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Final exam review blackboard (1)

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Final exam review blackboard (1)

  1. 1. KINE 2250 ‘COACHING TRACK AND FIELD FINAL EXAM REVIEWWEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7TH FINAL EXAM REVIEW IN CLASSROOM COACHING FOLDERS RETURNED CHECK BLACKBOARD FOR GRADESWEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14TH FINAL EXAM 8:00 – 10:00 AM
  2. 2. CHAPER # 9TEXTBOOKRELAYS:4 X 100 METERS – sprint relay, 4 x 1, 400 Meter Relay one lap around the track, each runner runs100meters acceleration zones BLIND EXCHANGE, ALTERNATING HANDS, RT,LFT,RT,LFT4 X 200 METERS - 800 Meter Relay, 4 x 2 two laps around the track, each runner runs 200 meters acceleration zones BLIND, SEMI-BLIND4 X 400 METERS – Mile Relay, 4 x 4, 1600 Meter Relay four laps around the track, each runner runs 400 meters no acceleration zone Break Line on second leg NO BLIND EXCHANGE, ALL RUNNERS RECEIVE BATON IN LEFT HAND AND THEN SWITCH THE BATON TO THE RIGHT HAND
  3. 3. RELAY RACES •Fun & exciting •Used for motivation •Excellent tool for workoutsVOCABULARY BATON EXCHANGE ZONE ACCELERATION ZONE INCOMING RUNNER OUTGOING RUNNER BREAK LINE LEG UPSWEEP DOWNSWEEP PUSH PRESS BLIND EXCHANGE SEMI-BLIND LEAD LEG ANCHOR LEG SECOND / THIRD LEGS
  4. 4. RELAYS10 METERS // 11 YARDS EXCHANGE ZONE 20 METERS // 22 YARDSACCELERATION ZONEOUTGOING RUNNER MAY STAND IN BATON MUST BE PASSED IN THIS ZONETHIS AREA AND COMMENCERUNNING
  5. 5. NFHS RULESRelays are races between teams of four competitors, each running only one distance(leg). An individual leg of the race is finished when the incoming competitor passesthe baton to the succeeding or outgoing competitor.Entries - no more than six individuals may be listed on the entry sheet, but onlythose who actually run will be considered official participants. Substitutions maycome from only those names on the entry sheet.The order of running may be changed between heats and succeeding rounds or thefinals.In relays which are run the entire distance in lanes, teammates of each startingcompetitor shall occupy the same lane or corresponding position at each exchangemark, and the baton may be exchanged only in such lane or position.The baton must be passed while the baton is within a 20 meter (22 yard) exchangezone. A baton that inadvertently leaves a runner’s hand must be retrievedimmediately without interference to other runners.
  6. 6. NFHS RULESThe baton shall be handed, not thrown from the competitor to the succeeding teammate.This teammate shall not take sole possession of the baton while the baton is outside theexchange zone. If the baton is dropped in the exchange zone, in a legitimate attempt tohand it, either competitor may retrieve it, even from another lane, provided thecompetitor does not interfere with an opponent and the baton is retrieved within thelimits of the original exchange zone extended across the track. If the baton is droppedoutside the exchange zone, it must be retrieved by the competitor who dropped it.After passing the baton, the relieved competitor should stand still or jog straight aheadand step off the track when clear.Acceleration zones - races where individual legs run 200 meters or less 400 x 1 (sprint relay) and 4 x 2 (800 meter relay) 10 meters (11 yards) outside exchange zone Outgoing runner may stand on the acceleration mark and commence running from this position. The baton MUST be passed however in the exchange zone.In relay races where acceleration zones are not permitted, each outgoing runner whilewaiting for the baton, shall take a position entirely within the passing zone and mustcomplete the exchange while the baton is within the 20 – meter (22 yard) exchange zone.
