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1 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Lean Quick Changeover (SMED) Process
by Operational Excellence Consulting LLC
2 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Lean Management – Lean Thinking
“One of the most noteworthy accomplishments in
keeping the price of...
3 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Lean Management – A little Bit of History
Eli Whitney developed the concept of
interchangeable part...
4 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Lean Management – A little Bit of History
In the late 1890s, Frederick W. Taylor
began to look at i...
5 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Lean Management – A little Bit of History
Starting about 1910, Henry Ford
fashioned the first compr...
6 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Lean Management – A little Bit of History
After WW II, Japan started to study
American production m...
7 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Lean Management – A little Bit of History
In 1990 James Womack wrote a book
called "The Machine Tha...
8 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Lean Management – Three Types of Process Activities
Non-
Value
Added
Business-
Value Added
Value-
A...
9 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Key Lean Objectives:
Reduce Lead Time
→ Eliminate or Reduce Non-Value-Added Activities
Lean Managem...
10 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Lean Management – How do you spend your time?
• Value-Adding (VA) – increases worth of a product o...
11 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Lean Management – The 7 Wastes
The seven wastes originated in Japan, where waste is known as “muda...
12 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
The 7 Wastes – Transportation
Transportation
Definition: Any material or information movement, mai...
13 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
The 7 Wastes – Inventory
Inventory
Definition: Any supply, i.e. raw material, work-in-process or f...
14 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
The 7 Wastes – Motion
Motion
Definition: Any movement, incl. searching, of people which does not
c...
15 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
The 7 Wastes – Waiting
Waiting
Definition: Idle time that occurs when codependent processing steps...
16 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
The 7 Wastes – Over-Production
Over-Production
Definition: Producing more than is needed, faster t...
17 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
The 7 Wastes – Over-Processing
Over-Processing
Definition: Excessive or redundant effort of produc...
18 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
The 7 Wastes – Defects
Defects
Definition: Repair or rework of a product or service to fulfill cus...
19 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
The 7 Wastes – Summary
In the latest edition of the Lean Manufacturing
classic Lean Thinking, Unde...
20 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Lean Management – The Five Lean Principles
Define Value - Specify value from the Customer
perspect...
21 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Lean Management – Kaizen Events
Process Changeover Reduction or SMED Activities
are best implement...
22 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Lean Management – Kaizen Events
 Kaizen
– Continuous, incremental improvements
– Should not take ...
23 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Kaizen Events – Preparation Phase
 Define the strategic or operational purpose, objectives and de...
24 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
• Project
Charter
• Business
Impact
• Current
Challenges
• Current
Standard
Procedures
• Tools &
T...
25 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Phase 1: General Training & Lean Thinking
 All participants need a basic foundation of Lean train...
26 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Phase 1: Specific Training & Data Review
 Review event scope and goals / Charter
 Explain the to...
27 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Team Briefing
on:
Project-Specific
Training
●
Measure &
Analyze Current
Work Process
●
Identify Cu...
28 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Phase 2: Analyze Current Process
 Measure and analyze the current process work
 Capture the curr...
29 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Team Briefing
on:
Project-Specific
Training
●
Measure &
Analyze Current
Work Process
●
Identify Cu...
30 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Phase 3: Simulate & Finalize Improvements
 Try out the best ideas from Phase 2
 Ideally done wit...
31 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Team Briefing
on:
Project-Specific
Training
●
Measure &
Analyze Current
Work Process
●
Identify Cu...
32 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Phase 4: Improvement Evaluation
 Evaluate the improvements made (based on data!)
 Team agrees th...
33 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Team Briefing
on:
Project-Specific
Training
●
Measure &
Analyze Current
Work Process
●
Identify Cu...
34 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Phase 5: Report Out & Celebration
 Confirm that the event has met its objectives
 Present result...
35 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Kaizen Events – 30 Day Action Plan
 Follow up on the actions identified that could not be complet...
