِٚا أصاب اٌشجً فٟ اٌذٔ١ا ِٓ خ١ش أٚ شش‬ ‫إّٔا ٘ٛ تمعاء ٚلذس ِٓ هللا ػض ٚجً. ٚلذ اصددخ فٟ رٌه اػرثاساً تّا عاق هللا إٌٟ ِٓ اٌىشاِح ٚاٌخ١ش. ثُ‬ ‫ّ‬ ‫أطٍك إٌٝ ِجٍغٗ فجٍظ ػٍٝ عش٠ش ٍِىٗ ٚأسعً إٌٝ أصحاتٗ اٌز٠ٓ واْ ِؼُٙ فأحعشُ٘ فأششن صاحة‬ ‫اٌؼمً ِغ اٌٛصساء، ٚظُ صاحة االجرٙاد إٌٝ أصحاب اٌضسع، ٚأِش ٌصاحة اٌجّاي تّاي وث١ش ثُ ٔفاٖ وٟ ال‬ ‫ٍ‬ ‫ّ‬ ‫٠فررٓ تٗ. ثُ جّغ ػٍّاء أسظٗ ٚرٚٞ اٌشأٞ ُِٕٙ ٚلاي ٌُٙ: أِا أصحاتٟ فمذ ذ١مٕٛا أْ اٌزٞ سصلُٙ هللا‬ ‫عثحأٗ ٚذؼاٌٝ ِٓ اٌخ١ش إّٔا ٘ٛ تمعاء هللا ٚلذسٖ، ٚإّٔا أحة أْ ذؼٍّٛا رٌه ٚذغر١مٕٖٛ، فإْ اٌزٞ ِٕحٕٟ‬ ‫هللا ٚ٘١أٖ ٌٟ إّٔا واْ تمذس، ٌُٚ ٠ىٓ تجّاي ٚال ػمً ٚال اجرٙاد. ِٚا وٕد أسجٛ إر غشدٟٔ أخٟ أْ ٠ص١ثٕٟ‬ ‫ِا ٠ؼ١شٕٟ ِٓ اٌمٛخ فعالً ػٓ أْ أص١ة ٘زٖ إٌّضٌح، ِٚا وٕد أؤًِ أْ أوْٛ تٙا: ألٟٔ لذ سأ٠د فٟ ٘زٖ‬ ‫األسض ِٓ ٘ٛ أفعً ِٕٟ حغٕاً ٚجّاالً، ٚأشذ اجرٙاداً ٚأعذ سأ٠اً، فغالٕٟ اٌمعاء إٌٝ أْ أػرضصخ تمذس ِٓ‬ ‫هللا، ٚواْ فٟ رٌه اٌجّغ ش١خ فٕٙط حرٝ اعرٜٛ لائّاً، ٚلاي: إٔه لذ ذىٍّد تىالَ واًِ ػمً ٚحىّح، ٚإْ‬ ‫اٌزٞ تٍغ ته رٌه ٚفٛص ػمٍه ٚحغٓ ظّٕه، ٚلذ حممد ظٕٕا ف١ه ٚسجاءٔا ٌه. ٚلذ ػشفٕا ِا روشخ، ٚصذلٕان‬ ‫ً‬ ‫ف١ّا ٚصفد. ٚاٌزٞ عاق هللا إٌ١ه ِٓ اٌٍّه ٚاٌىشاِح وٕد أ٘ال ٌٗ، ٌّا لغُ هللا ذؼاٌٝ ٌه ِٓ اٌؼمً ٚاٌشأٞ.‬ ‫ُ ِ‬ ‫ٚإٟٔ أعؼذ إٌاط فٟ اٌذٔ١ا ٚا٢خشج ِٓ سصلٗ هللا سأ٠اً ٚػمالً.‬ ‫6‬
  7. 7. Fatima Alsaiari The Arabic Translating Text of the English Short Story The Emperor’s New Suit ‫[ التعليق‬d32]: By(capitalization) by: Hans Christian Andersen The Arabic translation by: Fatima Amer Alsaiari 0879008 Editing by: Basmah Mahdi AL-Bogami 0879474 Instructor: Dr. Shadia Banjar 7
  8. 8. ‫‪Fatima Alsaiari‬‬ ‫‪Practicum in Translation‬‬ ‫644‬ ‫ثياب اإلمبراطور الجديدة‬ ‫1‬ ‫:]33‪ [d‬التعليق‬ ‫من االبلغ قول في قديم‬ ‫في زمن من األزمان عاش إمبراطور يحرص كثيرً ا على ارتداء مبلبس جديدة ويصرف عليها كل‬ ‫ٌ‬ ‫الزمان‬ ‫ماله لكي يحصل عليها، وكان همه الوحيد هو كيف يكون دائمًا في أبهى حلّة. لم يكن اإلمبراطور‬ ‫:]43‪ [d‬التعليق‬ ‫يبذل كال ما لديه من مال‬ ‫ً‬ ‫حريصا على دولته وجنوده، وقاعة اجتماعاته ومؤتمراته لم تجذبه يومًا وتسليه، بقدر ما تفرحه رؤية‬ ‫لكي ينالها‬ ‫ووراء مبلبس جديدة، وفي كل ساعة من اليوم له بذلة جديدة وبدل أن قال عنه: "إنه في قاعة‬ ‫ُ‬ ‫المؤتمرات " يقال: "إن اإلمبراطور في غرفة المبلبس ".‬ ‫في كل يوم في المدينة التي يحكم فيها اإلمبراطور يأتي العديد من الزائرين الغرباء من كل أنحاء‬ ‫العالم. وفي أحد األيام أتى إلى المدينة محتاالن وأوهما سكان المدينة بأنهما خياطان نسجان أجود‬ ‫أنواع الثياب التي ال تخطر على البال، وزعموا أن تميز عملهم وتفرده ليس في نوعية المبلبس‬ ‫وألوانها فقط، بل إن المبلبس مصنوعة من مواد عجيبة تجعل من يرتديها ال يراه األغبياء جدا،‬ ‫وكذلك غير المخلصين والمؤهلين لمناصبهم.‬ ‫" ال بد من أنها مبلبس مدهوة " قال اإلمبراطور، " عندما أرتد هذه الثياب المصنوعة بهذه‬ ‫الخصائص الفريدة سأكون قادرً ا على التعرف على غير الكفء لمناصبهم في إمبراطوريتي، كما‬ ‫ً‬ ‫ً‬ ‫أستطيع التفريق بين الذكي والغبي، يجب أن أحصل عليها حاال وبدون تأخير"، ومنح المحتالين مبلغا‬ ‫كبيرً ا من المال لكي يزاوال العمل بسرعة وبدون إضاعة للوقت.‬ ‫أوهموا :]53‪ [d‬التعليق‬ ‫بدأ المحتاالن في النسج بالنول، وأهموا من يراهما بأنهما يعمبلن بجد، ولكنهما في الواقع لم يفعبل‬ ‫ً‬ ‫ويئا بالنول، ومع ذلك طلبا أجود أنواع الحرير وأنفس الخيوط المذهبة واحتفظوا بها بعيدا ألنفسهم،‬‫ً‬ ‫وعمبل على نول فارغ حتى وقت متأخر من الليل.