Ena & Sarah
    Shows economic growth (employment    rate in %) based on four different sectors    • Primary    • Secondary    • Tert...
 Agriculture,            mining, fishing & forestry Low-income countries
 Manufacturing   & construction
 Education , tourism High income countries (most developed)
 IT,Research  and  Development Financial  planning Consultation
 Good     only for westernised countries (MEDC countries)
 There  are many less developed countries  where the sector model can’t be applied  where the sector would be a service s...
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Clark%27s  _Sector_Model.png http://www.bized.co.uk/virtual/dc/copper/th  eory/th6.ht...
Clark sector model
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Clark sector model

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  • have three stages of production
  • Primary production is concerned with the extraction of raw materials through agriculture, mining, fishing, and forestry. Low-income countries are assumed to be predominantly dominated by primary production.
  • Secondary production concerned with industrial production through manufacturing and construction. Middle income countries are often dominated by their secondary sector.
  • Tertiary production concerned with the provision of services such as education and tourism. In high-income countries the tertiary sector dominates. Indeed having a large tertiary sector is seen as a sign of economic maturity in the development process.
  • The strengths of using this model is that it works for developed countries, more better than the undeveloped. This is because if a country is developed we could measure easily based on their economic growth in the four sectors.
  • However, this may be misleading. Some LDCs may have a large tertiary sector due to a large tourist industry without having developed a secondary industry. Economists argue that this could be somewhat risky. If the economic base is dominated by an economic activity such as tourism that has a high income elasticity of demand then a recession in the consuming nations will have a disproportionately large impact on the export earnings. A fall income will bring about a proportionately greater reduction in demand for the service and this will have severe impact on the economy. If it does not have a primary or secondary production to fall back on then borrowing and debt might be the only prospect.
  • Based on our information, we think that this model is only useful based on
  • Clark sector model

    1. 1. Ena & Sarah
    2. 2.  Shows economic growth (employment rate in %) based on four different sectors • Primary • Secondary • Tertiary • Quaternary
    3. 3.  Agriculture, mining, fishing & forestry Low-income countries
    4. 4.  Manufacturing & construction
    5. 5.  Education , tourism High income countries (most developed)
    6. 6.  IT,Research and Development Financial planning Consultation
    7. 7.  Good only for westernised countries (MEDC countries)
    8. 8.  There are many less developed countries where the sector model can’t be applied where the sector would be a service sector without having a well developed secondary sector (Kenya tourism) The model doesn’t take account to the international economic context & not showing the import of manufactured
    9. 9.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Clark%27s _Sector_Model.png http://www.bized.co.uk/virtual/dc/copper/th eory/th6.htm http://www.slideshare.net/fozzie/clark- fisher-model

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