36 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Kaizen Events – Causes of Failure
 Many Kaizen events end up as nothing but a “show” with
limited...
37 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – Quick Changeover or SMED
 Quick Changeover or Single-Minute Exchange of Die (S...
38 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – Changeover Examples
 Software Implementation
 Reduce the time between the las...
39 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – Basic Concept
 Changeover or setup activities can be classified using the foll...
40 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – Sources of Waste
Sources of Waste during a Changeover Process include
 Searchi...
41 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – Sources of Waste
 Checking personal notes on gauge values.
 Searching for pal...
42 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – Sources of Waste Pareto
0
10
20
30
40
50
Adjustment Away
From
Machine
Preparati...
43 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
1. Observe the
Current Methodology
Results
Satisfactory
?
Stop
Yes
No
Quick Changeover – A Step-by...
44 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – A Step-by-Step Process
There are seven basic steps to reducing changeover using...
45 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – Step 1: Observe Current Process
1. Observe the current Changeover Process
 I f...
46 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Advantages of videotaping a Changeover Process prior to the Kaizen
Event includes
Quick Changeover...
47 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – Step 2: Separate Activities
2. Separate the Internal and External Activities
 ...
48 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
EQUIPMENT: DATE: PAGE: OF
PROCESS /PROJECT: PREPARED BY:
OPERATION CLASSIFICATION IMPROVEMENT REVI...
49 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – Step 3: Convert Activities
3. Convert Internal Activities into External Activit...
50 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – Step 4: Internal Activities
4. Streamline and simplify the remaining Internal A...
51 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Once the setup begins, participants never leave
the area !!!
52 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
50 Ton Press
Raw
Material
Store setup tools at
the site
Have raw material
nearby and handy Mark an...
53 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – Reducing Internal Activity Time
Nuts & Bolts are the enemy … The drawing shows ...
54 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – Reducing Internal Activity Time
Side guider – take time
to tighten in the screw...
55 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – Reducing Internal Activity Time
An example of use elimination and method substi...
56 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – Step 5: External Activities
5. Streamline and simplify the External Activities
...
57 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – Setup Tool Cart as Kitting Set
Checklist for setup
Special instructions
Measure...
58 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – Organize and Store in Proximity
Slot address labels
Slot
address
Model Slide
va...
59 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – Step 6: Document & Standardize
6. Document and implement the new Changeover Pro...
60 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Quick Changeover – Step 7: “Do it all again.”
7. “Do it all again”
 Based on our experience, it i...
61 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Identify a changeover or set-up process in your
organization where you think the Quick Changeover
...
62 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Keep in Mind …
The only person who likes change is a WET BABY!
63 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
The FIRST STEP is always the HARDEST.
Remember …
64 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
The End …
“Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection we can catch
excellence.” - Vi...
65 April 9, 2016 – v2.0
Terms & Conditions
After you have downloaded the training material to your own
computer, you can c...
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Lean Quick Changeover (SMED) Training Module

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The Lean Quick Changeover (SMED) Training Module v2.0 includes:

1. MS PowerPoint Presentation including 65 slides covering an Introduction to Lean Management, The Seven Lean Wastes, Lean Kaizen Events, and a Step-by-Step Changeover Time Reduction (SMED) Process.

2. MS Excel Changeover Time Analysis Worksheet Template

Published in: Business
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Lean Quick Changeover (SMED) Training Module

  1. 1. 1 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Lean Quick Changeover (SMED) Process by Operational Excellence Consulting LLC
  2. 2. 2 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Lean Management – Lean Thinking “One of the most noteworthy accomplishments in keeping the price of Ford products low is the gradual shortening of the production cycle. The longer an article is in the process of manufacture and the more it is moved about, the greater is its ultimate cost.” Henry Ford, 1863 – 1947 “All we are doing is looking at the time line, from the moment the customer gives us an order to the point when we collect the cash. We are reducing the time line by reducing the non-value added activities.” Taiichi Ohno, 1912 – 1990
  3. 3. 3 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Lean Management – A little Bit of History Eli Whitney developed the concept of interchangeable parts around 1799 when he accepted an order from the U.S. Army for the manufacture of 10,000 muskets at the unbelievably low price of $13.40 each. For the next 100 years manufacturers primarily concerned themselves with individual technologies. During this time engineering drawings developed, modern machine tools were perfected and large scale pro- cesses (e.g. the Bessemer process for making steel) held the center of attention. That changed in the late 1890s.