  7. 7. ACTIVITY #9 DIRECTIONS: Answer the following questions. You may discuss with others 1. Which relay uses the blind exchange? 400 M (4 X 1) 2. Runners do not have to stay in their assigned lane while running this relay. (last two runners) 1600 M RELAY / 4 X 4 1. Another name for the 4 x 2 relay is…. 800 METER RELAY 2. The sprint relay is also called the …….400 METER RELAY OR 4 X 1 RELAY 3. The maximum number of entrants for a relay is six. TRUE OR FALSE 4. Once a coach has determined the running order for a relay and turned in the entry sheet, he / she may make changes between heats, provided the runner’s name is listed on the sheet. TRUE OR FALSE 1 2 37. What is the space between triangles 1 and 2 called? EXCHANGE ZONE8. What is the identification term for triangle 3? ACCELERATON MARK9. This relay uses a ‘double stagger’ to begin the race. 800 METER RELAY OR 4 X 210. The term for the runner receiving the baton. OUTGOING RUNNER11. Can a team drop the baton and still finish the race without penalty? TRUE OR FALSE MAY NOT THROW THE BATON
  8. 8. LONG JUMP TWO DETERMINING FACTORS OF THE LONG JUMP SUCCESS: 1. APPROACH RUN 2. TAKE - OFF• There is a strong relation between a jumper’s execution of the approach run and take off and the performance of a jump.• The more consistent and technically correct the approach run and take-off, the better the jump performance will be.
  9. 9. 4 PHASES OF THE LONG JUMP1.APPROACH2.LAST TWO STRIDES3.TAKE OFF4.ACTION IN THE AIR & LANDING
  10. 10. THE FOUR PHASES OF THE LONG JUMP1. Approach• Objective is to develop a consistent approach run that will allow for gradual acceleration. It begins with the first stride and ending with maximum controlled speed at take-off• Length should be between 12-19 strides. It is harder for inexperienced jumpers to attain a long approach run. Thus, beginners should begin with the shorter approach and once the jumper gains experience they can move to more strides in the approach.• A successful approach run depends on the consistency of the first 2-3 strides. It is here that the rhythm of the run is developed.• If a jumpers take-off foot is the same foot used to push off with at the start, there will be an even number of strides. However, if a jumper’s take-off foot is not the same there will be an odd number of strides.
  11. 11. 2. Last two strides• The objective of the last two strides is to prepare or set up for the take-off while conserving as much speed as possible.• Prior to these last strides, the jumper is in a full sprinting position and continues acceleration by pushing down against the ground.• There are two strides to the second component: - Penultimate Stride: this is the next to last stride from the take-off. When this occurs, there is a lowering of the jumpers center of gravity and the flexion of the knee and ankle of the supporting leg. It is imperative that they prepare the body during the penultimate stride. - Last Stride: This is shorter than the penultimate stride because of the raising of the jumper’s center of gravity. When a concentric contraction is preceded by a phase of active stretching in the muscles of the take-off leg, elastic energy is stored and the take-off leg is “loaded up”• It is critical that jumpers stay relaxed and maintain approach speed through the last two strides. This can be accomplished by continuing to stroke their arms through the last two strides. This helps because stopping the movement of the arms will decrease approach speed into the take-off. VERBAL CUE: “DAY - TODAY”
  12. 12. 4. Action in the air and landing• The objective for the last component is to rotate the body into an efficient landing position that maximizes jump distance.• The jumper moves the arms and legs about the center of gravity to counteract forward rotation and assume an optimal position for landing. A technique that can help with this is the hitch-kick technique. By cycling the arms and leg through the air the jumper is able to maintain an upright body position and set p for a good landing. Another technique is called the hang and the sail. This has the same effect as the hitch-kick.• If a jumper does not counteract the forward rotation this will cause the jumper to continue rotating forward and land facedown in the sand.
