Literary Terms Review             Wohoo!(Yes, that’s an onomatopoeia.)
Imagery            • Use of words to create a sensory  experience or image• Uses the 5 senses• Helps you imagine the place...
Imagery#1 Write a sentence that isFILLED with imagery•              Your examples:•   A sunset (sight)•   A bowl of ice (t...
Simile• Figure of speech that makes a  comparison between two seemingly  unlike things by using a connective  word—like, a...
5
• The desks overhead sounded  like the thunderous dancing  of elephants.• My eyes pooled like rivers        Simile  during...
Metaphor• Figure of speech that  makes a comparison  between two unlike things  without using a connective  word such as l...
Metaphor• “All the worlds a stage,  And all the men and  women merely players  in it.” -William  Shakespeare• America is a...
#3 Write a metaphor• Your example: fill in the  blank with an object• Friendship is . . .• Music is . . .• She is...• Or us...
Personification• Gives human qualities to  an animal, thing, or  concept• The tree sighed sadly in  the cold wind.• The war...
Personification• “The ruddy brick floor smiled up  at the smoky ceiling; the oaken  settles, shiny with long wear,  exchange...
Hyperbole• Figure of speech that uses  exaggeration to express  strong emotion or create a  comic effect• Ex: The limousin...
Hyperbole•   “At last the garbage reached so high   That finally it touched the sky.   And all the neighbors moved away,   ...
Symbolism• Represents something else  and itself• Always actually occurs in  the text, usually more than  once, instead of...
Symbolism• “All this last day Frodo had not  spoken, but had walked half-  bowed, often stumbling, as if his  eyes no long...
Irony--3 kinds• A deliberate contrast between  two levels of meaning• Verbal—implying a different  meaning than what is di...
Irony—which kind?•   Donkey: Can I stay with you? Please?•   Shrek: Of course.•   Donkey: Really?•   Shrek: NO.• A couple ...
Irony—your turn!• #7 Verbal Irony--a teenager is  being yelled at for being out  past curfew. What does he/she  say in rep...
Allusion• Reference to a statement,  person, place, event, or thing  that is known from literature,  history, religion, my...
Allusion• Ex: The students were sure  that their teacher had  drunk from the river Styx  because of her complete  inattent...
Paradox• A statement that appears to be  contradictory, but actually  expresses a truth• Ex: “Less is more”• “Truth must d...
Paradox• “Though this be madness,  yet there is method in’t”  -Polonius in Hamlet• Humans are the best  examples of parado...
Oxymoron• Figure of speech which seems  to be self contradictory, but is  actually true; a compressed  paradox• Ex: Romeo ...
Allegory• A constant set of symbols operating on two  levels in a story• Ex: Plato’s Allegory of the Cave--People are  cha...
• Ex: “Young Goodman Brown”  ignores warning of his wife  Faith, travels into the forest and  meets a man with a snake sta...
Satire• Genre of comedy ridiculing human  faults such as vanity, hypocrisy,  stupidity, and greed--the aim is to  evoke la...
Point of View•    The identity of the narrative voice; the     person or entity through whom the reader     experiences th...
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Literary terms

