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Evans building literacy skills

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Evans building literacy skills

  1. 1. Jennifer Evans Assistant Director ELA St. Clair County RESA Evans.jennifer@sccresa.org http://www.protopage.com/evans.jennifer#Untitled/Home
  2. 2. To gain background knowledge for strategies used in reading To provide strategies you can use with students that will support their classroom instruction To understand the fundamental concepts that are important for students to master
  3. 3. Likely Key Shifts in ELA Assessments Most Current Assessments Next Generation Assessments Measures ELA only Measures ELA, historical, scientific and technical literacy (informational text) Write to decontextualized prompts Respond in writing to authentic texts Write narratives Write arguments Assess one part of a standard Assess complex, integrated performances (e.g., research, multi-media) Paper-and-pencil Computerized assessments One yearly assessment Several Assessments in a year Measures academic vocabulary Adapted from the work Susan Pimental Measures text complexity 3
  4. 4. One Word: Rigor College and Career Readiness Requires RIGOR 4
  5. 5. Rigor: Reading Inference Evidence Analyze Summarize Interpret Integrate Evaluate Delineate 5
  6. 6. Grade 4 8 12 To Persuade 30% 35% 40% To Explain To Convey Experience 35% 35% 35% 30% 40% 20% Distribution of Writing in the 2011 NAEP Writing Framework, Common Core State Standards for ENGLISH LANGUAGE ART S & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects, pg. 5
  7. 7.  Chip’s In Activity:
  8. 8.      What is reading comprehension? Why is comprehension important? What instructions help students develop comprehension? How can we adopt instruction for students with special needs? How can we monitor students’ progress in comprehension?
  9. 9. Comprehension Vocabulary Fluency
  10. 10.  The NRP (2000) identified the following comprehension strategies as most promising and effective for helping students improve their comprehension: Comprehension Monitoring Cooperative Learning Graphic and Semantic Organizers Story (or Text) Structure and Mapping Questioning (Answering & Generating) Summarization Multiple Strategy Approach
  11. 11. 1. Gradual Release Model (To-With-By): https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/improving -teacher-practice 2. Explicit Instruction 3. Engage in Discussion 4. Implement Suggested Strategies
  12. 12. Comprehensi on Strategies Model! Use prompts. Use Graphic Organizers. Use questioning and discussion to monitor student comprehension.  Let me show you! (To)  Let’s do it together! (With)  You show Monitoring Comprehension: (By) me! http://www.thinkport.org/microsites/readi ng/video/monitor.mpg
  13. 13. Guided Highlighted Reading: http://www.readingtothecore.com/ghr.html 15
  14. 14. Vocabulary  In line #1, find and highlight the word that means intentionally.  In line #5, find and highlight the word that means essence.  In line #7, find and highlight the word that means of little value.   In line #8, find and highlight the word that means magnificent. In line #10, find and highlight the phrase that means quickly decided without thought. (hastily concluded) Summary  In lines #1 and #2, find and highlight what Thoreau wants to find and what he wants to learn. 16
  15. 15. Frog and Locust In line #1, find and highlight the length of time without rain In line # 6, find and highlight what was left at the bottom of the canyon In line #7, find and highlight what happened to the puddles In line #13, find and highlight what would happened to the frog’s puddle and the frog if it didn’t rain soon In line #15, find and highlight what the frog did to bring rain In line #20, find and highlight what lived on the top of the mountain
  16. 16. Select a book Create your own questioning plan for Guided Highlighted Reading with the book Share with a partner
  17. 17.    Think Pair Share Visualizing during read aloud ◦ How did you picture the part where it said, “The students were squished on the bus.”? Who did you picture on slide? How is that person coming down the slide? Students connect discussion comments to those made by another reader: ◦ I agree with _______ because _________________. ◦ I disagree with ________ because _______________. ◦ In addition to what ________ said, I’d like to add __________________.  When talking with a partner, help them share more: ◦ Tell me more of your thinking about ________. ◦ Let’s talk a little more about ______________. ◦ Another way to think about it might be ____________.