  13. 13. PHASES OF THE TRIPLE JUMP1. APPROACH2. Hop3. Step4. Jump (TAKE OFF)5. ACTION IN AIR & LANDING
  14. 14. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AdnLY0a6yn0 MECHANICS OF THE TRIPLE JUMP 1. HOP Push off and land on same foot 2. Step Push off and step, land on opposite foot 3. Jump Take off board 4. Arm Action Single, Double, Combination http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jv54lCSVMI Example: RUNNER BEGINS SEQUENCE WITH LEFT FOOT (HOP) HOP LEFT, take off board, LEFT landing STEP LEFT, RIGHT LEFT / LEFT / RIGHT JUMP RIGHT TAKE OFF FOOT into pit Example: RUNNER BEGINS SEQUENCE WITH RIGHT FOOT (HOP) HOP RIGHT, take off board, RIGHT landing STEP RIGHT, LEFT RIGHT / RIGHT / LEFT JUMP LEFT TAKE OFF FOOT into pit
  15. 15. PHASES NOV. 1, 2010APPROACH Long enough to allow build up to full speed Jumper must maintain control 100 – 130 feet Beginner – 100 feet Increase length in approach with experience/skill of jumperHOP Take off should be forward and up (not up and forward) Jumper should “run off the board” Land on entire foot, not the toes or heel (heel injuries) Hitch Kick ARM ACTION Single – running motion - take off board Double – pulling back both arms prior to JUMP into pithttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mTJDfHlKV1M
  16. 16. STEP NOV. 1, 2010 OPPOSITE LEG FORWARD (opposite of hop leg) UPPER LEG PERPENDICULAR TO THE BODY – PARALLEL TO THE GROUND DOUBLE ARM ACTION – BOTH ARMS COME FORWARD SINGLE ARM ACTION – OPPOSITE ARM GOES FORWARD (as in running)JUMP – TAKE OFF – ACTION IN AIR & LANDING SINGLE ARM ACTION – ARMS ARE INTERCHANGED DOUBLE ARM ACTION – ARMS ARE PULLED THROUGH WITH A PUNCH (similar to long jump) HANG STYLE OF JUMP (not enough time for a hitch kick) JUMPER TRIES TO GET AS HIGH AS POSSIBLE WITH BOTH ARMS REACHING UP AND EXTENDING FORWARD HEELS LEAD THE WAY INTO THE PIThttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5hD-iPwxl0
  17. 17. KINE 2250 ‘COACHING TRACK & FIELD’ NOV. 7, 2011CLASS ACTIVITY # 10 TRIPLE JUMP QUIZDIRECTIONS: Answer the following questions on your own paper. You may use your notes anddiscuss with others. Write your name, date, Activity # 10 on your paper prior to turning it in tothe instructor.1. List the 5 phases of the Triple Jump APPROACH, HOP, STEP, JUMP, ACTION IN AIR/LANDING2. A beginner should take a longer / shorter approach SHORTER3. If the jumper begins the sequence with the left foot; which foot will be the take off foot into the landing pit? RIGHT4. If the jumper begins the sequence with the right foot; which foot will be the take off foot into the landing pit? LEFT5. The approximate approach distance for the triple jump is: 100 – 130 feet 130 – 140 feet over 140 feet6. Can the take off board distance be adjusted to accommodate different skill levels with both the long jump and triple jump? YES
  18. 18. KINE 2250 ‘COACHING TRACK & FIELD’ NOV. 7, 2011CLASS ACTIVITY # 10 TRIPLE JUMP QUIZDIRECTIONS: Answer the following questions on your own paper. You may use your notes anddiscuss with others. Write your name, date, Activity # 10 on your paper prior to turning it in tothe instructor.1. List the 5 phases of the Triple Jump APPROACH, HOP, STEP, JUMP, ACTION IN AIR/LANDING2. A beginner should take a longer / shorter approach SHORTER3. If the jumper begins the sequence with the left foot; which foot will be the take off foot into the landing pit? RIGHT4. If the jumper begins the sequence with the right foot; which foot will be the take off foot into the landing pit? LEFT5. The approximate approach distance for the triple jump is: 100 – 130 feet 130 – 140 feet over 140 feet6. Can the take off board distance be adjusted to accommodate different skill levels with both the long jump and triple jump? YES
