Infrastructure components configure and deploy 24 hiapc fabrizio volpe

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Infrastructure components configure and deploy

In collaboration with IEEE Computer Society, the Cloud Security Alliance and Dell, Microsoft is hosting a 24 Hours in a Private Cloud virtual event

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  • Buongiorno and welcome to 24 hours in a private cloudMy name is Fabrizio Volpe and my session is focused on the configuration and deployment of the infrastructure components that you need to turn your datacenter into a private cloud. I’ll try to explain the concepts and to show as many demo as possible to give you an “hands on” impression of the Microsoft solutions (System Center 2012 products) that can help you in the transition from simple virtualization to cloud provisioning your resources
  • Cloud Computing is emerging as a major disruptive force in shaping the nature of business. Cloud Computing enables what we call “IT as a Service” which represents IT as being delivered to the business in a manner that’s agile and cost-effective while meeting the quality of service Quality of service parameters that the business has come to expect today.
  • The image gives you a graphical impression of the “functional definition” that the National Institute of standard and technology has given of cloud computing. During MMS 2012 a few days ago Brad Anderson has listed four questions to help you understand if you’re really working in a cloud model. Allowing end users to self provision is one of four distinguishing characteristics of how private cloud computing is different from simply establishing banks of virtualized servers in the data center. In addition to self service, Anderson offered three tests of whether you've implemented a cloud model: Do think about your resources (servers, storage, networking) in a pooled fashion rather than as individual entities? Can you provide elasticity in services and applications, so that they can expand with demand and contract when it goes away? Can you track usage so that you can show back or charge back to users, or user departments, the compute power they are using?
  • The Microsoft approach to Infrastructure as a Service is to streamline cloud deployments for IT pros. Microsoft does this by taking different resources and logically abstracting them to the cloud, using the same methods to deploy different hypervisors, and delegating cloud access and control. Microsoft also provides cloud-based delegation of resources, and quota controls over resource usage.The result is that the underlying infrastructure fabric of networking, storage, and computers—including different hypervisors—can be configured as resources in private clouds. These clouds can be delegated to individual users with distinct quotas.
  • IT as a Service is the mental model around which the app leader and the ops leader come together as consumer and provider respectively. So what does this cloud transformation mean to the enterprise)? Let’s go back to the two personas we defined before. The different needs and the service framework we talked about, the common management experience and the flexible it as a service require software products that are cloud oriented and that are able to group and abstract resources from internal datacenters and from external service providers   Through System Center 2012 you’re enabled to deploy your Private Cloud infrastructure from the different fabric resources in your datacenter. Deploy your compute fabric through bare metal OS deployments of Hyper-V servers. Discover, classify, and allocate my storage fabric for Private Cloud use. Abstract my networking fabric for use in my Private Cloud. Pull these fabric resources together and create cluster for use as the underlying infrastructure for the Private Cloud.
  • 41 percent of Microsoft customers are using services across datacenters on premises and in public clouds. 80 percent of Microsoft customers over the next three to five years will use hybrid models. Let’s start with the definitive evolution that's happening within IT.Customers are increasingly considering cloud computing models (versus just deploying physical and virtual environments). If you’re referring to Infrastructure as a Service (private cloud), you're thinking about your datacenter as a set of pooled resources (including compute, network and storage), not in terms of individual hosts or VMs.If you’re referring to public cloud, you're talking about building applications that will then be delivered as a service. The platform provides all the required building blocks for your app. Think Windows Azure. Between private and public cloud, we believe that the concept of delivering IT as a Service will transform how customers consume IT and will deliver a completely new cost structure at a much higher level of business responsiveness.hybrid environments will become the norm over the next few years. A common toolset with integrated physical, virtual, Private, and Public cloud management will help you optimize your return on investment.  