‬ ‫ٍ‬ ‫فكر األمير: "يجب أن أرى كم أنجزا من العمل في القماش " ثم وعر بأنها ليست بذات السهولة عندما‬ ‫ً‬ ‫تذكر أن األغبياء ومن ال يصلح لمنصبه لن يتمكنوا من رؤيته، ثم فضل األمير أن يرسل وخصا ما‬ ‫إلى غرفة الحياكة لكي يرى سير العمل هناك ال سيما وأن كل وخص في المدينة يتحدث عن المواد‬ ‫الفاخرة والفريدة التي ستصنع منها المبلبس، والجميع في ترقب ليرى من سيكون غبيًا من جيرانهم.‬ ‫8‬
  9. 9. ‫‪Fatima Alsaiari‬‬ ‫2‬ ‫حدث األمير نفسه: " سأرسل وزير العجوز المخلص إلى هذين النساجين لكي يحكم على المبلبس ال‬ ‫سيما وأنه ذكي ومتفاني لعمله ومنصبه ".‬ ‫ذهب الوزير إلى غرفة المحتالين حيث كانا يجلسان أمام النول الفارغ، وفتح عينيه بوسعهما وقال‬ ‫ً‬ ‫بدهوة: "أنا ال أكاد أن أرى ويئا " ولكنه كتم ذلك ولم يخبر النساجين. طلب منه المحتاالن أن يقترب‬ ‫منهما وسأاله إذا ما أعجبته الخامات الفاخرة واأللوان الرائعة وأوارا إلى النول الفارغ. بذل الوزير‬ ‫ً‬ ‫المسكين ما بوسعه ولكنه لم يرَ ويئا، وأخذ يحدث نفسه: " يا إلهي هل يعقل أن أكون غبيًا؟ يجب أن‬ ‫؟؟؟؟ :]63‪ [d‬التعليق‬ ‫ال أخبر أحدا بذلك، هل من الممكن أن أكون غير كفءٍٍٍٍ لمنصبي؟ ال، ال يمكن ذلك، وال‬ ‫ٍ ٍ ٍ ٍ ٍ‬ ‫ً‬ ‫أستطيع إخبارهم بأنني ال أرى القماش !"‬ ‫ً‬ ‫ً‬ ‫سأل أحد المحتاالن وهو يوهم الوزير بكونه موغوال بالحياكة: "لماذا ال تقول ويئا سيد ؟"‬ ‫أجاب الوزير وهو يحدق من خبلل نظارته: "يا إلهي، إنها رائعة وجميلة إلى حد بعيد، يجب أن أخبر‬ ‫ٍ‬ ‫اإلمبراطور بحجم إعجابي بهذه األقموة"، أجاب الحائكان المحتاالن: "نحن سعيدان لسماع ذلك "‬ ‫وأخذا يصفان له األلوان ويورحان له جودة وفخامة الخامات المستخدمة. سمع الوزير ما قااله‬ ‫ً‬ ‫بإنصات وديد لكي يرو لئلمبراطور ذلك، وفعبل أخبره به.‬ ‫ثم طلب المحتاالن المزيد من المال والخامات المستلزمة للحياكة ووضعا كل ذلك في جيوبهما بينما لم‬ ‫ً‬ ‫ً‬ ‫يستخدما خيطا واحدا، واستمروا في العمل والحياكة بالنول الفارغ.‬ ‫بعد ذلك أرسل اإلمبراطور أحد الخدم مرة أخرى إلى النساجين ليرى سير العمل، وما إذا كان‬ ‫ً‬ ‫سيفرغان من الخياطة قريبًا؟ ولكن الخادم مثل الوزير، كرر النظر ولكنه لم يرَ ويئا، وكأن المكان‬ ‫خالي تمامًا من األقموة.‬ ‫3‬ ‫"أليست ثيابًا جميلة؟ " سأل المحتبلن الخادم مبينان جودة األقموة والتي هي ليست موجودة باألساس.‬ ‫ً‬ ‫ٌ‬ ‫" لست غبيًا " حدث الخادم نفسه، "ربما أنني غير كفء لمنصبي !، أمر غريب حقا ولكنني لن أخبر‬ ‫ٍ‬ ‫باأللوان :]73‪ [d‬التعليق‬ ‫ً‬ ‫أحدا على اإلطبلق"، ثم مدح الثياب التي لم يراها وعبر عن إعجابه باألوان الجميلة والتصميم الرائع.‬ ‫ا رائعة ".‬ ‫ثم أخبر اإلمبراطور: "إنها حقً‬ ‫أصبحت ثياب اإلمبراطور الفاخرة حديث أهل المدينة، وتمنى اإلمبراطور أن يراها بنفسه بينما هي‬ ‫ال زالت تنسج. لذا ذهب اإلمبراطور مع عدد من رجال الحاوية فيما بينهم الوزير والخادم إلى‬ ‫المحتالين الذكيين اللذين أوهما الجميع بأنهما يعمبلن بأقصى ما يمكنهما لينجزا ثياب اإلمبراطور‬ ‫ولكن بدون استخدام أ خيط.‬ ‫9‬