  19. 19. PHASES OF THE HIGH JUMP1.APPROACH length, layout, beginning, transition, curve, last few steps1.TAKEOFF FOOT PLACEMENT, LEAN, ROTATION, BLOCKING ACTION2.BAR CLEARANCE HEAD, SHOULDERS, HIPS, LEGS
  20. 20. 1. APPROACH LENGTH 8 – 12 RUNNING STRIDES, STEPS 3 – 4 STEPS IN A STRAIGHT LINE 4 – 6 TRANSITION 6 – 10 CURVE LAYOUT MODIFIED ‘J’, USE NEAREST STANDARD AS BEGINNING POINT FOR STRAIGHT AHEAD MARKER, 10 – 16 FEET FROM STANDARD IS SAM, 40 – 70 FEET FROM SAM TO START, START + SAM + STANDARD = RIGHT TRIANGLE PYTHAGOREAN THEOREM – a2 + b2 = c2 – use a tape measure BEGINNING CONSISTENCY – FIRST STEP & STRIDE PUSH OFF WITH TAKE OFF FOOT, FIRST 3 – 4 STEPS IN A STRAIGHT LINE, STRIDES MUST STAY THE SAME; HOWEVER THE TEMPO INCREASES WITH SPEED TOWARD THE TAKE OFF, EYES FOCUSED ON STRAIGHT AHEAD MARKER TRANSITION START OF THE CURVE, STEPS 4, 5, 6, BEGIN LEAN @ ANKLES, EYES FOCUSED ON STANDARD CURVE LAST 4 – ( 7 – 10) STEPS, HARDEST TO EXECUTE, EYES FOCUSED ON JUNCTION BETWEEN THE BAR AND FAR STANDARD , ATHLETE IS LEANING IN TO THE CENTER OF THE CURVE FROM THE ANKLES, NOT THE HIPS, PRACTICE WITH RUN THROUGHS AND WARM UP CIRCLES
  21. 21. 1. APPROACH - MOST IMPORTANT PHASEDETERMINE TAKEOFF FOOT 8 – 12 RUNNING STRIDESLENGTH 1. FIRST THREE TO FOUR STEPS IN A STRAIGHT LINE 2. THREE TO FOUR STEP TRANSITION 3. LAST FOUR STEPS – CURVE GRADUALLY TO NEAR STANDARD “TOUCHDOWN” OR ‘PLANT’LAYOUT MODIFIED J – LEAN @ TAKEOFF 1. USE NEAR STANDARD TO DETERMINE ‘STRAIGHT AHEAD MARK’ Most important aspect of the take off is consistency. •Running mechanics – stride & frequency •Shape of the curve •Step one MODIFIED J – LEAN @ TAKEOFF
  22. 22. 1. APPROACH, CONTINuED….. APPROXIMATE 10 – 12 STEP APPROACH DEPENDING ON ATHLETE HIGH JUMP PIT STRAIGHT AHEAD MARKER 10 – 16 FEET 15 HEEL TO TOES 2TRANSITION Phase of ApproachStraight line – curve 19 WALKING STRIDESSteps 4, 5, 6 (10 step approach) 40 – 70 FEETBegin lean @ ankle, eyes change focus fromstraight ahead marker to near standard. 3CURVE - Last 4 steps in the approach 1•Generates rotations through body for bar clearance FIRST STEP = MUST BE CONSISTENT•Allows for vertical clearance – “jumping straight up” Steps 2, 3, 4, in a STRAIGHT LINE and landing safely in the pit Athlete runs in an upright manner, focused•Increases force athlete applies to the ground on straight ahead marker, gaining•Lowers the center of gravity momentum STARTING POINT – push off with takeoff foot
  23. 23. 1. APPROACH, CONTINuED….. LAST FEW STEPS LAST 3 STEPS MUST HAPPEN FAST! PUTS ATHLETE IN PROPER TAKE OFF POSITION STEPS 7 – 8 = NORMAL RUNNING STRIDE STEP 9 IS THE PENULTIMATE STEP, PREPARING FOR TOUCHDOWN (10 STEP APPROACH) PENULTIMATE STEP = STEPS 9 -10 SHOULD BE FASTER, QUICKER “DAY, TODAY” TOUCHDOWN FOOT ‘SWEEPS’ INTO POSITION GRADUAL LOWERING CENTER OF GRAVITY FROM THE HIPS TAKE OFF FOOT PLACEMENT -TAKE OFF FOOT POINTS AT OPPOSITE STANDARD BODY LEAN INWARD LEAN BACKWARD LEAN THIS BEGINS ROTATION START – CENTER OF MASS BEHIND AND INSIDE OF CURVE, IN ORDER TO JUMP VERTICALLY, CENTER OF MASS COMES FOLLOWS DIRECTLY OVER TAKEOFF FOOT ROTATION BLOCKING ACTION – FREE LEG AND ARMS SINGLE ARM, DOUBLE ARM
  24. 24. 2. TAKE OFF OUTSIDE FOOT IS TAKE OFF FOOT DRIVE OPPOSITE KNEE UP FOR BLOCKING ACTION BEGIN REACH WITH ARMS