  • What we’re going to first discuss are the capabilities required to deliver a private cloud as well as leverage hybrid computing models. <click> Firstly, you need a “simple” self-service experience to enable your application owners specify their service requirements. Let’s say the “consumer” trying to provision a SharePoint service with the following spec: 3 tier .NET architectureHas a set of configuration and deployment parameters to conform with (e.g. perf thresholds, scale out rules, update domains)Needs 99.95% availability SLAAdheres to compliance/security Need on-demand reporting on key availability metrics that track against SLA<click> Next, you need a way to understand the topology and architecture of the application service in question. An application deployed in cloud computing model is called a “service”. This would necessitate a “service model” that accurately binds the application’s architecture to the underlying resources where it will be hosted. The “service model” would be comprised of: Service definition information, deployed as “roles”. Roles are like DLLs, i.e. a collection of code with an entry point that runs in its own virtual machineFront end: e.g. load-balanced stateless web serversMiddle worker tier: e.g. order processing, encodingBackend storage: e.g. SQL tables or filesService Configuration informationUpdate domainsAvailability domains Scale out rules<click> You will need a set of process automation capabilities to break down this application provisioning request into the enterprise change requests that need to be implemented. This could include setting up the underlying infra and then a set of app configuration/release requests that need to be tracked (and ideally implemented with orchestrated automation)<click> Next you need a set of provisioning tools that actually configure and deploy the infra and application layers.<click> the underlying datacenter resources could be physical, virtual, private or public as per the requirements dictated by the application’s service model <click> once the application service is deployed, it would immediately need to be “discovered” and monitored for reporting and health tracking
  • <click> There you see how the System Center 2012 components offer these life cycle management capabilities in combination to help you deliver hybrid IT as a Service as per your organization’s requirements: App Controller would offer that self-service experience that allows your application owners manage their apps across private and public environments. Service Manager offers the standardized self-service catalog that defines “templates” for your applications and infrastructure. App Controller, Virtual Machine Manager, Service Manager and Operations Manager work together to maintain the service model through the application service life cycleOrchestrator and Service Manager offer orchestrated automation for the process workflows required to drive your provisioning and monitoring toolsVirtual Machine Manager and Configuration manager can provision physical, virtual and cloud environmentsOperations Manager (AVIcode capabilities will be built into Operations Manager) monitors your application services end to end and offers deep app insight to help you deliver predictable SLAYour datacenter resources could be deployed anywhere from physical boxes to virtual to private to public with Windows Server/ Hyper-V and Windows Azure However, to get to this agile self-service end-state, you will have to start with abstracting your infrastructure and allocating it appropriately so that your business units can deploy and manage their applications on top. We will see how in the subsequent sections of this presentation.  
  • System Center 2012 cloud and data center management solutions empower you with a common management toolset for your private and public cloud applications and services. System Center helps you confidently deliver IT as a Service for your business.System Center 2012 helps your organization consume and deliver IT as a Service by enabling productive infrastructure, predictable applications, and cloud on your terms. System Center 2012 helps you to deliver flexible and cost-effective private-cloud infrastructure to your business units in a self-service model, while carrying forward your existing data center investments. Recognizing that applications are where core business value resides, System Center 2012 offers deep application insight, which, combined with a “service-centric” approach, helps you deliver predictable application-service levels. Finally, System Center 2012 empowers you to deliver and consume private and public cloud computing on your terms with common management experiences across your hybrid environments.Productive Infrastructure System Center 2012 helps you deliver flexible and cost-effective infrastructure with what you already know and own. System Center 2012 helps you integrate heterogeneous data center investments, including multi-hypervisor environments. You can pool and abstract your data center resources and deliver self-service infrastructure to your business units in a flexible, yet controlled, manner.Heterogeneous supportTo help you carry forward your existing data center investments and skillsets, System Center 2012 offers integrated management for your heterogeneous data center environments. For example, it offers multi-hypervisor management for Microsoft Hyper-V, VMware vSphere/ESX, and Citrix XenServer with Virtual Machine Manager; cross-platform monitoring of Linux/Unix/Sun Solaris guests with Operations Manager; cross-platform configuration management for Linux and Unix servers with Configuration Manager; and integrated automation across management toolsets from vendors like HP, CA, BMC, EMC, and even VMware with Orchestrator.Process automation System Center 2012 helps you simplify and standardize your data center with a flexible process automation platform. By automating repetitive tasks, you can lower your costs and improve service reliability. With Orchestrator, you can integrate and extend your existing toolsets and build flexible workflows (or runbooks) that can span across multiple organizational silos and systems. These workflows are then executed in an orchestrated manner through the automation engine built into Orchestrator. Service Manager offers industry-standard service management capabilities (based on ITIL/MOF) which automates core organizational process workflows like incident management, problem management, change management, and release management.The new version of the product lets you build workflows to automate business processes and integrates into a single logical flow,operations performed by the operating system components, script"manufactured home", the System Center family of products and products management, configuration, monitoring and control of a thirdparty.Self-service infrastructure With the provisioning capability of Virtual Machine Manager, you can pool and abstract your data center resources (such as compute, network, and storage) into a private cloud infrastructure fabric, which can then be maintained by Virtual Machine Manager and Operations Manager. You can allocate and delegate this pooled fabric to your business unit IT organizations in a flexible, yet controlled, manner using Virtual Machine Manager. Application owners can consume capacity (and request additional capacity) in a self-service mode using the service catalog offered by Service Manager. Requests for capacity would be fulfilled using the process automation and provisioning capabilities offered by Orchestrator and Virtual Machine Manager respectively.Self-Service PortalThe new SCSM 2012 Self Service is based on SharePoint 2010 and Silverlight. This new portal has many of the requested features that SCSM 2010 didn't have, such as the simple function to allow end users to post comments on their own active Tickets (Incidents).The layout and functions on the portal itself is based upon a Service Catalog and is defined from within the console. Another function is you can configure different security setting depending on which role the user is member of (basic feature of SharePoint).Microsoft has also written custom SharePoint webpart controls, that allows easy customization for all Service Manager related webparts.