  10. 10. ‫‪Fatima Alsaiari‬‬ ‫"أليست رائعة؟ّ " قال الوزير العجوز والخادم اللذان سبق لهما زيارة المحتالين، "هل أعجبت فخامتك‬ ‫األلوان واألقموة؟ " ثم أوارا إلى النول الفارغ مع اعتقادهم بأن الجميع يستطيع أن يرى تلك الثياب‬ ‫المزعومة.‬ ‫( بي) يجب أن يتفق :]83‪ [d‬التعليق‬ ‫ٌي‬ ‫ً‬ ‫" يا إلهي ! " حدث األمير نفسه، " أنا ال أكاد أن أرى ويئا !، هذا مخيف، هل أنا غبيًا؟ هل أنا غير‬ ‫الضمير مع العائد عليه من حيث العدد والنوع‬ ‫صالح ألكون إمبراطورً ا؟ ! البد وأن هذا من أفظع ما يمكن أن يحدث لي في الواقع.‬ ‫ٌي‬ ‫الل :]93‪ [d‬التعليق‬ ‫ً‬ ‫"حقا " قال اإلمبراطور موجهًا حديثه إلى النساجين، "ثيابكم نالت على استحساني وإعجابي " وأومأ‬ ‫ا.‬‫باقتناع أثناء إلقائه نظرة على النول الفارغ، وتظاهر بأنه يرى المبلبس وهو في الواقع ال يرى ويئً‬ ‫ً‬ ‫حدق جميع الحاضرين معه في الفراغ ولم يروا ويئا، وقالوا مثل ما قال اإلمبراطور "إنها في غاية‬ ‫الجمال !". وحث الزائرون اإلمبراطور على ارتداء الثياب الجديدة الفاخرة في المسيرة العظيمة التي‬ ‫ً‬ ‫ستقام قريبًا. وتهافتت المدائح: "إنها حقا فاخرة وجميلة ورائعة " والكل حاول أن يبد سعادته‬ ‫وبهجته، وعين اإلمبراطور المحتالين "خياطي الببلط الملكي ".‬ ‫في الليلة التي سبقت قيام االحتفال والمسيرة، ادعى المحتاالن بأنهما يعمبلن، وأوعبل أكثر من ستة‬ ‫عور ومعة لكي يظهروا للجميع اندماجهم في العمل إلنهاء حياكة مبلبس اإلمبراطور الجديدة ووضع‬ ‫اللمسات األخيرة. ثم أوهما الجميع بأنهما يأخذان المبلبس من النول، ويقصانها بمقص كبير،‬ ‫ويخيطانها بإبرة من دون الخيط، ثم أعلنا: "ثياب اإلمبراطور الجديدة جاهزة اآلن ".‬ ‫4‬ ‫أتى اإلمبراطور وحاويته إلى قاعة االحتفال، جاء المحتاالن وهما يمدان يديهما لؤلعلى وكأنهما‬ ‫:]04‪ [d‬التعليق‬ ‫من األفضل القول بدال من‬ ‫ممسكين بالثياب في يديهما وقاال: "هذا البنطال، وهذه السترة وهنا المعطف ... والخ، إنها رقيقة مثل‬ ‫" الخ" وهكذا‬ ‫نسيج العنكبوت ولن توعر بوجودها على جسدك على اإلطبلق وهنا يكمن جمالها ".‬ ‫ً‬ ‫ً‬ ‫"حقا !" هتف جميع أفراد الحاوية رغم أنهم لم يواهدوا ويئا في الواقع من هذه المبلبس المزعومة.‬ ‫"هبل تفضلتم بنزع مبلبسكم لنتمكن من إلباسكم المبلبس الجديدة هنا أمام المرآة الكبيرة؟ " خاطب‬ ‫المحتاالن اإلمبراطور. نزع اإلمبراطور مبلبسه وتظاهر المحتاالن بأنهما يلبسان اإلمبراطور مبلبسه‬ ‫الجديدة واحدة تلو األخرى وهو ينظر إلى نفسه في المرآة من كل جانب.‬ ‫ً‬ ‫هتف الجميع: "كم تبدو رائعًا ! إنها تناسبك حقا ! يا له من تصميم جميل ورداء فخم ! كم تبدو األلوان‬ ‫جذابة ومبهرة ! إنها أفخم وأروع بذلة على اإلطبلق ".‬ ‫:]14‪ [d‬التعليق‬ ‫حمالو ألنه سبق بان التي‬ ‫ثم أعلن مدير المراسم اإلمبراطورية بأن حمالوا عرش اإلمبراطور جاهزون اآلن للموكب، " أنا‬ ‫ترفع بحذف النون‬ ‫ً‬ ‫جاهز " قال اإلمبراطور، "أليست البذلة تناسبني بوكل رائع؟ " تابع وهو ينظر إلى المرآة ومتيقنا من‬ ‫أن الناس ستعجبهم حلته الجديدة.‬ ‫مد خدم الملك - والذين كانوا هناك لئلمساك بذيل رداء اإلمبراطور- أيديهم وكأنهم يتحسسون األرض‬ ‫ً‬ ‫ليوهموا الجميع بأنهم ممسكين بالذيل في أيدهم، ألنهم لم يرغبوا أن يظهروا للناس بأنهم لم يروا ويئا‬ ‫في الواقع.‬ ‫01‬
  11. 11. ‫‪Fatima Alsaiari‬‬ ‫قدم :]24‪ [d‬التعليق‬ ‫تقدم اإلمبراطور في موكب رائع، وكل من رآه في الطريق أو من النوافذ هتف بإعجاب: "إنه رداء‬ ‫رائع ال وبيه له على اإلطبلق، يا له من ذيل طويل، كم تناسبه الثياب كثيرً ا !" ال أحد يرغب في أن‬ ‫ً‬ ‫يدع اآلخر يعلم بأنه ال يرى ويئا ثم يقول عنه بأنه غير مخلص لئلمبراطورية أو أنه غبيًا. ولكن‬ ‫ثياب اإلمبراطور الجديدة لم تعد مثارً ا لئلعجاب !.‬ ‫5‬ ‫ً‬ ‫إذا هتف طفل صغير: "ولكنه ال يرتد ويئا !".‬ ‫الجملة حيحة ولكن من :]34‪ [d‬التعليق‬ ‫"اسمعوا لما يقوله الطفل الصغير " قال األب، ثم أخذ كل وخص منهم يهمس لآلخر بما قاله الطفل‬ ‫األفضل القول" أن توا لما يقول الطفل‬ ‫ً‬ ‫حتى صرخ الجميع: "ولكنه بالفعل لم يرتد ويئا ". ارتجف اإلمبراطور ووعر بحرج عظيم ألنه‬ ‫ال غير"‬ ‫أدرك الصواب أخيرً ا، ولكنه حدث نفسه: "يجب أن أتم المسيرة وأصمد إلى النهاية"، استمر الموكب‬ ‫ً‬ ‫في السير بوقار وديد ومهابة، وتصرف الخدم وكأنهم يحملون ذيل الرداء الذ لم يكن موجودا على‬ ‫اإلطبلق.‬ ‫11‬