  25. 25. HIGH JUMPIT IS A FOUL IF THE COMPETITIOR:Displaces the crossbar in a an attempt to clear it.Touches the ground or landing area beyond the plane of the crossbar, or the crossbarextended, without clearing the bar.After clearing the bar, contacts the upright and displaces the crossbar or steadies thebar.Fails to initiate an attempt that is carried to completion within the 1 minute definedtime period after being called.fails to go over the bar with the entire bodyTakes off with two feetUses weights or artificial aids
  26. 26. • High Jump standards placed a minimum of 12 feet apart • Once standards are set for competition, the base of the standard shall be marked. The standard bases shall not be moved during competition. • Non metal cross bar that weighs no more than five pounds (beginning January 2013 the cross bar must be circular) http://www.uiltexas.org/track-field/manualUIL TRACK AND FIELD MANUAL LOCATED ON BLACKBOARDPAGES 26 & 27
  27. 27. November 14, 2011Activity # 11DIRECTIONS:Place your name and date on a piece of paper.Answer the following questions. You may use your notes and / or work with others. 1. Approximately how many running strides are there to the approach in the High Jump? Answer: 8 - 12 2. What geometric design enables the high jumper to correctly identify his/her starting mark? Answer: Right Triangle 3. Name the three phases of the high jump. Answer: Approach, Take Off, Bar Clearance 4. Which foot, inside or outside is the take off foot for the high jump? (inside foot is next to the pit) Answer: Outside Foot 5. What does SAM stand for? Answer: Straight Ahead Marker
  28. 28. Activity # 11 10 PIT STRAIGHT AHEAD MARKER 7.9. 8. STANDARDS TERMS STRAIGHT AHEAD MARKER STANDARD STARTING POINT PIT STARTING POINT 6.
  29. 29. PHASES OF THE POLE VAULT:1. GRIP AND POLE CARRY2. APPROACH3. POLE PLANT AND TAKEOFF4. DRIVE SWING5. EXTENSION OR SWING UP, TURN, AND CLEARANCE
  30. 30. POLE PLANTAND TAKEOFFPlant acts as a ‘bridge’ to converthorizontal speed to vertical lift.Take off begins the moment thevaulter leaves the ground
  31. 31. ACTIVITY # 121. A TRIAL is an attempt in a jumping event. Each competitor is allowed a specified number of trials in the horizontal events.2. A FLIGHT is a round of trials for a group of competitors in jumping event competition.3. To QUALIFY is to win the right to participate in finals.4. A FOUL JUMP is one which is counted as a trial but is not measured.5. Horizontal events include the HIGH JUMP AND POLE VAULT.6. Vertical events include the LONG JUMP AND TRIPLE JUMPLIST THE 5 PHASES OF THE POLE VAULT:7. GRIP AND POLE CARRY8. APPROACH9. POLE PLANT AND TAKE OFF10. DRIVE SWING11. EXTENSION, SWING UP, TURN AND CLEARANCE11. This phase acts as a ‘bridge’ to convert horizontal speed to vertical lift and begins theMoment the vaulter leaves the ground. POLE PLANT AND TAKE OFF
  32. 32. 1) Event Limitations. A contestant shall not be allowed to compete in more thanthree running events, including the relays, and in not over five events total.(2) Selections. No contestant shall be allowed to enter more than two of thefollowing events: 440-yard dash or 400-meter dash, 880-yard run or 800-meterrun, 1600-meter run, 3200-meter run. This does not prevent a 400, 800, 1600 or3200-meter contestant from running in the relays provided he/she is entered in nomore than 3 total running events.(3) Field Events. Contestants may enter five field events provided they are notentered in any running events.