  • Predictable ApplicationsApps power your business. System Center 2012 helps you deliver predictable application service levels with deep application insight, and holistically manage your application services, which is where your core business value resides.Deep application monitoring and diagnosisOperations Manager offers deep application and transaction monitoring insight for .NET applications (and J2EE application server health) to maximize application availability and performance. Operations Manager also integrates with Microsoft Visual Studio through a connector to unlock development-to-operations collaboration, thereby helping you remediate application issues faster, which results in the delivery of predictable SLAs. Easy-to-use reporting and dashboarding allows you to track and communicate your SLAs more effectively.Comprehensive application manageability Microsoft Server Application Virtualization (SAV), a feature of Virtual Machine Manager, optimizes your modern and existing applications for private cloud deployments with sequenced state separation between the application and underlying infrastructure. SAV dramatically simplifies application servicing (such as upgrades and maintenance) with image-based configuration and management techniques that reduce administrative effort and expense. By decoupling your applications from the infrastructure, SAV helps unlock application portability as appropriate to your business needs.Configuration Manager supports SAV, thereby extending the benefits of SAV to applications and workloads that may be deployed in physical/traditional environments. Through SAV support, Configuration Manager enables easier physical-to-virtual application mobility and in-place application servicing. Service-centric approachIn a cloud computing model, a service is a deployed instance of an application along with its associated configuration and virtual infrastructure. System Center 2012 offers a service-centric approach to help you manage your application components in the context of the holistic service that it represents to the business. From provisioning services (visualization, design, composition, deployment, and configuration) to operating them (monitoring, remediation, and upgrades), we help you manage the full lifecycle. For example, Virtual Machine Manager and App Controller enable service-centric provisioning and updates while Operations Manager enables monitoring at the service level.
  • Your CloudPrivate and public cloud computing on your terms managed with a common toolset. System Center 2012 empowers you to deliver and consume private and public cloud computing on your terms, with common management experiences across your hybrid environments.Flexibility with delegation and controlConstruct and manage clouds across multiple data centers, multiple infrastructures (such as Microsoft and VMware), and service providers (Windows Azure). Provide delegated authority and tools to enable self-service flexibility across your environments. You retain control across your private and public cloud environments, which is important for enterprise security and compliance requirements while ensuring your IT pros have a key role even as your organization adopts cloud-computing models.Applications self-service across clouds System Center 2012 empowers your application and service owners with a common self-service experience across private-cloud and public-cloud computing models. With App Controller, you can experience full visibility and control of your private and public cloud applications and services, so you can confidently adopt Windows Azure as your enterprise Platform as a Service (PaaS) choice.Physical, virtual, and cloud managementSystem Center has historically been known for physical and virtual management in the data center. You can also use your familiar on-premises Operations Manager to monitor your Windows Azure applications (using the Monitoring Pack for Windows Azure Applications)—thus extending your common management experience to the cloud. App Controller provides you a single pane of glass with self-service flexibility and control for your application owners to manage their applications and services across private and public clouds, including Windows Azure.Hybrid environments will be the corporate standard for many years; a common management toolset with integrated physical, virtual, IaaS, andPaaS management will help you increase efficiency and optimize ROI.
  • System Center delivers a self-service experience for IT consumers through its service catalog allowing IT to standardize the services and offerings available for within the private cloud and allowing consumers to view and select the level of service + cost they want based on their business need. Through System Center 2012’s tight integration, the service request generated from the service catalog invokes the necessary process and systems automation activities required to deliver a consistent fulfillment of the request for the end user. In this demo, we will show you how System Center 2012 delivers this. About This VideoA Self-Service Portal is basically a Web site to be installed on a web server with ASP.NET, IIS6 Metabase Compatibility, and IIS6 WMI Compatibility Server Role Services. By accessing the Self-Service Portal, authorized users can create and operate their own virtual machines (VMs) as permitted by each user's User Roles, while the created VMs are placed in a Library Server managed by the System Center Virtual Machine Manager, or SCVMM. A User Role here is essentially a policy with membership, authorized hardware and software profiles, allowed scope of operations, and assigned templates applicable for creating and manageing VMs using Self-Service Portal. In a Self-Service Portal session, an authorized user sees only those virtual machines that the user owns or is authorized to operate upon. And as a VM is created or deleted by a user, the user's quota points are subtracted or regained with the amount of quota points that the VM is assigned in an employed template. Once a user has quota points fewer than what are needed for creating a new VM, the user has reached the maximal number of VMs allowable for the applicable User Role to create.The system requirements of components for constructing a Self-Service Portal include  Virtual Machine Host System Requirements  VMM Library Server System Requirements  VMM Self-Service Portal System Requirements
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  • As you are preparing for the Private Cloud, you have to think about how do I build the Private Cloud from the different Fabric resources that I have in my Infrastructure. I have Compute needs where I need to deploy the underlying Compute resources like bare metal OS deployments, as well as my Hyper-V Servers. I have different types of Storage within my Fabric, and I will need to be able to properly Discover, Classify, and Allocate this resource to my different Virtualized environments. I have complex Networking requirements in my datacenter which I will need to simplify for use in my Private Cloud.With all of these different Fabric Elements, I will need to be able to pull them together and create Clusters for use as the underlying infrastructure for my Private Cloud.ClusterConsolidate your infrastructure components for use in a private cloudComputeDeploy your compute resources, taking them from bare metal to fully deployed for your physical and virtualization hosts.StorageDiscover, classify, and allocate storage for use by the private cloud. Provide the correct storage for use with appropriate access.NetworkAbstract your complex networking infrastructure into logical networks for cloud use. Assign IP, virtual IP, and MAC addresses from pools and integrate with load balancers.