  4. 4. 4 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Lean Management – A little Bit of History In the late 1890s, Frederick W. Taylor began to look at individual workers and work methods. The result was time study and standardized work. He called his ideas Scientific Manage- ment. The concept of applying science to management was sound but Taylor simply ignored the behavioral sciences. Frank Gilbreth added motion study and invented process charting. Process Charting focused attention on all work elements including those non-value added elements which occur between the "official" elements. Lillian Gilbreth brought psychology into the mix by studying the motivations of workers and how attitudes affected the outcome of a process.
  5. 5. 5 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Lean Management – A little Bit of History Starting about 1910, Henry Ford fashioned the first comprehensive Manufacturing Strategy. He took all the elements of a manufacturing system -- people, machines, tooling, and products -- and arranged them in a continuous system for manufac- turing the Model T automobile. Ford is considered by many to be the first practitioner of Just-In-Time (JIT) and Lean Manufacturing. Ford's success inspired many others to copy his methods. But most of those who copied did not understand the fundamentals. Ford assembly lines were often employed for products and processes that were unsuitable for them.
  6. 6. 6 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Lean Management – A little Bit of History After WW II, Japan started to study American production methods with particular attention to Ford practices and the Statistical Quality Control practices of Ishikawa, Edwards Deming, and Joseph Juran. At Toyota Motor Company, Taiichi Ohno and Shigeo Shingo, began to incorporate Ford production and other techniques into an approach called Toyota Production System (TPS) or Just-In-Time (JIT). Toyota also “discovered” that factory workers had far more to contribute than just muscle power and developed the concept of Quality Circles. All of this took place between about 1949 and 1975.
  7. 7. 7 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Lean Management – A little Bit of History In 1990 James Womack wrote a book called "The Machine That Changed The World". Womack's book was a straight- forward account of the history of automobile manufacturing combined with a comparative study of Japa- nese, American, and European auto- motive assembly plants. What was new was a term - "Lean Manufacturing“.
  8. 8. 8 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Lean Management – Three Types of Process Activities Non- Value Added Business- Value Added Value- Added Customer is not willing to pay for these activities and they should be eliminated, e.g. rework. Customer are willing to pay the organization for these activities, e.g. assembly or data entry. Customers are not willing to pay for these activities, but the organizations deems these activities as necessary, e.g. preventive maintenance. Many process have less than 20% value- added activities.