  18. 18. Bloom’s   Groups predict what they story will be about using picture clues or story title. Groups generate questions ◦ Who will the story focus on? ◦ Where will it take place? ◦ What problems might occur?   Groups summarize the main parts of the story Groups determine if there predictions were correct and clarify answers to the questions they generated. Reciprocal Teaching: http://www.doe.virginia.gov/instruction/english/elementary/readi ng/reading_vocabulary_strategies.shtml
  19. 19.  Asking Questions: Gives a purpose for reading Focuses attention on what must be learned Helps develop active thinking while reading Helps monitor comprehension Helps review content Relates what is learned to what is already known (connections!) ◦ Requires students to make inferences ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦  (Armbruster, Lear, & Osborn, 2001)
  20. 20. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v= U0o2jUFRpXc&desktop_uri=%2Fwat ch%3Fv%3DU0o2jUFRpXc&app=des ktop     Right There: You can put your finger on it. (What was the score at the end of the game?) Think and Search: You can put your finger on 2 or more answers from 2 or more paragraphs. (What are some of the things T.J. did?) Author and you: Information from the story and you. You must think about what you already know, what the author is telling you, and how both fit together. (What are some other ways Jake could have solved the problem?). On your own: Information just from you. (Have you ever been the new student and what did it feel like?)
  21. 21. Select a book Create your own questioning plan for QAR and/or Bloom’s Reading with the book Share with a partner
  22. 22. ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ T-chart Story Prediction K-W-L Question the Author Story Sequence Vocabulary Frame Word Rating Story Comparison Story Elements Main Idea Venn Diagram Cause and Effect Time Line & Steps in a Process Link to Graphic Organizers: https://www.google.com/search?q=graphic+organizers&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&e i=O6M8UuOxBYnN2wXxsIHIBQ&ved=0CEEQsAQ&biw=1440&bih=785&dpr=1
  23. 23. Words to describe topic Details Words to describe topic Details Words to describe topic details Words to describe topic Details Main Idea
  24. 24. Running Records Fluency Repeated Readings
  25. 25.     Appropriate fluency is dependent on the reading purpose. Students loose meaning if reading is very slow or filled with miscues When reading non-fiction text for meaning fluency rate (wpm) should be slower. Rereading material several times allows students to gain additional information. Why Fluency? Video: http://www.readnaturally.com/howto/videos_rn.htm Reading Rockets Fluency: http://www.readingrockets.org/teaching/reading101/fluency/
  26. 26.   Folding Directions: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EP5SonqP 9Hk&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DEP5Sonq P9Hk&app=desktop Example use of a foldable: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQHcau2 5nZ0
  27. 27. Select a book Create your own plan for content to place in a foldable Share with a partner
  28. 28. 1. 2. 3. 4. Choral responses Partner responses Written responses A. Focused prompts increase thinking, accountability, focus B. Structured academic language Individual responses “We can’t narrow the gap unless we dramatically increase student response to instruction.” Dr. Kevin Feldman – Director of Reading and Early Intervention with Sonoma County Office of Education, CA – February, 2009
  29. 29. Previewing Text Be specific! Structure Use the correct names. Model how to use each part. Titles Sub-titles Table of Contents Graphics Captions Glossary Index  Let me show you!  Let’s do it together!  You show me! Text Talk Time: https://www.teachingchannel.org/vide os/analyzing-text-as-a-group
  30. 30.   Ask the student how the text looks the same as or different than other material before reading. Point out the features of the text and how they are important. ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ Titles Sub-titles Illustrations, photographs, and captions Bold or italicized words/phrases Timelines, maps, or other graphics
  31. 31. Word Identification and Context Model! Clues  Let me show you! Use prompts. Don’t give the words because the object is to teach students how to do it on their own.  Let’s do it together!  You show me!