  • SCVMM 2012 can now manage even more hypervisors: Hyper-V, VMWare and XEN. Also it can integrate  with remote management such as iLO and SMASH. One interesting thing here is also ability for bare metal provisioning meaning that with SCVMM 2012 you can provision Hyper-V even on bare metal computers withoudt much manual work. Cluster creation with storage provisioning is also one of the interesting new features. Regarding the network management enhancements, SCVMM 2012 can now integrate with load balancers. Besides that now you can also assign IP and MAC from pools. Dynamic Optimization and new Power Management features are also important updates.And now for the two most expected features of System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2012:
  • I have multiple Hypervisors and to utilize them, I need different management toolsManage Heterogeneous HypervisorsUse the same methods to deploy Services to different HypervisorsI control the underlying infrastructure and the application owners just use itSystem Center 2012 Virtual Machine Manager
  • System Center delivers a self-service experience for IT consumers through its service catalog allowing IT to standardize the services and offerings available for within the private cloud and allowing consumers to view and select the level of service + cost they want based on their business need. Through System Center 2012’s tight integration, the service request generated from the service catalog invokes the necessary process and systems automation activities required to deliver a consistent fulfillment of the request for the end user. In this demo, we will show you how System Center 2012 delivers this. About This VideoA Self-Service Portal is basically a Web site to be installed on a web server with ASP.NET, IIS6 Metabase Compatibility, and IIS6 WMI Compatibility Server Role Services. By accessing the Self-Service Portal, authorized users can create and operate their own virtual machines (VMs) as permitted by each user's User Roles, while the created VMs are placed in a Library Server managed by the System Center Virtual Machine Manager, or SCVMM. A User Role here is essentially a policy with membership, authorized hardware and software profiles, allowed scope of operations, and assigned templates applicable for creating and manageing VMs using Self-Service Portal. In a Self-Service Portal session, an authorized user sees only those virtual machines that the user owns or is authorized to operate upon. And as a VM is created or deleted by a user, the user's quota points are subtracted or regained with the amount of quota points that the VM is assigned in an employed template. Once a user has quota points fewer than what are needed for creating a new VM, the user has reached the maximal number of VMs allowable for the applicable User Role to create.The system requirements of components for constructing a Self-Service Portal include  Virtual Machine Host System Requirements  VMM Library Server System Requirements  VMM Self-Service Portal System Requirements
  • I have multiple Hypervisors and to utilize them, I need different management toolsManage Heterogeneous HypervisorsUse the same methods to deploy Services to different HypervisorsI control the underlying infrastructure and the application owners just use itSystem Center 2012 Virtual Machine Manager
  • Goal: Provide an overview of the physical and virtual deployment capabilities of products like System Center 2012. Provide high-level guidance as to when customers would use something like System Center 2012 ConfigurationManager or System Center 2012 Virtual Machine Manager for different provisioning scenarios (For more detailed information, refer to the comparison table in the appendix).Transition from previous slideLet’s now look at System Center 2012 enabled solutions help you deal more efficiently with the deployment and configuration of resources that help you deliver IT as a service. Customer challengesI need to be able to quickly provision bare metal servers for specific workload or service usage.I have different types of storage that have different costs and I want to ensure that the correct storage is being used for my VMsI have a complex networking environment, and I don’t want to expose that complexity to folks who don’t need to know itTalking points<click> System Center 2012 cloud and datacenter management solutions empower you with a common management toolset for your physical and virtual resources. Over 80% of our customers run a mix of physical and virtual infrastructure, so they need to be able to quickly provision and configure operating systems and applications to their physical and virtual servers. <click> Many customers are already using Configuration Manager in their Datacenters to deploy operating systems and applications to their servers. Currently, even bare-metal deployment of operating systems is supported. Configuration Manager can also help ensure configuration compliance for those machinesNew in the 2012 release, Configuration Manager provides:Full unattended installation mode with media for deploymentExtensibility to automate the selection of an available task sequence<click> Recognizing that today’s datacenters are comprised of a mix of physical and virtual resources, Virtual Machine Manager supports deployment and configuration of virtual servers and Hyper-V. <click> Additionally, VMM can support the provisioning of VMs on VMware vSphere and Citrix XenServer hypervisors and clusters.
