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Diversion First Stakeholders Meeting: Jan. 28, 2019

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Diversion First Stakeholders Meeting: Jan. 28, 2019

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Diversion First Stakeholders Meeting: Jan. 28, 2019

  1. 1. Diversion First Stakeholders Meeting | January 28, 2019
  2. 2. Meeting Agenda  Welcome & Announcements  Mental Health Docket - Discussion  Jail-Based Addiction Treatment and Recovery Program  Merrifield Crisis Response Center(MCRC)/Community Response Team  2018 MCRC Data  Wrap-Up 2
  3. 3. Sequential Intercept Model (SIM)  Applied for and received workshop to develop new SIM map through SAMHSA’s GAINS Center for Behavioral Health and Justice Transformation.  Spring 2019: Will update our community-specific SIM map and use as a strategic planning tool. 3
  4. 4. 2018 Annual Report  Highlights and Success Stories of 2018  What’s Ahead for 2019 Coming Soon! 4
  5. 5. Mental Health Docket The Honorable Judge Tina Snee Dawn Butorac | Chief Public Defender Casey Lingan | Chief Deputy Commonwealth Attorney Shawn Lherisse | Court Services Marissa Fariña-Morse | Community Services Board 5
  6. 6. Supervised Release Program Docket (SRP) Since August 2018, 160 cases have been heard in the pilot Mental Health Docket.  60 have appeared more than once  50 appeared due to something other than SRP (Bond Motion, Competency, Probation) Different functions:  Bond Modification  Compliance with Disposition of Charges  Treatment Compliance  Competency Restoration 2nd and 4th Friday of each month, Courtroom 2K 6
  7. 7. SRP Docket Court Services Role  Make recommendations on release  Monitor compliance with the Court Order and report non-compliance  Court appearance reminder to client & attorney  Verify compliance and participation with treatment providers  Make appropriate referrals Community Services Board (CSB) Role  Provide timely information on status of CSB services  Encouragement to follow treatment recommendations  Follow up to assist in accessing services  Recommendations to the court for services needed and process to access them 7
  8. 8. Peer Support Specialists & SRP Docket CSB Peer Support Specialist  Assistance (transportation, directions)  Supportive Environment  Rapport Building  Information on Community Resources 8
  9. 9. Mental Health Docket Official Mental Health Docket  Finalizing Application State Supreme Court  Target Launch April 2019 Emerging Needs  Mental Health Docket Coordinator  Commonwealth’s Attorney  Public Defender’s Office  12th Judge GDC Bench  Community Based Services - Housing (emergency/long term) - Treatment Access - Transportation - Peer Support Specialists/Engagement 9
  10. 10. As we move forward with the Mental Health Docket, which elements do you think would be important to include in our planning? Email:DiversionFirst@fairfaxcounty.gov 10
  11. 11. Jail-Based Addiction Treatment and Recovery Program Stacey Kincaid| Sheriff
  12. 12. Chesterfield County Jail HARP 12
  13. 13. Fairfax County Adult Detention Center 13
  14. 14. Who Is Eligible?  VOLUNTARY!  Referred by Sheriff’s Office, CSB or self  Fairfax County or City resident  History of substance use disorder  Pre- or post-sentenced  Ideally less than 3 years to serve  No violent crime convictions within 10 years  No history of sexual crimes  Positive jail adjustment  Panel interview 14
  15. 15. What Is It About? Living in Balance & 12-Step program Recognize trauma Identify triggers Manage stress Develop social supports Set goals Recommit after setback 15
  16. 16. What Is Next? Data collection – GMU team: How do we gauge success? Sheriff’s Office re-entry specialist position Assistance from Re-Entry Council Continuity of care – CSB partners Transitional housing and job readiness 16
  17. 17. Merrifield Crisis Response Center (MCRC) Co-Responder Pilot Dwayne Machosky | Police Department Abbey May | Community Service Board Redic Morris | Sheriff’s Office Adam Willemssen | Fire & Rescue
  18. 18. Merrifield Crisis Response Center  Youth Drop-in Group- “Heads Up”  Parent’s Group- “Talk It Out” Peer led and Youth and Family Staff Open House: February 4 2 to 3 p.m. Group Launch: February 7 6 to 7:30 p.m. 18
  19. 19. Merrifield Crisis Response Center Medical Clearance Partnership with Inova and CSB to provide medical clearance at the MCRC Goal is to decrease number of clearances in emergency department, improve client experience, and increase safety Pilot:  Positions are advertised  Electronic health record build  Contract under review 19
  20. 20. Co-Responder Model Community Response Team (CRT) - Public Safety and CSB responding together on super-utilizer calls Pilot launched November 2018 Goals and outcomes More efficient and appropriate use of resources Improvements in public safety and community health Reduction in calls for service Outreach, intervention, and diversion from arrest Criteria 6 or more calls to public safety within 60 days Referrals from dispatch (advised events) 20