  12. 12. Fatima Alsaiari The Emperor's New Suit Hans Christian Andersen Many, many years ago lived an emperor, who thought so much of new clothes that he spent all his money in order to obtain them; his only ambition was to be always well dressed. He did not care for his soldiers, and the theatre did not amuse him; the only thing, in fact, he thought anything of was to drive out and show a new suit of clothes. He had a coat for every hour of the day; and as one would say of a king "He is in his cabinet," so one could say of him, "The emperor is in his dressing-room." The great city where he resided was very gay; every day many strangers from all parts of the globe arrived. One day two swindlers came to this city; they made people believe that they were weavers, and declared they could manufacture the finest cloth to be imagined. Their colours and patterns, they said, were not only exceptionally beautiful, but the clothes made of their material possessed the wonderful quality of being invisible to any man who was unfit for his office or unpardonably stupid. "That must be wonderful cloth," thought the emperor. "If I were to be dressed in a suit made of this cloth I should be able to find out which men in my empire were unfit for their places, and I could distinguish the clever from the stupid. I must have this cloth woven for me without delay." And he gave a large sum of money to the swindlers, in advance, that they should set to work without any loss of time. They set up two looms, and pretended to be very hard at work, but they did nothing whatever on the looms. They asked for the finest silk and the most precious gold-cloth; all they got they did away with, and worked at the empty looms till late at night. "I should very much like to know how they are getting on with the cloth," thought the emperor. But he felt rather uneasy when he remembered that he who was not fit for his office could not see it. Personally, he was of opinion that he had nothing to fear, yet he thought it advisable to send somebody else first to see how matters stood. Everybody in the town knew what a remarkable quality the stuff possessed, and all were anxious to see how bad or stupid their neighbours were. < 2 > "I shall send my honest old minister to the weavers," thought the emperor. "He can judge best how the stuff looks, for he is intelligent, and nobody understands his office better than he." The good old minister went into the room where the swindlers sat before the empty looms. "Heaven preserve us!" he thought, and opened his eyes wide, "I cannot see anything at all," but he did not say so. Both swindlers requested him to 12