  9. 9. 9 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Key Lean Objectives: Reduce Lead Time → Eliminate or Reduce Non-Value-Added Activities Lean Management – Definition of Value Adding Work Three Criteria for Adding Value 1. Customer wants you to do it (or will pay for it) 2. The material / information is being processed or transformed into final products or services 3. It is done right the first time
  10. 10. 10 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Lean Management – How do you spend your time? • Value-Adding (VA) – increases worth of a product or service • Non-Value-Adding but Necessary (NVABN) – required to keep the organization operating, e.g. compliance • Non-Value-Adding (NVA) and Unnecessary – all other tasks not identified above • Lean Management reduces lead time through – Streamlining VA work – Minimizing NVABN work – Eliminating NVA work
  11. 11. 11 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Lean Management – The 7 Wastes The seven wastes originated in Japan, where waste is known as “muda.“ The elimination of non-value adding activities or waste is one of the most effective ways to improve customer satisfaction and increase the profitability of any business. Inventory Over-Processing Waiting Transportation Defects Motion Over-Production The 7 Wastes
  12. 12. 12 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 The 7 Wastes – Transportation Transportation Definition: Any material or information movement, mainly between processing steps, that does not directly support the creation of the product or service. Causes: Improper Facility Layout – Excessive Handoffs – Large Lot Processing – Large Lot Purchasing – Poor Workplace Organization – Large Buffers & Storage Locations – Offsite Storage Locations – Poor Scheduling – …
  13. 13. 13 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 The 7 Wastes – Inventory Inventory Definition: Any supply, i.e. raw material, work-in-process or finished good, in excess of processing requirements necessary to produce the product or service in a just-in-time manner. Causes: Inaccurate Forecasting Systems – Incapable Processes – Incapable Suppliers – Long Replenishment Lead Times – Local Optimization – Long Changeover Times – Poor Inventory Tracking – Poor Management of Work- in-Process – Unbalanced Processing Steps – …
  14. 14. 14 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 The 7 Wastes – Motion Motion Definition: Any movement, incl. searching, of people which does not contribute added value to the product or service. Causes: Ineffective Equipment, Office or Plant Layout – Lack of Visual Controls – Poor Workplace Organization – Lack of Standard Work – Poor IT System Design – Poor Process Documentation – Poor Storage Solutions – Unclear & Incomplete Instructions – …
  15. 15. 15 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 The 7 Wastes – Waiting Waiting Definition: Idle time that occurs when codependent processing steps or activities are not fully synchronized. Causes: Inconsistent Work Methods – Lack of Proper Equipment & Materials – Long Setup Times – Low Man & Machine Effectiveness – Poor Equipment Maintenance – Skills Monopolies – Unnecessary Handovers – Production Bottlenecks – Unnecessary Approvals – …
  16. 16. 16 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 The 7 Wastes – Over-Production Over-Production Definition: Producing more than is needed, faster than needed and before it is needed. Causes: Incapable Processes – Poor Planning & Scheduling – Low Uptime – Lengthy Setup Times – Local Optimization – Cost Accounting Practices – Lack of Communication – Unnecessary Reports – Duplicative Data Entry – …
  17. 17. 17 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 The 7 Wastes – Over-Processing Over-Processing Definition: Excessive or redundant effort of production and communication which adds no value to the final product or service. Causes: Decision Making at Inappropriate levels – Unclear Roles & Responsibilities – Too many Handoffs – Inefficient Policies & Procedures – Poor Configuration Controls – Spurious Quality Standards – Lack of Customer Input – Unclear Customer Requirements – Unproductive Meetings – Expediting – Firefighting – Changing Priorities – …
  18. 18. 18 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 The 7 Wastes – Defects Defects Definition: Repair or rework of a product or service to fulfill customer requirements, as well as scrap waste resulting from materials deemed to be un-repairable or un-reworkable. Causes: Excessive Process Variation – High Inventory Levels – Incapable Processes – Inadequate Tools & Equipment – Insufficient Training – Insufficient Mistake Proofing – Unnecessary Handing – Unclear & Incomplete Customer Requirements – …
  19. 19. 19 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 The 7 Wastes – Summary In the latest edition of the Lean Manufacturing classic Lean Thinking, Underutilization of Employees has been added as an eighth waste. Organizations employ their staff for their nimble fingers and strong muscles but forget they come to work everyday with a free brain. It is only by capitalizing on employees' creativity that organizations can eliminate the other seven wastes and continuously improve their performance. Many changes over recent years have driven organizations to become world class organizations or Lean Enterprises. The first step in achieving that goal is to identify and attack the seven wastes. As Toyota and other world-class organizations have come to realize, Customers will pay for value added work, but never for waste.
