My Body, Myself, Our Problem: Health and Wellness in Modern Times

2,001 views

Published on

Key findings from Euro RSCG Worldwide's 2011 Health and Wellness study. 7,213 respondents in 19 countries.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,001
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
18
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
58
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

My Body, Myself, Our Problem: Health and Wellness in Modern Times

  1. 1. 1
  2. 2. Health and Wellness 2011 U.K. Ireland Netherlands Canada Belgium Poland France Germany Czech Republic U.S. Hungary China Mexico India Colombia19 countries BrazilCombinedpopulation: Australia South 3.6 billion Argentina Africa n=7,213 Extensive online survey created by Euro RSCG and fielded by Market Probe International 2
  3. 3. an exploration of a universalhuman concern 3
  4. 4. In the past, physicians had a Today, medical knowledgemonopoly on medical and tools are widelyknowledge accessible 4
  5. 5. In the past, treatments were Today, medicine is based onsuperstitious remedies and rationalism and technologyprayers 5
  6. 6. In the past, medical concepts Today, concepts andwere dependent on cultural practices are increasinglyfactors standardized 6
  7. 7. In the past, health was a Today, health is a majortaboo, a sign of God media theme all over the world 7
  8. 8. In the past: Today:_ Physicians had a monopoly on _ Medical knowledge and tools are medical knowledge widely accessible_ Treatments were superstitious _ Medicine is based on rationalism remedies and prayers and technology_ Medical concepts were tied to _ Concepts and practices are culture increasingly standardized_ Health was a taboo, a sign of _ Health is a media major theme all God’s pleasure or wrath over the world 8
  9. 9. WHAT’S THE NEXT MAJORSHIFT? 9
  10. 10. A new tension is driving a revolution in how consumers thinkabout health and wellness…Growing sense of Growing sensitivity tocontrol financial cost 10
  11. 11. the new tensionGrowing sense of Growing sensitivity tocontrol financial cost 11
  12. 12. Prosumers are changing thehealthcare equation—becoming increasingly informedand proactive in matters relatedto health and wellnessshifting balance of power awayfrom medical authorities andtoward themselves 12
  13. 13. what started with obesityis expanding to otherdiseasesfeelings of personalresponsibility stem fromsense of control Majority of survey respondents agree they have some/a lot of control over illness in general— reflecting understanding of role of lifestyles in modern maladies (people less apt to die of disasters or communicable disease in their youth, but of malfunctioning and decay of body systems over time) 13
  14. 14. In just about every instance, Prosumers are more confidentin their ability to control whether they get sick 80 Obesity 70 80 Sexually transmitted disease 70 63 Diabetes 55 66 Illness in general 54 60 Depression 52 Heart disease 51 59 Prosumers 42 Pandemic 37 Mainstream 36 Body cancer 32 31 % saying they Mental disorders 28 21 have a lot of/some Degenerative brain disease 21 control over Blood cancer 20 19 whether they contract these 17 Brain tumor 17 diseases/ailments 0 20 40 60 80 14
  15. 15. Mexico Colombia South Africa India Argentina Australia Hungary Poland U.K. U.S. No Control GLOBAL Control CanadaCzech Republic China Brazil Germany Ireland Sense of control over France illness in general also Netherlands influenced by cultural Belgium 0 10 20 30 40 50 factors 70 60 80 15
  16. 16. disease is no longer considered justbad luck but also bad management 16
  17. 17. under these new circumstances, howis the modern consumer exertingcontrol over his/her health? 17
  18. 18. we can’t change heredity or chance, but we can control behaviors and lifestyle factors that help or harm our health 18
  19. 19. the new tensionGrowing sense of Growing sensitivity tocontrol financial cost 19
  20. 20. even as we feel more empowered to take controlof our health, we are increasingly mindful offinancial perils of succumbing to illness lost wages doctor visits insurance rate hikes tests and procedureshospitalization pharmaceuticals 20
  21. 21. growing awareness of individual lifestyle choices contributing to collective burdenGraphic by Joel Hrubesch; source: http://www.insideec.com 21
  22. 22. governments overwhelmed byrising costs = reduced confidencein state-provided safety net 22
  23. 23. as a consequence, more 4 in 10 saypressure on individuals to companies should not be required toreduce financial burden they pay for healthrepresent coverage for employees who smoke 23
  24. 24. how did New York City choose to spend $31.1MMreceived in grants under Recovery Act?on anti-obesity and anti-smoking “interventions” 24
  25. 25. prevention is cheaper than cure—adding to pressure on individualsto “live right” 25
  26. 26. the new tensionGrowing sense of Growing sensitivity tocontrol financial cost 26
  27. 27. new sense of power over healthbrings with it anxiety… Am I making the right decisions? Which sources of information should I trust? What more could I be doing? 27
  28. 28. …and, often, leads to counterproductive feelings(e.g., guilt, embarrassment, shame, frustration) 28
  29. 29. creating new typologies of fear How can I protect myself and my family from things outside my control—e.g., cell-phone waves? How do I reduce the feelings of anxiety and stress that I know are bad for my body? 29
  30. 30. how to resolve the tension?Growing sense of Growing sensitivity tocontrol financial cost 1. Change your lifestyle 2. Change your relationship with your physician 30
  31. 31. how to resolve the tension?Growing sense of Growing sensitivity tocontrol financial cost 1. Change your lifestyle 2. Change your relationship with your physician 31