  13. 13. Fatima Alsaiari come near, and asked him if he did not admire the exquisite pattern and the beautiful colours, pointing to the empty looms. The poor old minister tried his very best, but he could see nothing, for there was nothing to be seen. "Oh dear," he thought, "can I be so stupid? I should never have thought so, and nobody must know it! Is it possible that I am not fit for my office? No, no, I cannot say that I was unable to see the cloth." "Now, have you got nothing to say?" said one of the swindlers, while he pretended to be busily weaving. "Oh, it is very pretty, exceedingly beautiful," replied the old minister looking through his glasses. "What a beautiful pattern, what brilliant colours! I shall tell the emperor that I like the cloth very much." "We are pleased to hear that," said the two weavers, and described to him the colours and explained the curious pattern. The old minister listened attentively, that he might relate to the emperor what they said; and so he did. Now the swindlers asked for more money, silk and gold-cloth, which they required for weaving. They kept everything for themselves, and not a thread came near the loom, but they continued, as hitherto, to work at the empty looms. Soon afterwards the emperor sent another honest courtier to the weavers to see how they were getting on, and if the cloth was nearly finished. Like the old minister, he looked and looked but could see nothing, as there was nothing to be seen. < 3 > "Is it not a beautiful piece of cloth?" asked the two swindlers, showing and explaining the magnificent pattern, which, however, did not exist. "I am not stupid," said the man. "It is therefore my good appointment for which I am not fit. It is very strange, but I must not let any one know it;" and he praised the cloth, which he did not see, and expressed his joy at the beautiful colours and the fine pattern. "It is very excellent," he said to the emperor. Everybody in the whole town talked about the precious cloth. At last the emperor wished to see it himself, while it was still on the loom. With a number of courtiers, including the two who had already been there, he went to the two clever swindlers, who now worked as hard as they could, but without using any thread. "Is it not magnificent?" said the two old statesmen who had been there before. "Your Majesty must admire the colours and the pattern." And then they pointed to the empty looms, for they imagined the others could see the cloth. 13
  14. 14. Fatima Alsaiari "What is this?" thought the emperor, "I do not see anything at all. That is terrible! Am I stupid? Am I unfit to be emperor? That would indeed be the most dreadful thing that could happen to me." "Really," he said, turning to the weavers, "your cloth has our most gracious approval;" and nodding contentedly he looked at the empty loom, for he did not like to say that he saw nothing. All his attendants, who were with him, looked and looked, and although they could not see anything more than the others, they said, like the emperor, "It is very beautiful." And all advised him to wear the new magnificent clothes at a great procession which was soon to take