  32. 32.  Model and teach strategies to help students identify unknown words. ◦ “Fix-up” or “Repair” Strategies ◦ Cues on bookmarks, charts, etc. ◦ Using context clues and text structure ◦ Use the glossary Modeling Fix-Up Strategies: http://teachershare.scholastic.com/resources/11559
  33. 33.  Model and teach students how to use clues in the text to derive meaning of unfamiliar or difficult words. ◦ analyze word parts (prefix, suffix, roots, inflectional/derivational endings) ◦ use word id. skills to figure out multisyllabic words ◦ use graphics, pictures, and other parts of text to derive meaning for difficult words and phrases Context Clues Song Video: :http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IaDfmjs2sWI&feature=fvwrel&app=d esktop Using Comic Books to teach Context Clues: http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=91484
  34. 34.         Previewing Vocabulary Questioning Picking out details Paraphrasing Paragraph Summaries Rereading Marginalia Note taking         Graphic Organizers Picture Prompts Fix-up or Repair charts Bookmarks Self-monitoring charts Vocabulary sorts Sticky Notes Highlighters
  35. 35.  This will improve: Comprehension Vocabulary Language Acquisition
  36. 36. Professional 45 Million Words (In Millions) Estimated Cumulative Words Addressed to Child Language Experiences by Group Workingclass 26 Million Words Welfare 13 Million Words 12 48 24 36 (Age Child in Months) Meaningful Differences in the Everyday Experience of Young American Children by Betty Hart & Todd R. Risley. Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co. (1995).
  37. 37.   Only 4% of the school day is spent engaging in student talk. Only 2% of is spent discussing focal lesson content (but not necessarily using relevant academic language). ◦ Arreaga-Mayer & Perdomo-Rivera, 1996
  38. 38. Previewi ng Make it fun! The Vocabul extra time spent ary on developing vocabulary will be well invested in comprehension. Word sorts Vocabulary Webs Guess My Word Picture matches Tier II word emphasis  Let me show you!  Let’s do it together!  You show me!
  39. 39. Grade 2 Vocabulary Video  https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/imp roving-student-vocabulary?fd=1   Dr. Anita Archer Podcasts http://www.scoe.org/pub/htdocs/archervideos.html
  40. 40. Pronounce the word – terrible -- kids repeat the word with you several times Explain the meaning: Terrible means something unpleasant or very bad. For example, a bad storm that destroys many trees and homes is terrible. A rotten fish smells terrible. When we have a lot of snow and cold weather during the winter, some people say that the winter was terrible. Students fill in the statement using the term: When something smells bad, we might say that it smells ____ (terrible). When we watch a very bad movie, we might say that the movie was ______ (terrible). When our parents make us eat broccoli, some of us might say that it tastes _______ (terrible). When a storm is very strong and destroys trees and homes, we say that the storm was ______ (terrible). Students act out the term: Make a face that shows me what you would look like if we smelled something terrible, like rotten food. Kids make a face. Show me how you would look if you hurt your arm and it felt terrible. Engage students in a read aloud where students identify the vocabulary words as they are read. Ask a question using the word and have students share their responses: What is an example of something that is terrible? Turn and tell a partner or share out loud. Be sure to include pictures, video, text, a graphic organizer, sharing, and an exit ticket.
  41. 41. 1. Choose word (tier II) 2. Explain Meaning 3. Repeat word several times Use illustrations or videos to visualize the word
  42. 42.  Students fill in the statement using the term: When something smells bad, we might say that it smells ____ (terrible). When we watch a very bad movie, we might say that the movie was ______ (terrible). When our parents make us eat broccoli, some of us might say that it tastes _______ (terrible). When a storm is very strong and destroys trees and homes, we say that the storm was ______ (terrible).
  43. 43. Students act out the term: Make a face that shows me what you would look like if we smelled something terrible, like rotten food. Kids make a face. Show me how you would look if you hurt your arm and it felt terrible.
  44. 44.  Engage students in a read aloud where students identify the vocabulary words as they are read.
  45. 45. terrible Select one term for the concept wheel – terrible Brainstorm what kids know about the word and its meaning. Write the word in the first quadrant. Think of three more key ideas about the word to add to the graphic organizer
  46. 46. Vocabulary Word Brief Definition Picture of Word Antonym/Nonexample Create your personal sentence
  47. 47. Vocabulary Word Picture of Word silent Brief Definition Being very quiet Antonym/Nonexample noisy Create your personal sentence The classroom was silent on the weekend.