  • Show this slide if you think there will be customer questions about Configuration Manager and Virtual Machine Manager for managing datacenter assets. This slide can also be used if you need to go back to it when presenting.
  • VMM 2008 didn’t support all of that lifecycle. VMM 2012, by comparison, has gained improvements in the following areas:Out of band management: control of bare metal machine using baseboard management controller (BMC).OS deployment: provision OS with Hyper-V onto bare metal machine.Cluster creation: fully automated Hyper-V cluster creation.The goal for VMM 2012 is to discover bare metal machines and bring them to a fully provisioned state with Hyper-V enabled. To achieve that, the following functionality is incorporated into VMM 2012:VHD image-based deployment to bare metalHost profiles are used for a consistent configuration to a variety of hardwareThe Add Resource Wizard provides for selection and customisation at deployment timeOut-of-band communication and WDS/PXE allow for the bare metal computer to boot into the VMM deployment agent.Setting up the PXE server for bare metal deployment of Hyper-V requires Windows Deployment Server (WDS) on Windows Server 2008 R2 and the installation of the VMM OSD provider and agent. This provider coexists with other providers and responds to VMM-initiated PXE requests, resulting in the deployment of WinPE. I’m planning to write more about setting up the PXE server in a future blog entry.Deploying onto bare metal requires:The VHD in the VMM libraryDevice drivers for the hardware in the VMM libraryLogical network definitionStatic IP addresses from a defined VMM pool or DHCP if preferredOptional “generic” commands to do some configuration of hardware before the OS gets deployed, e.g. configuration of RAID hardwareDisk partition layout definitionOS settings… all of which builds into the Host Profile.Once you have all of the pieces in place, deploying onto bare metal looks like this:Simple, huh?In a nutshell:VMM performs an out-of-band reboot of the bare metal hardware.The bare metal server does a boot from PXE.The PXE server talks to VMM to authorise the PXE boot.The bare metal server downloads WinPE from the PXE server.If defined, the bare metal server runs any generic commands, and then configures the drive partitions.The bare metal server downloads the VHD from the library server (which can be the VMM server) and then injects the drivers.The bare metal server finishes off the customisation and joins the domain.Finally, Hyper-V is enabled.One thing about this approach is that deployment to bare metal only supports Windows Server 2008 R2 because the deployment actually sets up the host to boot from a VHD file, rather than deploying the OS “natively” onto the host’s hard drive. That shouldn’t be too big an issue as the performance of VHD is very close to that of native IO.Best practice when booting from VHD is that the VHD is of fixed size so that you know how much space is going to be required for that VHD. However, it should be noted that when booting from VHD, the page file for that operating system gets stored on the native hard drive and not in the VHD. It is therefore important that the native hard drive is big enough for that boot VHD and the page file (which will be the same size as the amount of memory in the server)
  • Premise :Hyper-V guests support two types of virtual network adapters: synthetic and emulated. The faster performing of the two, synthetic, makes use of the Hyper-V VMBus architecture and is the high-performance, native device in the VM. Synthetic devices require that the Hyper-V integration components be installed within the guest. Emulated adapters are available to all guests even if integration components are not available.Always use synthetic virtual network adapters when possible. Because there are integration services for all supported Hyper-V guest operating systems, the primary reason to use the emulated network adapter is for pre-boot execution environment (PXE) booting.You can create many virtual networks on the server running Hyper-V to provide a variety of communications channels.For example, you can create networks to provide the following:· Communications between VMs only - This type of virtual network is called a private network.· Communications between the host server and VMs- This type of virtual network is called an internal network· Communications between a VM and a physical network by creating an association to a physical network adapter on the host server. This type of virtual network is called an external network.    
  • SCVMM 2012 supports different types of load balancer vendors. The interface to integrate these load balancers from different vendors is based on PowerShell and we have worked with different various vendors like F5 and Citrix to make the providers ready for SCVMM 2012 Beta.Providers are MSI based installers and will require installation on the SCVMM 2012 server.Once you have installed them, to check the status of the providers, select “Settings”Under settings, click on the configuration Providers.Once you have installed the configuration providers, this is how they would show up in the SCVMM 2012 Admin console.In this example, both the providers for F5 and Citrix are depicted with details of version, publisher, model and manufacturer.Adding specific Load Balancers to your environmentGo to the Fabric Workspace and under the networking node, you will find the Load Balancers Node. Click on the ribbon button “Add Load Balancer”. A wizard pops up. 1. Here you will need to specify a Run as Account which is used to communicate with the load balancer instance.2. Select the host group affinity for the load balancer. 3. Select the model and manufacturerIn the example here I have selected a F5 load balancer.4. Specify the DNS address for the load balancer instance along with the port number5. Select the load balancer configuration provider based on details given in step 4.There is an optional validation for the load balancer instance.