  33. 33. 1) Order of Events. The events and order in which they shall be held, are:(A) Running Events.(i) 3200-meter run: girls; boys(ii) 400-meter relay: girls; boys(iii) 800-meter run: girls; boys(iv) Girls’ 100-meter hurdles (33”)(v) Boys’ 110-meter hurdles (39”)(vi) 100-meter dash: girls, boys(vii) 800-meter relay: girls; boys(viii) 400-meter dash: girls; boys(ix) Girls’ 300-meter hurdles (30”)(x) Boys’ 300-meter hurdles (36”)(xi) 200-meter dash: girls; boys(xii) 1600-meter run: girls; boys(xiii) 1600-meter relay: girls; boys
  34. 34. Scoring System. The point system in scoring high school track meets shall be the same inall district, regional andstate meets.1. Points are as follows: 1st place - 10 points 2nd place 8 points - 3rd place - 6 points 4thplace - 4 points 5th place - 2 points 6th place - 1 point2. The scoring exception is in the relays, where: 1st place - 20 points 2nd place - 16points 3rd place - 12 points 4th place - 8 points 5th place - 4 points6th place - 2 points
  35. 35. n) INVITATIONAL TRACK AND FIELD MEETS.(1) Number of Meets. No student representing a participant school shall participate in morethan eight meets during the school year, excluding one district meet, the Conference A areameet, the regional meet, a regional qualifiers meet and the State Meet. Meets which are limitedto three or fewer schools, do not count as a meet for participants, provided there is no loss ofschool time. Each meet a school enters counts as one meet for each participating individual.Students are considered to be representing their school if they are wearing and/or using schoolequipment or being directed or transported by a school employee.(2) Cancellation. A track and field meet is considered a meet when one-half or more of the fieldevents and one-half or more of the track events are completed. If less than one-half of the fieldevents and less than one-half of the track events are completed, and the meet cannot becontinued, the meet may be canceled and does not have to count as one of the allowable eightmeets, unless there was loss of school time. A canceled meet shall be counted if there was lossof school time.(3) School Week Limitation. No student representing a participant school shall participate inmore than one meet per school week (the first instructional day of the week through the lastschool day). Exceptions: The Conference A area meet, regional and state meets, and districtvarsity meets postponed by weather or public disaster, may also be scheduled during the schoolweek.
  36. 36. (4) Day of Week and Starting Time. Students or teams representing a participant school arepermitted to participate in an invitational track and field meet only as listed below:(A) After 2:30 on Friday or the last day of the school week, or as early as the end of theacademic school day for all participating schools on a day preceding a holiday or break.EXCEPTION: A student representing a participant school may participate in a maximum of twomeets which start no earlier than 12:00 noon on Friday or the last day of the school week.(B) Or on Saturday or school holidays;(C) Or on any school day other than the last day of the school week with the followingconditions:(i) Students shall not miss any school time other than the in-school athletic class period.(ii) Events shall not begin until after the end of the academic school day for all schools involved.(iii) Schools utilizing this option are limited to a one day meet.(iv) A school or student participating in this type of meet shall not enter another track and fieldmeet duringthe same school week, Monday through Friday.(v) No event shall start after 10:00 p.m.