  21. 21. Co-Responder Model Demographics Disposition Responses by public safety Number and duration of calls Demonstrated Need 2018 35 Super Utilizers Tracked 2343 calls to Dispatch 708 Fire and Rescue Dept. calls 466 Fire and Rescue transports 481 Law Enforcement involved responses 21
  22. 22. Example 1 (pre-CRT)  264 calls into DPSC -739.72 minutes  3 Advised Events  24 Police Events  32 EMS Events  53 Fire Events Example 2 (pre-CRT)  53 calls into DPSC -395.8 minutes  1 Advised Event  40 Police Events  33 EMS Events  0 Fire Events Co-Responder Model Success Stories 22
  23. 23. Co-Responder Model Working Together:  First step is understanding our differences and learning from each other.  Law enforcement initiated training in the field for all teams to proactively learn operational techniques and learn from each other. 23
  24. 24. Crisis Intervention Team Training Total trained in CIT = 734  283 Trained in 2018 Fairfax County Police = 458, to date Fairfax County Sheriff = 116, to date Included in training total:  City of Falls Church PD  George Mason University PD  Town of Herndon Police PD  Town of Leesburg PD  Loudoun County Sheriff’s Office  Manassas City PD  Metro Transit PD  Metropolitan Washington Airport Authority PD  Northern Virginia Community College PD  Town of Vienna PD  United States Marine Corp  Alexandria City Sheriff’s Office  Alexandria City PD  Central Intelligence Agency  Virginia State Police  Fairfax County Fire & Rescue Department  City of Fairfax PD  Fairfax County Court Services/Pre-Trial Probation  Fairfax County Department of Public Safety Communications
  25. 25. MCRC Community Awareness and Outreach Public Service Announcement Video: 25
  26. 26. 2018 Year End Analysis: MCRC Population Overview Chloe Lee| Community Service Board
  27. 27. 375 403 530 CY 2016 CY 2017 CY 2018 Diverted from Potential Arrest 463 1,033 1,365 1,616 CY 2015 CY 2016 CY 2017 CY 2018 ECO: 2015-2018 249% Increase from 2015 to 2018 56%Increase from 2016 to 2018 41% Increase from 2016 to 2018 Diverted from potential arrest since 2016 Over 1,300 Emergency Custody Orders (ECOs) & Diverted from Arrest 27
  28. 28. Inmates with behavioral health issues Inmates with SMI who are Fairfax County residents and who did forensic intake during the current incarceration and were released during the period of data collection 1,776 Unique individuals in 2018 Evaluation Plan 28
  29. 29. MCRC Population: Demographic Characteristics (N=1,776) 43% Female 57% Male 6% 9% 9% 21% 54% Multi-race Other Asian Black White Race 16% Hispanic or Latino Unstable Housing (Based on CSB EHR and HMIS database in 2018) 10% 29
  30. 30. MCRC Population: Demographic Characteristics (N=1,776) 1% 14% 19% 21% 18% 11% 9% 8% 7-12 13-17 18-22 23-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60 or older Age Group Under 18 15.4% (273) 86% Fairfax County, City and City of Falls-Church Residents 30
  31. 31. MCRC Population: Behavioral Health Characteristics 36%Serious Mental Illness or Serious Emotional Disturbance 22% Substance Use Disorder 11% Alcohol-related Diagnosis 5% Developmental Disability Adult SMI: 37% Minor SED: 26% Adult SUD: 24% Minor SUD: 10% Adult Alcohol: 22% Minor Alcohol: 3% Adult DD: 4% Minor DD: 10%  The SUD prevalence was lower among the MCRC population than among the jail behavioral population (64% of the jail behavioral health population had SUD in 2016).  The SMI prevalence was higher among the MCRC population than among the jail behavioral health population (28% of the jail behavioral health population had SMI in 2016).  There was a significant difference in the prevalence of SUD and DD between adults and minors. 31
  32. 32. Familiar Faces: MCRC Super Utilizers Analysis (N=1,776) 1% 1% 3% 13% 82% 5 times or more 4 times 3 times 2 times 1 time Super Utilizers Diverted more than once in 2018 Over 2% (41 Individuals) Repeated Diversion Top 5%: 89 individuals 32
  33. 33. MCRC Super Utilizers: Associated Factors MCRC Super Utilizers 1 Minors  Minors (under 18) have a higher likelihood of being a super utilizer of MCRC services than adults. 3 People with Serious Mental Illness  People with Serious Mental Illness (SMI) have a higher likelihood of being a super utilizer of MCRC services than people without SMI. 2 Girls  Girls have a higher likelihood of being a super utilizer of MCRC services than boys.  Women and men were not significantly different in the likelihood of being a super utilizer. 4 People with Developmental Disability  People with Developmental Disability (DD) have a higher likelihood of being a super utilizer of MCRC services than people without DD. 33
  34. 34. Next Steps… Sequential Intercept Model Map Focus on Intercepts 4 & 5 NACo Leadership Lab Explore additional opportunities for stakeholder feedback 34
  35. 35. Next Stakeholders Meeting May 16, 2019 7 p.m. Government Center, Rooms 4 & 5 35

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