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  • Storage ClassificationVMM 2012 can discover and communicate with your SAN arrays through the Storage Management Initiative – Specification (SMI-S) version 1.4 protocol. You can thereby classify available storage for chargeback purposes. Working with your storage vendor’s software, VMM can create logical units (both GPT and MBR) and let you assign storage to hosts or clusters as Clustered Shared Volumes (CSVs).Currently, supported storage providers include HP StorageWorks Enterprise Virtual Array (EVA), NetApp FAS and EMC Symmetrix & CLARiiON CX—more will follow. VMM also supports snapshot and clone functionality in your SAN. This lets you duplicate a LUN through a “SAN copy-capable” template to provision new VMs almost instantaneously. This integration is only available for Hyper-V platform. You’ll have to provision outside of VMM to use VMware or Citrix.
  • You can use the following procedure to create storage classifications in System Center 2012 – Virtual Machine Manager (VMM). Storage classifications enable you to assign user-defined storage classifications to discovered storage pools, typically by quality of service (QoS). For example, you could assign a classification of GOLD to storage pools that have the highest performance and availability.
  • I need to collect these Fabric Resources and build clusters for my Virtualization Environment“Zero to Cluster” – Bare Metal to Microsoft Hyper-V ClusterZero to Cluster Microsoft Hyper-V Deploy and ConfigureSingle Console for Hypervisor and Cluster ManagementSystem Center 2012 Virtual Machine Manager
  • Goal: Help ensure customers know that in the System Center 2012 release, Virtual Machine Manager now provides automated bare metal to Hyper-v cluster provisioning.Talking pointsWith the System Center 2012 release, VMM now support provisioning of a bare metal server to Hyper-V cluster in an efficient and automated way.<click> First, storage is discovered and provisioned for use with virtual machine deployments. <click> Next, network resources are defined using logical networks. IP, VIP and MAC addresses can then be assigned to new virtual machines from designated pools. <click> At this point VMM communicates with the bare metal server via a baseboard management controller or similar device which can be used to force the machine to boot and begin installing an operating system from a Windows Deployment Server. <click> Once the operating system is installed, VMM then configures Hyper-v on the new server.<click> At this point the Create cluster capability in VMM can be used to join the newly provisioned virtual machine to a cluster and connect to the configured storage and network resources – you’re done!This is pretty powerful considering how long this task could take without standardized and automated processes.DetailsNetworkDefine network using Logical NetworksAssign IP, VIP, and MAC from poolsIntegrate with load balancersStorageDiscover storage device to VM relationship Classify storage according to capabilitiesAssign new storage to Hyper-V clusterProvision new storage with VM deployment
  • CreationWizard based experienceCluster validation will be run for youAbility to skip validation and start on-demand validationAllocate cluster disks if VMM is managing storageCreate cluster-wide virtual networkFor WS08 R2 Hyper-V hosts in trusted domain onlyManagementAdd/Remove - Nodes, Cluster disks and Virtual networksDrag/drop host to add node to clusterCluster status tabShortcut to cluster validation test results from cluster status tabDeletionUn-clustered hosts remain managed as standalone hostsCluster disk will be unmasked if VMM is managing storage
  • Specify hosts from chosen host group to add to cluster.Skip validation if desired, validate later.
  • VMM detected an IP pool and logical network user selected the IP pool and was ok that we use an address from that poolVMM detected an IP pool and logical network but user wanted to specify the exact address from this poolVMM didn’t detect any IP pool and logical network it is required to provide an IP address
  • Choose from existing LUNs that have been allocated to this host groupChoose how these LUNs are formatted and whether to be treated as a Cluster Shared Volume.