  37. 37. 1) Order of Events. The events and order inwhich they shall be held, are: ACTIVITY 13(A) Running Events.(i) 3200-meter run: girls; boys(ii) 400-meter relay: girls; boys(iii) 800-meter run: girls; boys(iv) Girls’ 100-meter hurdles (33”)(v) Boys’ 110-meter hurdles (39”)(vi) 100-meter dash: girls, boys(vii) 800-meter relay: girls; boys(viii) 400-meter dash: girls; boys(ix) Girls’ 300-meter hurdles (30”)(x) Boys’ 300-meter hurdles (36”)(xi) 200-meter dash: girls; boys(xii) 1600-meter run: girls; boys(xiii) 1600-meter relay: girls; boys 2. CAN A CONTESTANT ENTER THE 3200 METER RUN, THE 400 METER RUN, AND THE 1600 METER RELAY? YES 3. A CONTESTANT MAY ENTER FIVE FIELD EVENTS. TRUE / FALSE CAN THIS PERSON ALSO ENTER A RUNNING EVENT? NO 4. WHAT IS THE MAXIMUM NUMBER OF RUNNING EVENTS AN INDIVIDUAL MAY ENTER? 3
  38. 38. 5. HOW MANY POINTS IS A THIRD PLACE FINISH FOR THE 400 METER RELAY? 126. WHAT IS THE TOTAL NUMBER OF MEETS AN INDIVIDUAL MAY PARTICIPATE INEXCLUDING THE DISTRICT, REGIONAL, AND STATE MEETS? 87. FOULS: 1 MINUTE FOR COMPLETION AFTER STEPPING IN TO THE CIRCLE FAILS TO PAUSE BEFORE STARTING THE PUT AFTER STARTING THE ATTEMPT, TOUCHES THE CIRCLE OR THE GROUND OUTSIDE OF THE CIRCLE ALLOWS THE SHOT TO DROP BEHIND OR BELOW THE SHOULDER DURING THE PUT ATTEMPT TOUCHES THE TOP OR END OF THE STOPBOARD BEFORE THE PUT IS MARKED PUTS THE SHOT SO IT DOES NOT FALL WITHIN THE SECTOR LINES IS NOT UNDER CONTROL BEFORE EXITING THE BACK HALF OF THE CIRCLE LEAVES THE CIRCLE BEFORE THE IMPLEMENT HAS LANDED AND THE JUDGE CALLS “MARK” DOES NOT EXIT THE BACK HALF OF THE CIRCLEPENALTY THE PUT IS NOT MEASURED, BUT COUNTS AS A TRIAL 8. THE TWO TYPES OF THROWS ASSOCIATED WITH THE SHOT PUT ARE… GLIDE & SPIN 9. WHAT IS THE TEACHING AID (PICTURE) USED WHEN DESCRIBING POSITIONS WITHIN THE SHOT PUT RING? CLOCK FACE
  39. 39. 1) Event Limitations. A contestant shall not be allowed to compete in more thanthree running events, including the relays, and in not over five events total.(2) Selections. No contestant shall be allowed to enter more than two of thefollowing events: 440-yard dash or 400-meter dash, 880-yard run or 800-meterrun, 1600-meter run, 3200-meter run. This does not prevent a 400, 800, 1600 or3200-meter contestant from running in the relays provided he/she is entered in nomore than 3 total running events.(3) Field Events. Contestants may enter five field events provided they are notentered in any running events.
  40. 40. 1) Order of Events. The events and order in which they shall be held, are:(A) Running Events.(i) 3200-meter run: girls; boys(ii) 400-meter relay: girls; boys(iii) 800-meter run: girls; boys(iv) Girls’ 100-meter hurdles (33”)(v) Boys’ 110-meter hurdles (39”)(vi) 100-meter dash: girls, boys(vii) 800-meter relay: girls; boys(viii) 400-meter dash: girls; boys(ix) Girls’ 300-meter hurdles (30”)(x) Boys’ 300-meter hurdles (36”)(xi) 200-meter dash: girls; boys(xii) 1600-meter run: girls; boys(xiii) 1600-meter relay: girls; boys
  41. 41. Scoring System. The point system in scoring high school track meets shall be the same inall district, regional andstate meets.1. Points are as follows: 1st place - 10 points 2nd place 8 points - 3rd place - 6 points 4thplace - 4 points 5th place - 2 points 6th place - 1 point2. The scoring exception is in the relays, where: 1st place - 20 points 2nd place - 16points 3rd place - 12 points 4th place - 8 points 5th place - 4 points6th place - 2 points
  42. 42. n) INVITATIONAL TRACK AND FIELD MEETS.(1) Number of Meets. No student representing a participant school shall participate in morethan eight meets during the school year, excluding one district meet, the Conference A areameet, the regional meet, a regional qualifiers meet and the State Meet. Meets which are limitedto three or fewer schools, do not count as a meet for participants, provided there is no loss ofschool time. Each meet a school enters counts as one meet for each participating individual.Students are considered to be representing their school if they are wearing and/or using schoolequipment or being directed or transported by a school employee.(2) Cancellation. A track and field meet is considered a meet when one-half or more of the fieldevents and one-half or more of the track events are completed. If less than one-half of the fieldevents and less than one-half of the track events are completed, and the meet cannot becontinued, the meet may be canceled and does not have to count as one of the allowable eightmeets, unless there was loss of school time. A canceled meet shall be counted if there was lossof school time.(3) School Week Limitation. No student representing a participant school shall participate inmore than one meet per school week (the first instructional day of the week through the lastschool day). Exceptions: The Conference A area meet, regional and state meets, and districtvarsity meets postponed by weather or public disaster, may also be scheduled during the schoolweek.