  20. 20. 20 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Lean Management – The Five Lean Principles Define Value - Specify value from the Customer perspective. Map Value Stream - Identify the value stream for each product or service and challenge all of the non-value adding steps (wastes) currently necessary to create and deliver this product or service. Add nothing than value. Create Flow - Make the product or service creation and delivery process flow through the remaining value-added steps. Establish Pull – Introduce pull between all process steps where continuous flow is possible. Pursuit Perfection – Manage toward perfection so that the number of steps and the amount of time and information needed to create and deliver this product or service.
  21. 21. 21 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Lean Management – Kaizen Events Process Changeover Reduction or SMED Activities are best implemented using Lean Kaizen Events.
  22. 22. 22 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Lean Management – Kaizen Events  Kaizen – Continuous, incremental improvements – Should not take longer than 3 – 5 days, excluding preparation – Example: Reduce equipment set-up time, improve order management process, reduce motion waste in specific work area, implement 5S Visual Workplace Organization in specific work area, … – Also called “Point Kaizen” and “Process Kaizen” Kai → “to take apart and put back together” Zen → “to think about it” “Kaizen is the opposite of complacency.” John A. Young, CEO of Hewlett Packard
  23. 23. 23 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Kaizen Events – Preparation Phase  Define the strategic or operational purpose, objectives and deliverables  Formulate event drivers, e.g. current state issues and challenges  Establish metrics and obtain current baseline data  Ensure the Sponsor’s commitment & engagement  Have sponsor kick off the event and set expectations  Keep the sponsor informed and engaged throughout the event  Sponsor approve the team’s recommendations  Assists in implementing solutions and any follow-up actions  Leads celebration of successful event  Develop project description & define event scope (physical boundaries)  Identify and address potential obstacles and risks  …
  24. 24. 24 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 • Project Charter • Business Impact • Current Challenges • Current Standard Procedures • Tools & Techniques Team Briefing on: Phase 1 Kaizen Events – Day 1 or Phase 1
  25. 25. 25 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Phase 1: General Training & Lean Thinking  All participants need a basic foundation of Lean training  Team members need a common language  This training is often completed prior to the event  Minimum awareness required for all team members:  Lean Thinking and basic concepts  What is waste  5S mentality  Event ground rules  This will become less necessary over time, but a brief review is advisable even for experienced teams
  26. 26. 26 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Phase 1: Specific Training & Data Review  Review event scope and goals / Charter  Explain the tools and methods to be used in the event  Event / project specific training as required  Review any data or tools already available  Previous Kaizen event or Six Sigma project findings  5S work that has been done in the area  VSM and Cycle Time data  Constraint and TAKT / resource data  Anything else relevant…
  27. 27. 27 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Team Briefing on: Project-Specific Training ● Measure & Analyze Current Work Process ● Identify Current Process Weakness and Quick Wins ● Formulate Improvement Plans Phase 2Phase 1 • Project Charter • Business Impact • Current Challenges • Current Standard Procedures • Tools & Techniques Kaizen Events – Day 2 or Phase 2
  28. 28. 28 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Phase 2: Analyze Current Process  Measure and analyze the current process work  Capture the current process  Analyze the process for Non-Value Added tasks  Formulate process improvements  Brainstorm the opportunities  Identify potential solutions  Determine which idea(s) will be tried first Any of the tools of Lean and Six Sigma can be used to accomplish these objectives within a Kaizen event
  29. 29. 29 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Team Briefing on: Project-Specific Training ● Measure & Analyze Current Work Process ● Identify Current Process Weakness and Quick Wins ● Formulate Improvement Plans Simulate & Finalize Improvements ● Implement Improvements ● Evaluate Improvements • Project Charter • Business Impact • Current Challenges • Current Standard Procedures • Tools & Techniques Kaizen Events – Day 3 or Phase 3 Phase 1 Phase 2 Phase 3
  30. 30. 30 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Phase 3: Simulate & Finalize Improvements  Try out the best ideas from Phase 2  Ideally done within the actual process environment  If not possible, use simulations or test areas  Fine tune the improvements  Keep looking for better ways  Attack whatever waste you can find  Finalize the data and metrics to evaluate the change