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  • This click-through L200 demo is available on the private cloud launch site: http://infopedia/Pages/PrivateCloudLaunch.aspx#core
  • Infrastructure components configure and deploy 24 hiapc fabrizio volpe

    1. 1. Infrastructure ComponentsConfigure & DeployFabrizio VolpeMVP Directory Services @Fabriziovlp Fabrizio.volpe@gmx.com http://www.linkedin.com/in/fabriziov
    2. 2. Agenda Introduction Configure and Deploy Infrastructure Components • Heterogeneous Support - Multiple Hypervisors • Bare-Metal Deployment Of Compute Resources • Logical Abstraction For The Network Infrastructure • Storage Management Resources
    3. 3. INTRODUCTION
    4. 4. Are you in a Cloud Model ? Do you allow end users to self provision / self service ?Do think about your resources (servers, storage, networking) in a pooled fashion ? Can you provide elasticity in services and applications ? Can you track usage so that you can show back or charge back to users ? Brad Anderson - Microsoft Management Summit 2012 - Day One Keynote
    5. 5. IT as a Service Cloud ―As a Service‖ IT as a ServiceComputing offering by provides the definition has enables framework for a ―Service Microsoft’s vision what we Provider‖ and the servicecall ―IT as a level based a ―Service agreement Service‖ Consumer‖ Common Deliver IT as a Management Service on experiences your terms
    6. 6. Infrastructure : the Microsoft approach Take disparate resources and Streamline cloud deployments logically abstracting Fabric as a resource in private Cloud-based delegation cloud
    7. 7. Configure and Deploy Infrastructure Components
    8. 8. The Shift to Cloud Computing Physical Virtual Private Public
    9. 9. Deliver IT as a Service Configure Deploy Service Service Model Delivery & Self Service Automation App DC Owner Monitor Admin Operate Application Management Service Delivery & Automation Infrastructure Management
    10. 10. Deliver IT as a Service App DC Owner Admin
    11. 11. Demo : System Center VMM 2012 «Service Template»
    12. 12. Cloud & Data Center Management PRODUCTIVE INFRASTRUCTURE Heterogeneous Heterogeneous support support • Citrix • VMware with what you already know and own Heterogeneous support Process Self-service Process automation infrastructure automation Self-service infrastructure • SCSM 2012 Self • Orchestrator Service Portal
    13. 13. Cloud & Data Center Management PREDICTABLE APPLICATIONS Comprehensive Application application monitoring manageability • System • Microsoft Server Center Operations Application Manager 2012 Virtualization (SAV),Deep application monitoringand diagnosis Service-centricComprehensive application manageability approach • OrchestratorService-centric approach
    14. 14. Cloud & Data Center Management YOUR CLOUD Flexibility with Applications delegation and self-service across clouds control •System Center App •"Assign Cloud" Controller Flexibility with delegation Physical, and control virtual, and cloud Applications self-service across clouds management Physical, virtual, and cloud •Monitoring Pack for Windows Azure management Applications
    15. 15. Demo : Two Minutes as a Service UserImages from TechNet Wiki - Private Cloud in System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2012
    16. 16. Constructing the Private Cloud Standardized Services Delegated Development Production Capacity Assign dedicated and shared resources Cloud Abstraction Logical & Standardized Diverse Production Infrastructure Data Center One Data Center Two Development
    17. 17. Transform Your Data Center into a Private Cloud Cluster Compute Network Storage
    18. 18. System Center VMM 2012 : Fabric Management Hyper-V, Hyper-V Bare Metal VMware, Citrix Network Management Provisioning XenServer Storage Management Cluster Management Update Management Dynamic Optimization Power Management
    19. 19. Fabric Management Physical Server Manage multiple hypervisors – Hyper-V, VMware, Xen Server hardware management – IPMI, DCMI, SMASH, Custom via Provider Host provisioning – from bare-metal to Hyper-V to Cluster provisioning Network Define Logical Networks using VLANs and Subnets per datacenter location Address management for Static IPs, Load Balancer VIPs and MAC addresses Automated provisioning of Load Balancers via Provider Storage Storage Management using SMI-S Discover storage arrays and pools Classify storage based on throughput and capabilities Discover or configure LUNs and assign to hosts and clusters Rapid provisioning of VMs using snap cloning of LUNs
    20. 20. HETEROGENEOUS SUPPORT - MULTIPLEHYPERVISORSVirtual Machine Manager
    21. 21. System RequirementsVMware ESX Hosts Requirements XenServer Host Requirements• VMware vCenter Server 4.1 • XenServer 5.6 Feature Pack 1• ESXi 4.1 • XenServer SCVMM Integration Suite supplemental pack• ESX 4.1 • The SCVMM Integration Suite• ESXi 3.5 • XenServer host must be installed before adding it• ESX 3.5 to VMM 2012VMware Supported Features Citrix XenServer Supported Featureshttp://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg610683.aspx http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg610628.aspx
    22. 22. SUPPORT FOR MULTIPLE HYPERVISORS Virtual Machine Manager Host Group vCenter Server Microsoft Hyper-V VMware vSphere 4.1 Citrix XenServer 6.0
    23. 23. Demo : Heterogeneous support - multiple hypervisors
    24. 24. BARE-METAL DEPLOYMENT OFCOMPUTE RESOURCESVirtual Machine Manager Configuration Manager
    25. 25. Provision Infrastructure Configuration Manager Virtual Servers Configure Deploy Virtual Machine Manager Physical Servers
