Expatriate health insurance and other advice for Expats moving to Asia

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Health risks, medical facilities and expatriate health insurance covers vary in different parts of the world. Moving to another country involves such critical issues and some awareness in these matters is an added advantage.
In Asia for instance the biggest risk is not malaria, hepatitis or bird flu, but in fact road accidents. If you are moving to Asia in future then here is some health advice.
• Health risks: Awareness about the health risks that you could encounter in the region is the first step to ensuring your own wellbeing.
If you are wondering what the biggest health concerns for travelers and expats in Asia are then here is what health experts have to say: stress related problems, jet lag and respiratory diseases are primary concerns for business travelers while respiratory infections, traveller’s tummy (diarrhea), endemic infections like dengue, malaria, bird flu, Hepatitis A and B and swine flu are other health risks. The overall health risks tend to be higher in rural Southeast Asia.
• Medical kit: Preparation is the key to tackling health risks and your own medical kit is an absolute lifesaver.
Include common treatment for fever, cold, chest infection, diarrhea, pain and wounds. Those with a medical history must include prescription drugs together with an authorization letter for any tablets that have to be carried. Besides this what you need to include in the kit depends on your medical status and where you are going. Women may need to add some additional medication for problems like thrush and contraceptive pills to regulate their period.
• Immunizations: Start your vaccinations early, preferably eight weeks before you travel.
Most doctors recommend vaccinations against Hepatitis A and B. A Meningitis ACWY vaccine is advisable if you are going to be in close contact with locals in areas where Meningitis is a common problem. Tuberculosis, rabies and diphtheria are other diseases for which you may need immunization, depending on which part of Asia you are moving to. Anti-polio vaccination for children below 18 is highly recommended.
• Insurance cover: Some research on what your international expat health insurance covers and excludes is imperative so that you know exactly what to expect if there is a problem.

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Expatriate health insurance and other advice for Expats moving to Asia

  1. 1. Top Health Advice for Expats Moving to Asia<br />
  2. 2. Health risks, medical facilities and insurance covers vary in different parts of the world. Moving to another country involves such critical issues and some awareness in these matters is an added advantage. <br />In Asia for instance the biggest risk is not malaria, hepatitis or bird flu, but in fact road accidents.  If you are moving to Asia in future then here is some health advice.<br />2<br />
  3. 3. • Health risks: Awareness about the health risks that you could encounter in the region is the first step to ensuring your own well being. <br />3<br />
  4. 4. If you are wondering what the biggest health concerns for travelers and expats in Asia are then here is what health experts have to say…stress related problems, jet lag and respiratory diseases are primary concerns for business travelers while respiratory infections, traveller’s tummy (diarrhea), endemic infections like dengue, malaria, bird flu, Hepatitis A and B and swine flu are other health risks.  The overall health risks tend to be higher in rural Southeast Asia.<br />4<br />
  5. 5. Medical kit: Preparation is the key to tackling health risks and your own medical kit is an absolute life saver.  <br />Include common treatment for fever, cold, chest infection, diarrhea, pain and wounds.  Those with a medical history must include prescription drugs together with an authorization letter for any tablets that have to be carried.  Besides this what you need to include in the kit depends on your medical status and where you are going.<br />5<br />
  6. 6. Women may need to add some additional medication for problems like thrush and contraceptive pills to regulate their period.<br />Immunizations: Start your vaccinations early…preferably eight weeks before you travel. <br />6<br />
  7. 7. Most doctors recommend vaccinations against Hepatitis A and B.  A Meningitis ACWY vaccine is advisable if you are going to be in close contact with locals in areas where Meningitis is a common problem. Tuberculosis, rabies and diphtheria are other diseases for which you may need immunization, depending on which part of Asia you are moving to.  Anti-polio vaccination for children below 18 is highly recommended.<br />7<br />
  8. 8. Coping with Weather Conditions: Heat, dust and humidity are common weather conditions which could lead to health concerns. <br />Wear loose, full length cotton clothing, a broad rimmed hat and apply sun block to protect your skin from the harmful effects of the sun.  Drink at least eight glasses of water a day to stay hydrated.  Wear a nose mask to protect yourself from dust. <br />8<br />
  9. 9. Road accidents: If you thought the biggest health risks in Asia are dengue, malaria and bird flu then here are some statistics which could be startling.  <br />The Asia-Pacific region has only 16 per cent of the world’s vehicles but accounts for 60 per cent of the world’s accidental deaths.  Use common sense and restraint while walking, crossing streets and navigating traffic are some ways to prevent road accidents.  Given the scenario, the importance of accident insurance cannot be overemphasized. <br />9<br />
  10. 10. Avoid insects: Mosquitoes and bugs are responsible for the spread of most infectious diseases which plague the region.  Sleeping under a mosquito net, use of mosquito repellent and regular pest control is some important preventive measures which if taken could ensure you have adequate protection from the mosquito menace.<br />10<br />
  11. 11. Food and water:  Drink bottled or boiled water at all times to prevent water borne diseases.  Clean hands and clean utensils with hot, freshly cooked food at the table is what you will need to stay healthy.  Wash and peel fruits and vegetables yourself. <br />Asia has an array of street food and you may be tempted to succumb to its many tastes and aromas.  Steer clear of this temptation for it is often the surest way of attracting tummy trouble.  Avoid undercooked poultry and local delicacies like sushi to keep parasitic infections at bay.<br />11<br />
  12. 12. Use a hand sanitizer to keep your hands clean or simply wash frequently with soap and water, especially before eating and cooking.<br />Insurance cover: Some research on what your health insurance covers and excludes is imperative so that you know exactly what to expect if there is a problem.  <br />12<br />
  13. 13. Start now!<br />Compare the major providers BUPA healthcare, Clements International and more or request a free quote from an independent broker to help you compare the market and find the most cost effective solution. <br />Visit www.expatfinder.com now!<br />13<br />

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