  31. 31. 31 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Team Briefing on: Project-Specific Training ● Measure & Analyze Current Work Process ● Identify Current Process Weakness and Quick Wins ● Formulate Improvement Plans Establish New Standard Process ● Operate Using New Standard Process ● Finalize New Standard Process ● Establish Process Controls Simulate & Finalize Improvements ● Implement Improvements ● Evaluate Improvements Phase 4Phase 1 Phase 2 Phase 3 • Project Charter • Business Impact • Current Challenges • Current Standard Procedures • Tools & Techniques Kaizen Events – Day 4 or Phase 4
  32. 32. 32 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Phase 4: Improvement Evaluation  Evaluate the improvements made (based on data!)  Team agrees that changes are final (for this event)  Ensure all 5S elements have been addressed  Document the new procedures  Write or modify standard procedures  Include visual work instructions wherever possible  Test the new procedures under real world conditions  Finalize and define training plans as required  Include ongoing maintenance and Control Plans
  33. 33. 33 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Team Briefing on: Project-Specific Training ● Measure & Analyze Current Work Process ● Identify Current Process Weakness and Quick Wins ● Formulate Improvement Plans Establish New Standard Process ● Operate Using New Standard Process ● Finalize New Standard Process ● Establish Process Controls Simulate & Finalize Improvements ● Implement Improvements ● Evaluate Improvements • Project Charter • Business Impact • Current Challenges • Current Standard Procedures • Tools & Techniques Kaizen Events – Day 5 or Phase 5 Present Results ● Agree on Next Steps ● Celebrate! Phase 5Phase 4Phase 2 Phase 3Phase 1
  34. 34. 34 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Phase 5: Report Out & Celebration  Confirm that the event has met its objectives  Present results and action plans to Leadership  Obtain final approvals as required  Plan for follow up Kaizen events  Celebrate the success of the event  Communicate the achievements widely
  35. 35. 35 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Kaizen Events – 30 Day Action Plan  Follow up on the actions identified that could not be completed within the event  Ensure the implementation is done and maintained  Do not allow the actions to drag beyond 30 days  Identify room for further improvement  Other Kaizen events  Lean, Six Sigma, or other projects Take no action and nothing will happen (not seeing is not knowing)
  36. 36. 36 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Kaizen Events – Causes of Failure  Many Kaizen events end up as nothing but a “show” with limited to no tangible and sustainable results  Common reasons for failure include:  Management team has ‘no time’ to attend event; only wants to see results  Management will not accept ideas that do not fit their preconceived notions  Conducting the event without sufficient training or preparation  Interruptions and distractions during the event  No monitoring after event completion  …
  37. 37. 37 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – Quick Changeover or SMED  Quick Changeover or Single-Minute Exchange of Die (SMED) provides a rapid and efficient way of setting up or converting a process from running the current product to running the next product.  Rapid changeovers are a key to reducing processing lot sizes and improving flow.  The phrase "single-minute" does not mean that all changeovers and setups should take only one minute, but that they should take less than 10 minutes (in other words, "single-digit minute").
  38. 38. 38 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – Changeover Examples  Software Implementation  Reduce the time between the last successful use of the old software and the first successful use of the new version  Maintenance or website downtime  Hospitals and Hotels  Change over beds or rooms from one patient to the next  Changing over the operating room from one surgery to the next  Airlines  Changing the plane over for the next flight  Race Car Pit Crew  In and out of the pit within less than 3 seconds
  39. 39. 39 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – Basic Concept  Changeover or setup activities can be classified using the following three categories.  Waste – Activities which do not add value to the changeover or setup  Internal - Activities that can only be performed while the equipment is shut down  External - Activities that can be performed without shutting down the equipment  Key strategies to reduce setup and changeover time are:  Eliminate the waste activities  Convert as many internal activities to external activities  Internal activities can be improved by:  Use specially designed cart to organize tools  Use quick-release fasteners instead of bolts and nuts  Use stoppers to quickly position the jigs.  Use overhang mechanisms to handle heavy jigs  Use locating pins and holes to eliminate the adjustment
  40. 40. 40 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – Sources of Waste Sources of Waste during a Changeover Process include  Searching for, finding, lining up, and transporting changeover tools.  Waiting for materials, especially for missing items.  Searching for bolts, nuts and washers.  Searching for carts or waiting for an available crane.  Searching for dies, fixtures.  Finding chutes and searching for their bolts.  Searching for gauges.  Searching for inspection or measurement tools.  Checking technical drawings or manufacturing specifications.
