Product Design Sprint

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a move fast method to sharp the idea and design in five days. It has been proven to most of the startup under Google ventures. Want to know more how to build it, just contact me. :)

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Product Design Sprint

  1. 1. Product Design Sprint By Faren
  2. 2. 2002 Nice product, didn’t it?
  3. 3.  Tablet PCs failed to gain popularity in the consumer space because of unresolved problems. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_tablet_computers#cite_note-BallStillDoesnt2010-30
  4. 4. A lot of good Ideas. What’s next?
  5. 5. Product Design Sprint
  6. 6. Product Design Sprint A Few More Developed Ideas A Broad Range of Concepts Constrain (limited time & narrow field)
  7. 7. Preparation... Pick a big fight
  8. 8. …Preparation • Get the right people – Designer – CEO – Product manager – User expert – Engineer – Marketer – Anybody else who’s interested
  9. 9. ...Preparation • Find a facilitator • Gather the ingredients • Schedule the user study before you have anything to test
  10. 10. Product Design Sprint 1 2 43 5 Sketch the most important user story User storyboard of many solutions as possible Whiteboard the user story Build something quick and dirty that can be shown to users Show the prototype to real humans (user) Iteration Understand ValidateDecideDiverge Prototype
  11. 11. Product Design Sprint 1 2 43 5 Iteration Understand ValidateDecideDiverge Prototype Sketch the most important user story
  12. 12. Product Design Sprint 1 2 43 5 Iteration Understand ValidateDecideDiverge Prototype 2A 2B 2C 2D 2E 2F 2G Choose part of the problem Now decide which part to focus on first. It usually makes sense to have everybody in the sprint focus on the same part of the problem at once. If you take that approach, you’ll do one cycle for each part of the problem, with everybody collaborating on each part as you go. A B
  13. 13. Product Design Sprint 1 2 43 5 Iteration Understand ValidateDecideDiverge Prototype 2A 2B 2C 2D 2E 2F 2G Take notes At this point in the sprint, the whiteboards and walls are probably covered in diagrams, notes, and sticky notes. This is your chance to reload that stuff into your brain. Everyone takes a piece of paper and jots down anything they think is useful.
  14. 14. Product Design Sprint 1 2 43 5 Iteration Understand ValidateDecideDiverge Prototype 2A 2B 2C 2D 2E 2F 2G Mind map Now you’re going to add all the other ideas that are in your head, mix them with the notes you just took, and loosely organize them on paper. The mind map is going to be your “cheat sheet” you can use when you’re sketching UI ideas.
  15. 15. Product Design Sprint 1 2 43 5 Iteration Understand ValidateDecideDiverge Prototype 2A 2B 2C 2D 2E 2F 2G Crazy eights Everybody folds a blank sheet of paper in half four times, then unfolds it, so they get eight panels. Then you have 5 minutes total to draw eight sketches, one in each panel.
  16. 16. Product Design Sprint 1 2 43 5 Iteration Understand ValidateDecideDiverge Prototype 2A 2B 2C 2D 2E 2F 2G Storyboard That will be shared anonymously and critiqued by the group. The goal is to take the ideas we’ve generated so far and sketch an actual UI showing how a user would move through this part of the story where they click, what info they enter, what they think, etc. Start with a blank sheet of paper, and put 3 sticky notes on it. Each sticky note is one frame in the storyboard. It’s kind of like a comic book that you’re going to fill in.
  17. 17. Product Design Sprint 1 2 43 5 Iteration Understand ValidateDecideDiverge Prototype 2A 2B 2C 2D 2E 2F 2G Silent critique Give everybody a bunch of dot stickers. Then, without speaking, everybody looks at the different storyboards and puts a sticker on every idea or part of an idea they like. There are no limits to how many stickers you can use, and I don’t even prevent people who want to brazenly vote for their own ideas. By the end, you’ve got a kind of heat map, and some ideas are already standing out.
  18. 18. Product Design Sprint 1 2 43 5 Iteration Understand ValidateDecideDiverge Prototype 2A 2B 2C 2D 2E 2F 2G Three-minute critiques everybody gathers around the storyboards one at a time. First, people talk about what they liked, then we ask the person who drew it if we missed anything important. Usually the best, most popular ideas are the ones people can understand without an explanation, so the author of the storyboard often doesn’t have anything else to add.
  19. 19. Product Design Sprint 1 2 43 5 Iteration Understand ValidateDecideDiverge Prototype 3A 3B 3C 3D Search for conflicts A conflict is a place where there are two or more different approaches to solving the same problem. Each conflict is like a little gold mine.
  20. 20. Product Design Sprint 1 2 43 5 Iteration Understand ValidateDecideDiverge Prototype 3A 3B 3C 3D Best shot or battle royale You can prototype several different approaches and test them against each other (the “battle royale”) or you can go with a single prototype (the “best shot”).
  21. 21. Product Design Sprint 1 2 43 5 Iteration Understand ValidateDecideDiverge Prototype 3A 3B 3C 3D Test your assumptions Listing out your underlying assumptions is a good way to revisit the big picture.
  22. 22. Product Design Sprint 1 2 43 5 Iteration Understand ValidateDecideDiverge Prototype 3A 3B 3C 3D Whiteboard the user story Now we’re going to make a storyboard that shows exactly how the user will step through your prototype, click by click. This storyboard will become the spec for building the prototype. This is an activity that the group does together — it’s actually the last group step before you break for prototyping. Get one person to draw, but don’t make them figure everything out on their own.
  23. 23. Product Design Sprint 1 2 43 5 Iteration Understand ValidateDecideDiverge Prototype Create a real-looking version of storyboard Quite simply, a prototype is anything a person can look at and respond to. A prototype doesn’t usually have to be very complex in order to learn what you need to know.
  24. 24. Product Design Sprint 1 2 43 5 Iteration Understand ValidateDecideDiverge Prototype Show the prototype to real humans and learn what works and what doesn't work
  25. 25. Product Design Sprint 1 2 43 5 Iteration Understand ValidateDecideDiverge Prototype Moving this fast, we know we'll make mistakes, sometimes a lot of mistakes. But that's a good thing. Use design as a means of compressing time, not getting too precise with each design decision, trusting that in iterative design sprints the accuracy of the decisions will improve. And each time they do it, products get measurably better.
  26. 26. PDS’ Important Points... • Bring all ideas • Design work is best done by an individual • Understanding, NOT brainstorming
  27. 27. ...PDS’ Important Points • Because new ideas are so shiny and fresh, the facilitator needs to remind everyone to think old first. • The magic of constrain • All about user perspective (user need, user story & user validation) • Iteration
  28. 28. References • PDS created by Jake Knapp, a Google Ventures designer and product development expert. • It’s based on the design thinking structure championed by IDEO and Stanford’s d.school. • Jusi Mikkonen, The Design Sprint, Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture

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