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  • Literary terms

    1. 1. Literary Terms Review Wohoo!(Yes, that’s an onomatopoeia.)
    2. 2. Imagery • Use of words to create a sensory experience or image• Uses the 5 senses• Helps you imagine the place, smell the food, get angry, etc.• Ex: The family dinner was a “combination of boisterous conversation, badly burnt chicken, and the scent of freshly baked bread.”
    3. 3. Imagery#1 Write a sentence that isFILLED with imagery• Your examples:• A sunset (sight)• A bowl of ice (touch)• A song you love (sound)• Or choose something on your own
    4. 4. Simile• Figure of speech that makes a comparison between two seemingly unlike things by using a connective word—like, as, than, or resembles• “My love is like a red, red rose.” - Robert Burns• “And the sudden flurries of snow- birds, Like brown leaves whirling by.” –James Russell Lowell• His skin was as cold as ice.• http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=sWDSxmMo9Z0
    5. 5. 5
    6. 6. • The desks overhead sounded like the thunderous dancing of elephants.• My eyes pooled like rivers Simile during the wedding vows.• #2 Write a simile• Your examples:• Anger tastes like . . .• Kindness smells like . . .• Or anything you would like...
    7. 7. Metaphor• Figure of speech that makes a comparison between two unlike things without using a connective word such as like or as. Metaphors can be direct, implied, extended, or mixed• Ex: “I am soft sift/ In an hourglass.” –Gerard Manley Hopkins
    8. 8. Metaphor• “All the worlds a stage, And all the men and women merely players in it.” -William Shakespeare• America is a melting pot.• How could she date a snake like that?
    9. 9. #3 Write a metaphor• Your example: fill in the blank with an object• Friendship is . . .• Music is . . .• She is...• Or use anything to make a comparison 9
    10. 10. Personification• Gives human qualities to an animal, thing, or concept• The tree sighed sadly in the cold wind.• The warm sun wrapped me in a blanket of peace.
    11. 11. Personification• “The ruddy brick floor smiled up at the smoky ceiling; the oaken settles, shiny with long wear, exchanged cheerful glances with each other; plates on the dresser grinned at pots on the shelf . . .” --The Wind in the Willows• #4 Your example:• Describe a place in the style above--giving a feeling to the place by adding personification.
    12. 12. Hyperbole• Figure of speech that uses exaggeration to express strong emotion or create a comic effect• Ex: The limousine was as long as the Titanic.• Julie wears so much make-up she has to use a sandblaster to get it off at night.
    13. 13. Hyperbole• “At last the garbage reached so high That finally it touched the sky. And all the neighbors moved away, And none of her friends would come out to play. And finally Sarah Cynthia Stout said, “OK, I’ll take the garbage out!” But then, of course, it was too late. . . --Shel Silverstein#5 Your example:I laughed until . . .I was hungry enough . . .
    14. 14. Symbolism• Represents something else and itself• Always actually occurs in the text, usually more than once, instead of as a comparison• Common symbols: – Rose – Flag – Rain
    15. 15. Symbolism• “All this last day Frodo had not spoken, but had walked half- bowed, often stumbling, as if his eyes no longer saw the way before his feet. Sam guessed that among all their pains he bore the worst, the growing weight of the Ring, a burden on the body and a torment to his mind.” -J.R.R. Tolkien• # 6 Your example: Come up with your own symbol that represents two different meanings.
    16. 16. Irony--3 kinds• A deliberate contrast between two levels of meaning• Verbal—implying a different meaning than what is directly stated – Different than sarcasm, which is much more direct and harsh• Situational--the opposite of what is expected happens• Dramatic—audience knows something that one or more of the characters does not
    17. 17. Irony—which kind?• Donkey: Can I stay with you? Please?• Shrek: Of course.• Donkey: Really?• Shrek: NO.• A couple appears in court to finalize a divorce, but during the proceeding, they remarry instead.• Juliet is actually not dead, but asleep with the help of a strong potion. Romeo sees her lying in the tomb and kills himself because he believes her to be dead.
    18. 18. Irony—your turn!• #7 Verbal Irony--a teenager is being yelled at for being out past curfew. What does he/she say in reply?• #8 Situational Irony--You meet the man/woman of your dreams and expect to make a good impression. Instead, . . .• #9 Dramatic Irony--Think of a recent movie in which the audience knows something the characters do not.
    19. 19. Allusion• Reference to a statement, person, place, event, or thing that is known from literature, history, religion, myth, politics, sports, science, or the arts• Examples: "Christy didnt like to spend money. She was no Scrooge, but she seldom purchased anything except the bare necessities".
    20. 20. Allusion• Ex: The students were sure that their teacher had drunk from the river Styx because of her complete inattention to their pranks.• #10 Your example—think of a recent example you’ve heard or seen in which someone references a well-known work
    21. 21. Paradox• A statement that appears to be contradictory, but actually expresses a truth• Ex: “Less is more”• “Truth must dazzle gradually/ Or every man be blind” -Emily Dickinson• “Success is counted sweetest/ By those who ne’er succeed” - Emily Dickinson• “It is in giving that we receive” -Francis of Assisi
    22. 22. Paradox• “Though this be madness, yet there is method in’t” -Polonius in Hamlet• Humans are the best examples of paradoxes.• Mrs. Bell is rarely on time and yet chose a career that is governed by time and a bell schedule.
    23. 23. Oxymoron• Figure of speech which seems to be self contradictory, but is actually true; a compressed paradox• Ex: Romeo describes love using several oxymorons, such as “cold fire,” “feather of lead” and “sick health”• Ex: She had a terrible beauty. There was a deafening silence.
    24. 24. Allegory• A constant set of symbols operating on two levels in a story• Ex: Plato’s Allegory of the Cave--People are chained in a cave and think that the shadows they see are truth. When people break free, they leave the cave and see things as they truly are.• George Orwells Animal Farm is a historical allegory of the Cold War/Bolshevik Revolution in Soviet Union. The book is actually about animals rebelling against the farmers, but then the pig leader abuses his power and manipulates the rest of the animals, just like how Joseph Stalin ruled the Soviet Union in real life.
    25. 25. • Ex: “Young Goodman Brown” ignores warning of his wife Faith, travels into the forest and meets a man with a snake staff and witches. He loses his faith.• In the story the husband is questioning his religion and his relationship with his wife is faltering, it is allegorical because his wifes name is symbolic of both his loss in religious belief and loss in "Faith" aka his wife. 25
    26. 26. Satire• Genre of comedy ridiculing human faults such as vanity, hypocrisy, stupidity, and greed--the aim is to evoke laughter, to expose and criticize• Ex: Anything on Saturday Night Live or The Daily Show• Austin Powers--ridicules the spy movies and heroes• Swift’s “A Modest Proposal” in which he proposes a solution to the problem of over-population in Ireland--the children of the poor should be a food source for the rich
    27. 27. Point of View• The identity of the narrative voice; the person or entity through whom the reader experiences the story.• First-person is narrated by a character in the story or a direct observer).• Second person style which addresses the reader as you, hoping to make you identify with the character• Third-person Omniscient knows all about all the characters and is only limited by what she may want to tell you.• Third-person Limited describes a narrator who knows everything but only follows the point of view of one particular character.

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