place. "It is magnificent, beautiful, excellent," one heard them say; everybody seemed to be delighted, and the emperor appointed the two swindlers "Imperial Court weavers." The whole night previous to the day on which the procession was to take place, the swindlers pretended to work, and burned more than sixteen candles. People should see that they were busy to finish the emperor's new suit. They pretended to take the cloth from the loom, and worked about in the air with big scissors, and sewed with needles without thread, and said at last: "The emperor's new suit is ready now." < 4 > The emperor and all his barons then came to the hall; the swindlers held their arms up as if they held something in their hands and said: "These are the trousers!" "This is the coat!" and "Here is the cloak!" and so on. "They are all as light as a cobweb, and one must feel as if one had nothing at all upon the body; but that is just the beauty of them." "Indeed!" said all the courtiers; but they could not see anything, for there was nothing to be seen. "Does it please your Majesty now to graciously undress," said the swindlers, "that we may assist your Majesty in putting on the new suit before the large looking-glass?" The emperor undressed, and the swindlers pretended to put the new suit upon him, one piece after another; and the emperor looked at himself in the glass from every side. "How well they look! How well they fit!" said all. "What a beautiful pattern! What fine colours! That is a magnificent suit of clothes!" The master of the ceremonies announced that the bearers of the canopy, which was to be carried in the procession, were ready. 14
  15. 15. Fatima Alsaiari "I am ready," said the emperor. "Does not my suit fit me marvellously?" Then he turned once more to the looking-glass, that people should think he admired his garments. The chamberlains, who were to carry the train, stretched their hands to the ground as if they lifted up a train, and pretended to hold something in their hands; they did not like people to know that they could not see anything. The emperor marched in the procession under the beautiful canopy, and all who saw him in the street and out of the windows exclaimed: "Indeed, the emperor's new suit is incomparable! What a long train he has! How well it fits him!" Nobody wished to let others know he saw nothing, for then he would have been unfit for his office or too stupid. Never emperor's clothes were more admired. < 5 > "But he has nothing on at all," said a little child at last. "Good heavens! listen to the voice of an innocent child," said the father, and one whispered to the other what the child had said. "But he has nothing on at all," cried at last the whole people. That made a deep impression upon the emperor, for it seemed to him that they were right; but he thought to himself, "Now I must bear up to the end." And the chamberlains walked with still greater dignity, as if they carried the train which did not exist. 15

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