  32. 32. 75% of Prosumers and 63% of mainstream try to “listen” to their bodies more than they used toconnect to natural rhythms 32 32
  33. 33. embrace ancient practices andphilosophies Around 40% of American adults swear by some form of complementary and alternative medicine [U.S. News & World Report] In U.K., sales of complementary meds expected to shoot up 60% between 2011 and 2016 [Mintel] 33
  34. 34. protect and promotebrain health 34
  35. 35. the brain functions as body’s “controlcenter”: what we think plays vital role inhow we feel 4 in 10 believe “most illness is psychosomatic—it’s all in your head” 35
  36. 36. 6 in 10believe “powerfulthoughts can helpheal a person” 36
  37. 37. brain health seenas particularly worst bestvulnerable tomodern life bad for brain good for brain 37
  38. 38. focus on brain health intensifying aspopulations ageintelligence no longer considered “fixed” for life(brain as muscle to be “pumped up”) 1 in 4 believe computer games have positive impact on brain health 38
  39. 39. diet also growing in perceivedimportance as weapon in fight forlasting health 39
  40. 40. era of “superfoods” has elevated dietas a means to a longer, healthier life 76% of Prosumers and 63% of mainstream are much more aware of nutritional/health value of the food they eat than they used to be 40
  41. 41. 78% of Prosumers and 66% of the mainstreambelieve “food is as effective as medicine inmaintaining one’s overall health” 41
  42. 42. 91% of Prosumers and 77% of mainstreambelieve eating ahealthful diet hasa positive impact on brain health 42
  43. 43. And yet……only 37% trust the food industry to provideconsumers with healthful food… 43
  44. 44. lack of trust in food industry is particularly evident in Europe 44 44
  45. 45. …and 7 in 10 are moderately to extremelyconcerned about food safety 45
  46. 46. 67% of Prosumers and 58% of the mainstream worry aboutthe health impact of the artificial ingredients and coloringagents they eat and drink 46
  47. 47. how to resolve the tension?Growing sense of Growing sensitivity tocontrol financial cost 1. Change your lifestyle 2. Change your relationship with your physician 47
  48. 48. seek out additional sources ofhealth information67% of Prosumers and 52% of mainstream pay a lot ofattention to health issues and consider themselves wellinformed in this area 48
  49. 49. question authority 60% of Prosumers and 42% of mainstream are more apt to ask for a second medical opinion than they used to be* 62% of Prosumers and 44% of mainstream no longer automatically accept what their doctors tell them**Euro RSCG Worldwide, The New Consumer (2010)—U.S. sample 49
  50. 50. find or createsupportive health-centered communities 75% of Prosumers and 62% of mainstream say the Internet is a good source of information and support for people with health problems**Euro RSCG Worldwide, The New Consumer (2010)—U.S. sample 50
  51. 51. get empowered with newdiagnostic tools, at-home medicalequipment, monitors, etc. 51
  52. 52. be a smarter healthconsumer 52
  53. 53. act as your own primarycare specialist 53
  54. 54. KEY TAKEWAYS FOR MARKETERS 54
  55. 55. consumers are looking for brandpartners to serve as wellnessadvocates and make it easier to livemore healthfully 55
  56. 56. “Promise Keeper” app allows people toshare when they go for a run and tweetswhen person fails to exercise 56
  57. 57. Apple’s Design + Health kit is intended to help designersexercise, keep proper ergonomic posture at keyboard, andeat right 57
  58. 58. Swiss Life online health dashboard permitsconsumers to evaluate allergy levels and receivealerts about local air pollution 58
  59. 59. consumers are looking forproducts and services thatstave off mental effects ofaging 59
  60. 60. individualized productsand programs fit modernlifestyles 60
  61. 61. food for (improved) thought 61
  62. 62. bringing age-old health benefits to 21st centuryTracking quantity and quality of sleep and daily water intake 62
  63. 63. Old = scoldNew = affirmation 63
  64. 64. consumers looking for brands offering a senseof protectedness and peace of mind 64
  65. 65. 65
  66. 66. Ford Sync lets drivers monitor health on the go, including glucose and allergen levelstechnology for healthierliving 66
  67. 67. Conflicting and ever-changing recommendations have built up confusion around health—especially with regard to health values of specific foodsa need for clarityand reassurance 67
  68. 68. consumers long to reconnect with nature,in a holistic approach to life 68
  69. 69. 69
  70. 70. reminders of simpler, more “authentic”times and places 70
  71. 71. “Every patient carriesher or his own doctorinside.” –Albert Schweitzer 71
  72. 72. For more insights from Euro RSCG research, including the Health andWellness white paper, visit www.prosumer-report.comAnd follow us on Twitter (@prosumer_report) 72
  73. 73. Images courtesy of Creative Commons @flickr.com_ 4: xtopher42 (plague doctor) _ 29: stuant63 (fear)_ 5: Truthout.org (voodoo doll); Rosie O’Beirne (MRI) _ 32: thekellyscope (meditation)_ 6: rperlin83 (Vietnamese medicine) _ 33: CeeKay’s Pix (Chinese health balls)_ 7: Realistic Imaginations (will of God) _ 34: Digital Shotgun (brain)_ 11: Korean Resource Center (“For Health” poster) _ 35: dontcallmeikke (eye)_ 12: Cougar-Studio (crosswalk) _ 39: Ron Dressel (onions)_ 14: marymactavish (superheroes) _ 40: Bonita Sarita (honey)_ 15: ToastyKen (globe) _ 41: tantek (itsu)_ 16: DrewOtt (Chaos sculpture) _ 45: Microbe World (E. coli)_ 17: Jason Pier in DC (man flexing) _ 48: Neighborhood Centers (health fair)_ 18: David Feltkamp (Fitness First) _ 54: Polycart (shopping carts)_ 19: stevendamron (bills) _ 64: welshkaren (baby and dog)_ 20: urbanbohemian (medical bills) _ 65: LoopZilla (Boots Health Club)_ 27: sleepy.demon (anxiety) _ 68: DWinton (kayaker)_ 28: artfulblogger (dieting note) _ 71: Loving Earth (self hug) 73

×