Lift of a wing

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Lift of a wing

  1. 1. Lift of a wing
  2. 2. The four aerodynamic forces
  3. 3. Lift <ul><li>Lift is the force that pushes the object up </li></ul>
  4. 4. Drag <ul><li>Drag is the force that pushes the object backwards. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Thrust <ul><li>Thrust is the force that pushes object forwards </li></ul>
  6. 6. Weight <ul><li>Weight is the force that pushes the object down </li></ul>Lift
  7. 7. What is lift? <ul><li>Lift is a mechanical aerodynamic force produced by the motion of the airplane through the air. </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Since lift is a force it a vector quantity hence has both a magnitude and a direction associated with it. </li></ul>
  9. 10. Bernoulli’s explanation <ul><li>The distance is larger at the top then the bottom. </li></ul><ul><li>The air flow meets at the same time hence the air at the top is faster. </li></ul><ul><li>Therefore it exerts less pressure than the air at the bottom. </li></ul><ul><li>This is lift </li></ul>
  10. 11. How is lift generated? <ul><li>Lift   is generated by the interaction and contact of a solid body with a fluid. </li></ul>
  11. 12. The flaw on this famous explanation <ul><li>The assumption is the air at the bottom and top reaches the same point at the same time. </li></ul><ul><li>If the wing is upside down using this explanation it should drop however it will still fly. </li></ul>
  12. 13. Upside down wing
  13. 14. Why does the plane still fly then? <ul><li>This can be explained using Newton 2 and Newton 3. </li></ul><ul><li>The net force on an object is equal to its rate of momentum change </li></ul><ul><li>To every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. </li></ul>
  14. 15. The correct theory <ul><li>An aircraft wing, both the upper and lower surfaces contribute to the flow turning. In an airplane wing, the wing exerts a downward force on the air and the air exerts an upward force on the wing. </li></ul>
  15. 16. Bibliography <ul><li>http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/k-12/airplane/lift1.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.desktop.aero/appliedaero/wingdesign/geomnldistn.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.allstar.fiu.edu/aero/airflylvl3.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=230054 </li></ul><ul><li>http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/fluids/airfoil.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.turnertoys.com/G1/aeroScience/default.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/education/rocket/rktth1.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://quest.nasa.gov/aero/planetary/atmospheric/forces.html </li></ul>

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