  48. 48.    Create Anchor Charts or Posters Have students present examples and non-examples for the vocabulary word Ask deep processing questions ◦ Answer questions  “Would you prefer to have a festive day or an ordinary day?” ◦ Create Examples  What is something that a good citizen might do? ◦ Make Choices  If any of the things I name can hatch, say hatch; if not, say nothing: a train, a chicken, a jar of jam, a snake, a tadpole, a horse. ◦ Pantomime  Show me how an eagle soars, a rocket, an airplane. ◦ Personal Context  Some people are fond of fishing. Tell about something you are fond of. Use the word fond when you tell about it. ◦ Synonyms and Antonyms  Name a word that means the opposite of genuine; name a word that means about the same as genuine.
  49. 49.  Least - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Most  How happy would you be if . . . ◦ your mother urged you to have a second piece of candy? ◦ least happy - - - - - - - - - - - most happy ◦ everyone in your class looked glum? ◦ least happy - - - - - - - - - - - most happy ◦ there was a downpour on your class picnic? ◦ Least happy - - - - - - - - - - - most happy
  50. 50.  Least - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Most  How much strength does it take to . . . ◦ pull a sprout out of the ground? ◦ least strength - - - - - - - - - most strength ◦ lift an enormous refrigerator? ◦ least strength - - - - - - - - - most strength ◦ kick a football a significant distance? ◦ least strength - - - - - - - - - most strength 
  51. 51.  How precious would something be . . .  How reluctant would you be . . .  if _____  if _____  if _____  if _____  if _____  if _____
  52. 52.  Based on what I read, I would connect _______ and _______ because ________________________ ____________________________________________.  Example from Brave Irene:   Based on what I read, I would connect reluctant and insisted because although her mother insisted she leave the closing laundromat, Lisa was very reluctant to listen until she found Corduroy.
  53. 53.   2.2 “Bad Dog, Dodger!” Based on what I read, I would connect practice and treat because when Sam took time to practice good behavior with Dodger and reward Dodger with a treat, Dodger finally started behaving better.
  54. 54. . Select a book 1 2. Identify one academic vocabulary word from the book 3. Create your plan to include: a picture definition fill-inthe-blank repeating action read aloud concept map exit ticket
  55. 55.  Review: Strategies we have covered to improve reading comprehension and vocabulary: 1. Comprehension Monitoring 2. Cooperative Learning 3. Graphic and Semantic Organizers 4. Story (or Text) Structure and Mapping 5. Questioning (Answering & Generating) 6. Summarization 7. Multiple Strategy Approach
  56. 56. 1. Comprehension monitoring: Guided Highlighted Reading – Rereading Written Responses Individual Responses Fluency/Accuracy (Running Records, etc.) Self-monitoring charts Picking out details Discussions Vocabulary
  57. 57. 2. Cooperative Learning: Think Pair Share Visualizing during read aloud Connect Discussion comments made by another reader Help partners share more Partner Responses Vocabulary Activities
  58. 58. 3. Graphic and Semantic Organizers: T-chart Story Prediction K-W-L Question the Author Story Sequence Vocabulary Frame Word Rating Story Comparison Story Elements Main Idea Think Links Venn Diagram Cause and Effect Time Line Vocabulary sorts
  59. 59. 4. Story (text) structure and mapping:    * Foldables * Vocabulary * Text Structure activities Titles  Sub-titles Table of Contents  Graphics  Captions  Glossary  Index  
  60. 60. 5. Questioning: Predict Clarify Focus QAR Picture Prompts Blooms Discussions Vocabulary
  61. 61. 6. Summarization: Questioning Discussions Marginalia Sticky Notes Note-taking Bookmarks Paragraph summaries Vocabulary Paraphrasing
  62. 62. 7. Multiple Strategy Approach: Choral responses Word Identification Context Clues Fix-up or Repair charts Vocabulary Discussions
  63. 63. 1. Introduce the word – repeat 2. Explain the meaning (illustrate) 3. Fill in the blank 6. Identify in text 5. Share an example 4. Act it out 7. Graphic Organizer 8. Exit Ticket Assessment
  64. 64. Something new that I learned today is…

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