Membrane biology

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Membrane biology

  1. 1. Membrane Biology
  2. 2. Plasma Membrane Structure and Function• The plasma membrane separates the internal environment of the cell from its surroundings.• The plasma membrane is a phospholipid bilayer with embedded proteins.• The plasma membrane has a fluid consistency and a mosaic pattern of embedded proteins.
  3. 3. Fluid-mosaic model of membrane structure
  4. 4. • Cells live in fluid environments, with water inside and outside the cell.• Hydrophilic (water-loving) polar heads of the phospholipid molecules lie on the outward-facing surfaces of the plasma membrane.• Hydrophobic (water-fearing) nonpolar tails extend to the interior of the plasma membrane.
  5. 5. • Plasma membrane proteins may be peripheral proteins or integral proteins.• Aside from phospholipid, cholesterol is another lipid in animal plasma membranes; related steroids are found in plants.• Cholesterol strengthens the plasma membrane.
  6. 6. Functions of membrane proteins• Membrane proteins have a variety of functions.• Some help to transport materials across the membrane.• Others receive specific molecules, such as hormones.• Still other membrane proteins function as enzymes.
  7. 7. Channel protein
  8. 8. Carrier protein
  9. 9. Cell recognition protein
  10. 10. Receptor protein
  11. 11. The Permeability of the Plasma Membrane• The plasma membrane is differentially permeable.• Macromolecules cannot pass through because of size, and tiny charged molecules do not pass through the nonpolar interior of the membrane.• Small, uncharged molecules pass through the membrane, following their concentration gradient.
  12. 12. How molecules cross the plasma membrane
  13. 13. • Movement of materials across a membrane may be passive or active.• Passive transport does not use chemical energy; diffusion and facilitated transport are both passive.• Active transport requires chemical energy and usually a carrier protein.• Exocytosis and endocytosis transport macromolecules across plasma membranes using vesicle formation, which requires energy.
  14. 14. Diffusion and Osmosis• Diffusion is the passive movement of molecules from a higher to a lower concentration until equilibrium is reached.• Gases move through plasma membranes by diffusion.
  15. 15. Process of diffusion

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