  41. 41. 41 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – Sources of Waste  Checking personal notes on gauge values.  Searching for pallets.  Searching for product containers.  Searching for a conveyor or other transporter.  …
  42. 42. 42 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – Sources of Waste Pareto 0 10 20 30 40 50 Adjustment Away From Machine Preparation Setup Special Problems Percent Total Time
  43. 43. 43 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 1. Observe the Current Methodology Results Satisfactory ? Stop Yes No Quick Changeover – A Step-by-Step Process 2. Separate the Internal and External Activities 3. Convert Internal Activities into External Activities 4. Streamline the remaining Internal Activities 5. Streamline the External Activities 6. Document the New Procedure 7. Do it all Again !
  44. 44. 44 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – A Step-by-Step Process There are seven basic steps to reducing changeover using the SMED system: 1. OBSERVE the current methodology (A) 2. Separate the INTERNAL and EXTERNAL activities (B). 3. CONVERT (where possible) internal activities into external ones (C) (pre- heating of tools is a good example of this). 4. STREAMLINE the remaining internal activities, by simplifying them (D). Focus on fixings – For example, it is only the last turn of a bolt that tightens it - the rest is just movement (waste). 5. STREAMLINE the external activities, so that they are of a similar scale to the internal ones (D). 6. DOCUMENT the new procedure, and actions that are yet to be completed. 7. DO IT ALL AGAIN: For each iteration of the above process, a 25-35% improvement in set-up times should be expected, so it may take several iterations to cross the ten minute line.
  45. 45. 45 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – Step 1: Observe Current Process 1. Observe the current Changeover Process  I find it often very helpful to start a Quick Changeover reduction initiative by actually videotaping the major activities currently performed during the changeover process and to review the video with the improvement team.  The key outputs of this first step are to document each step of the changeover process, as well as determine the cycle time of each step and for the entire changeover process. A simple Excel spreadsheet will normally be sufficient to document the results of this and the following steps.
  46. 46. 46 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Advantages of videotaping a Changeover Process prior to the Kaizen Event includes Quick Changeover – Video Taping  The process can be reviewed (replayed) over and over again for study.  The setup person does not have to be disturbed to explain the steps while the setup is in process.  Operators observing their own actions are more candid and not defensive.  It is not necessary to record on paper every detail of the setup. Sections can be reserved for later study.  Time studies have a bad name, the video procedure is not a time study!  …
  47. 47. 47 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – Step 2: Separate Activities 2. Separate the Internal and External Activities  Once the team has a clear understanding of the key activities involved in a changeover, each step needs to be classified using one of the following three categories.  Waste – Activities which do not add value to the changeover or setup  Internal - Activities that can only be performed while the equipment is shut down  External - Activities that can be performed without shutting down the equipment  The results will be documented in the same spreadsheet created in Step 1.
  48. 48. 48 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 EQUIPMENT: DATE: PAGE: OF PROCESS /PROJECT: PREPARED BY: OPERATION CLASSIFICATION IMPROVEMENT REVISED TIME NO. STEP ELEMENT CUMLATIVE INT EXT WASTE IDEA INT EXT COMPL CURRENT TIME Quick Changeover – Changeover Reduction Form
  49. 49. 49 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – Step 3: Convert Activities 3. Convert Internal Activities into External Activities (where possible)  During this step, the team identifies internal changeover activities, means activities that are currently performed while the equipment is shut down, that can be converted into external activities, means they can be performed before or after the equipment shutdown. This can include, organizing all the tools needed for the changeover or pre-assembling of tools prior to the equipment shutdown.