  43. 43. (4) Day of Week and Starting Time. Students or teams representing a participant school arepermitted to participate in an invitational track and field meet only as listed below:(A) After 2:30 on Friday or the last day of the school week, or as early as the end of theacademic school day for all participating schools on a day preceding a holiday or break.EXCEPTION: A student representing a participant school may participate in a maximum of twomeets which start no earlier than 12:00 noon on Friday or the last day of the school week.(B) Or on Saturday or school holidays;(C) Or on any school day other than the last day of the school week with the followingconditions:(i) Students shall not miss any school time other than the in-school athletic class period.(ii) Events shall not begin until after the end of the academic school day for all schools involved.(iii) Schools utilizing this option are limited to a one day meet.(iv) A school or student participating in this type of meet shall not enter another track and fieldmeet duringthe same school week, Monday through Friday.(v) No event shall start after 10:00 p.m.
  44. 44. SHOT PUTRULES: NO TAPE ON FINGERS OR HAND MAY WEAR TAPE ON WRIST AND A SUPPORT BELT A LEGAL PUT SHALL BE MADE FROM THE SHOULDER WITH ONE HAND ONLY SO THAT THE SHOT DOES NOT DROP BEHIND OR BELOW THE SHOULDERFOULS: 1 MINUTE FOR COMPLETION AFTER STEPPING IN TO THE CIRCLE FAILS TO PAUSE BEFORE STARTING THE PUT AFTER STARTING THE ATTEMPT, TOUCHES THE CIRCLE OR THE GROUND OUTSIDE OF THE CIRCLE ALLOWS THE SHOT TO DROP BEHIND OR BELOW THE SHOULDER DURING THE PUT ATTEMPT TOUCHES THE TOP OR END OF THE STOPBOARD BEFORE THE PUT IS MARKED PUTS THE SHOT SO IT DOES NOT FALL WITHIN THE SECTOR LINES IS NOT UNDER CONTROL BEFORE EXITING THE BACK HALF OF THE CIRCLE LEAVES THE CIRCLE BEFORE THE IMPLEMENT HAS LANDED AND THE JUDGE CALLS “MARK” DOES NOT EXIT THE BACK HALF OF THE CIRCLEPENALTY THE PUT IS NOT MEASURED, BUT COUNTS AS A TRIAL
  45. 45. SHOT PUT TECHNIQUE – SPEED, STRENGTH, AGILITY, HEIGHTTWO TYPES OF TECHNIQUE:FIRST TECHNIQUE IS THE GLIDEGLIDE LINEAR FORM SIMPLE, CONSISTENT, EASY TO LEARN ANGLE OF RELEASE, HEIGHT OF RELEASE, VELOCITY OF RELEASETHREE PHASES OF THE GLIDE:1. STARTING POSITION ATHLETE FACES 6 O’CLOCK IN THE RING (“T” POSITION OR VERTICAL) WEIGHT/ CENTER OF GRAVITY OVER RIGHT FOOT (FRONT FOOT) 90 DEGREE ANGLE BETWEEN TORSO AND UPPER ARM EYES FOCUSED ON POINT OUTSIDE OF RING PUSH OFF SUPPORT LEG – NON SUPPORT LEG MOVES TOWARD FRONT OF RING 12 1 LOWER BODY BEGINS TO UPPER BODY FACES 11 2 FACE 3’OCLOCK 6 O’CLOCK 10 9 3 BEGINNING OF 8 4 “POWER POSITION” 7 5 CREATES TORQUE 6
  46. 46. THE SPIN Harder to learn, once technique is learned, should appear ‘effortless’ More opportunities for error. Shot Put Instructional VideoPHASES OF THE SPIN TECHNIQUE:1. STARTING POSITION “COWBOY POSITION” ATHLETE FACES 6 O’CLOCK1. WIND AND ENTRY2. DELIVERY X X R L

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