    26. 26. Virtual Machine Manager or Configuration ManagerTask Virtual Machine Manager Configuration ManagerCreate VMsDeploy OS VM and Hyper-V Host Physical MachinesBare-metal deployment Hyper-V hosts Physical MachinesPatch applications Hyper-V Host, Clusters, VMs except image-based patchingPatch OS and VMM Server Roles in Service Creation featureSoftware distCompliance Hyper-V hosts Desired Configuration Management VM templatesTemplated settings Service Templates for VMMSecurity (SCEP)Dynamic optimization
    27. 27. Bare-Metal Installation Prerequisites • The physical server must have a baseboard management controller (BMC) Remote that supports out of band managementManagementRequirements • Prepare the physical computer • Set up a PXE server in VMM 2012Prerequisites - • Set up the VMM 2012 library One-time • Create a host profileconfiguration :
    28. 28. Automated Bare-Metal Hyper-V Deploy in Action Download WINPE Boot from PXE 4 2 Run generic command execution scripts Host Group and WDS server configure partitions Customize and domain join Authorize PXE boot 3 8 contoso OOB reboot 5 Host Group 1 Enable Hyper-V VMM server Hyper-V server Hyper-V server 9 Download VHD Inject drivers Bare-metal Hyper-V server Hyper-V server VHD server 7 6 Drivers Library server Host profile 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
    29. 29. Demo : Bare Metal Deployment of Hyper-V Servers
    30. 30. LOGICAL ABSTRACTION FOR THENETWORK INFRASTRUCTUREVirtual Machine Manager
    31. 31. Abstracting Physical Network Abstracting physical network requirements into A logical network is used to organize and logical network definitions allows the architect simplify network assignments. to describe how a service should be configured You can use logical networks to describe networks with different purposes, for traffic isolation and to provision networks for different types of service-level agreements (SLAs)
    32. 32. Virtual Machine Networking Synthetic and Emulated network adapters Virtual networks Private network Internal network External network
    33. 33. Network Management LOGICAL NETWORKS • Classify network for VMs to access • Map to network topology • Allocate to hosts and clouds
    34. 34. Address Pools IP POOLS MAC POOLS VIRTUAL IP POOLS Assigned to VMs, hosts, Assigned to VMs Assigned to service tiers and virtual IPs that use a load balancer Specified use in VM Specified use in VM template creation Reserved within IP Pools template creation Checked out at VM Assigned to clouds Checked out at VM creation—assigned creation—assigns static before VM boot Checked out at service IP in VM deployment Returned on VM deletion Returned on VM deletion Returned on service deletion
    35. 35. Load Balancer Support AUTOMATION PARTNERS VIRTUAL IP TEMPLATES Connect to load balancer F5 BIG-IP Specifies preconfigured through hardware properties for configuring provider Brocade ServerIron ADX a load balancer at service deployment Assign to clouds, host Citrix NetScaler groups, and logical Specifies load balancing Microsoft Network Load networks methods—round robin, Balancer least connections, fastest Configure load balancing response method and add virtual IP on service deployment
    36. 36. Load Balancer Configuration Provider
    37. 37. Demo : Networking in System Center VMM 2012
    38. 38. StandardizedLogical Networks in the Private Cloud Services Delegated Development Capacity Production Create Logical Networks and assign them to the Networking Simple Networking Deployed services use Complex appropriate correct Logical Networkson the hosts networking Cloud Abstraction DMZ Prod DMZ Prod DMZ Prod Logical & Standardized Diverse Infrastructure Production Data Center One Data Center Two Development
    39. 39. STORAGE MANAGEMENTVirtual Machine Manager
    40. 40. THE FANTASTIC 12 OFMicrosoft Management Summit 2012 : Virtual Machine Manager 2012: Cool Things You Can Do with Storage
    41. 41. Demo : Storage Discovery and Classification
    42. 42. ―ZERO TO CLUSTER‖ THE FOUNDATIONFOR YOUR PRIVATE CLOUDVirtual Machine Manager
    43. 43. Zero to Hyper-V Cluster Configure Boot and install Hyper-V cluster VMM Server Bare-Metal Server Configure Configure network storage Storage Network
    44. 44. Host Clusters Bring the Fabric Together CREATION MANAGEMENT DELETION Use wizard-based Add and remove nodes, Clustered hosts will experience cluster disks, and become managed virtual networks standalone hosts Support cluster validation Drag and drop host to Clustered disks will be add node to cluster returned to managed Allocate cluster disks storage from managed storage Monitor cluster health and status Create cluster-wide virtual network
    45. 45. Add Nodes from Host Group Specify hosts from chosen host group to add to cluster. Skip validation. If desired, validate later.
    46. 46. Configurable IP Addressing on Cluster Creation Detected IP pool and Logical Network. Administrator selected the IP pool, and used an assigned address from the pool. Detected IP pool and Logical Network. Administrator manually specified the exact address from this pool. Neither an IP pool nor a Logical Network discovered. Administrator assigned manual IP address.
    47. 47. Assign Storage on Cluster Creation Assign existing LUNs allocated to host group. Enable CSV support for cluster shared volumes.
    48. 48. StandardizedConstructing the Private Cloud Services Delegated Development Capacity Production Assign dedicated and shared resources Cloud Abstraction Logical & Standardized Diverse Infrastructure Production Data Center One Data Center Two Development
    49. 49. Resourceshttp://www.microsoft.com/en-us/server-cloud/new.aspx http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki
    50. 50. Resourceshttp://www.microsoftvirtualacademy.com/tracks/system-center-virtual-machine-manager-2012-
    51. 51. 24 Hours in aPrivate Cloud

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