  50. 50. 50 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – Step 4: Internal Activities 4. Streamline and simplify the remaining Internal Activities  In Step 4 the team focuses on those activities that currently need to be performed during the equipment shut down, means the internal activities, and develops solutions to simplify or speed up those activities.  Examples include,  it is only the last turn of a bolt that tightens it - the rest is just movement (waste)  usage of quick-release fasteners instead of bolts and nuts  usage of stoppers to quickly position jigs  usage of locating pins and holes to eliminate time consuming adjustments
  51. 51. 51 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Once the setup begins, participants never leave the area !!!
  52. 52. 52 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 50 Ton Press Raw Material Store setup tools at the site Have raw material nearby and handy Mark and arrange tools for easy identification Quick Changeover – Organize your Work Area …
  53. 53. 53 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – Reducing Internal Activity Time Nuts & Bolts are the enemy … The drawing shows a simple modification made to the terminal nut by welding oversized wings on it for better torque tightening by hand - no tools required … Before After
  54. 54. 54 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – Reducing Internal Activity Time Side guider – take time to tighten in the screw Just slot in & tighten Before After The machine shown in this slide has two side guides that need to be tightened by eight screws during each changeover. A project team implementing SMED decided to eliminate tightening the screws by fixing them in place, and a slot was cut to align the guide quickly and reduce process time.
  55. 55. 55 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – Reducing Internal Activity Time An example of use elimination and method substitution by eliminating the need for nuts, bolts, wrenches and other hand tools. The use of toggle clamps instead of using bolts, washers and hand tools to secure tooling in place.
  56. 56. 56 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – Step 5: External Activities 5. Streamline and simplify the External Activities  In Step 5 the team focuses now on the external activities, means activities that can be performed before or after the equipment shut down, and develops solutions to simplify or speed up those activities.  Examples include  the usage of specially designed cart to organize tools,  the usage of overhang mechanisms to handle heavy jigs, or  the training of line operators to perform specific changeover tasks.
  57. 57. 57 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – Setup Tool Cart as Kitting Set Checklist for setup Special instructions Measurement jigs, tools, gauges, set blocks, etc. Dies
  58. 58. 58 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – Organize and Store in Proximity Slot address labels Slot address Model Slide value Part Line #Cover Block gauge #
  59. 59. 59 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – Step 6: Document & Standardize 6. Document and implement the new Changeover Process  Once a new and improved Changeover Process has been established, it needs to be properly documented, all employees involved need to be trained, and a new baseline for the new reduced total changeover time needs to be established.
  60. 60. 60 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Quick Changeover – Step 7: “Do it all again.” 7. “Do it all again”  Based on our experience, it is not uncommon for an organization to reduce changeover time by 30 – 50% after a successful changeover reduction project or a series of smaller Kaizen events.
  61. 61. 61 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Identify a changeover or set-up process in your organization where you think the Quick Changeover or SMED methodology can be applied. How? How long is your current changeover or set-up time?
  62. 62. 62 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Keep in Mind … The only person who likes change is a WET BABY!
  63. 63. 63 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 The FIRST STEP is always the HARDEST. Remember …
  64. 64. 64 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 The End … “Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection we can catch excellence.” - Vince Lombardi
  65. 65. 65 April 9, 2016 – v2.0 Terms & Conditions After you have downloaded the training material to your own computer, you can change any part of the course material and remove all logos and references to Operational Excellence Consulting. You can share the material with your colleagues and re-use it as you need. The main restriction is that you cannot distribute, sell, rent or license the material as though it is your own. These training course materials are for your — and your organization's — usage only. Thank you.

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