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SPICE GP: Simulation in Physics class (The Archimedes principle) http://spice.eun.org Daniel Aguirre, Pedro Poveda School,...
<ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>The SPICE project </li></ul><ul><li>My GP: Simulations in Physic class </li></ul><u...
Arguments to highlight the importance of improving the scientific literacy: 1. The economic argument. 2. The utility argum...
<ul><li>Objectives:  </li></ul><ul><li>Collect, analyze, validate and share innovative pedagogical practices </li></ul><ul...
<ul><li>Actions: </li></ul><ul><li>Analyse and validate good practice pedagogies and practices in maths, science and techn...
Teachers and experts from 16 participating countries.  Defining 24 good practices (GPs) and characterizing them correctly....
Video in the lab Some examples of Good Practices: Difussion.
ICT in Maths Some examples of Good Practices: Use of Geogebra.
Basic science Some examples of Good Practices: Experiments with electricity.
Up to 24 Experiences that you can find at: http://spice.eun.org/web/spice/projects
 
Some examples of Good Practices: Inclined plane. Simulations
Simulations Some examples of Good Practices: Archimedes principle.
Description of my GP. Content involved: Static of fluids: Archimedes principle  Skills involved: Computer skills, use of s...
Motivation From a time to now, the use of simulations is a challenge to introduce ICT in class and try to get better achie...
Description of the good Practice The main objective of this GP is develop a didactic sequence to learn buoyancy and sinkin...
Presentation of Moodle course.
The Inquiry cycle Inquiry Based Learning (IBL)
Inquiry Based Learning Four principles to assure the integration of knowledge in the student: 1.- Make science accessible ...
<ul><li>Advantages of Inquiry </li></ul><ul><li>Through inquiry-oriented instruction students learn: </li></ul><ul><li>abo...
Ingredients of Inquiry: _ The  mission  of an inquiry activity. _ The  source of information  in an inquiry performance. _...
 
 
 
<ul><li>Didactic sequence: </li></ul><ul><li>Class 1. Inquiry lesson. To discover the main variables of buoyancy and teach...
Class 1. An Inquiry lesson. Variables: Shape Mass Depth Orientation Amount of water  Density of the sinking body Volume De...
Class 2. See worksheet in the moodle course. Surf over the simulations that have been proposed. Class 3. See worksheet in ...
Discussion: Simulations Vs. Lab Simulations Labs Less experimental errors More contact with real world More possibilities ...
But not every lab experiment is good… (nor simulation too)
 
 
<ul><li>Tips and tricks: </li></ul><ul><li>The simulations are most effective when integrated with guided inquiry activiti...
<ul><li>Conclusions </li></ul><ul><li>Inquiry improves the teaching-learning process of Science. (Improve motivation and r...
Discussion.
Thank you for your attention! Daniel Aguirre [email_address] [email_address]
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Workshop simulation in physics class

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SPICE GP: Simulation in Physics class (The Archimedes principle)

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Workshop simulation in physics class

  1. 1. SPICE GP: Simulation in Physics class (The Archimedes principle) http://spice.eun.org Daniel Aguirre, Pedro Poveda School, Jaén (Spain)
  2. 2. <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>The SPICE project </li></ul><ul><li>My GP: Simulations in Physic class </li></ul><ul><li>Inquiry Based Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Didactic sequence. </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusions. </li></ul>Outline
  3. 3. Arguments to highlight the importance of improving the scientific literacy: 1. The economic argument. 2. The utility argument. 3. The cultural argument. 4. The democratic argument. (Duit and Treagust, 2003)
  4. 4. <ul><li>Objectives: </li></ul><ul><li>Collect, analyze, validate and share innovative pedagogical practices </li></ul><ul><li>Promote inquiry-based learning </li></ul><ul><li>Enhancing pupils' interest in the sciences. </li></ul>The SPICE project
  5. 5. <ul><li>Actions: </li></ul><ul><li>Analyse and validate good practice pedagogies and practices in maths, science and technology, </li></ul><ul><li>Nowadays are mostly ICT-based, </li></ul><ul><li>And disseminate them across Europe. </li></ul><ul><li>The good practice criteria allow new projects to have guidelines to ensure their innovation and quality. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Teachers and experts from 16 participating countries. Defining 24 good practices (GPs) and characterizing them correctly. Each GP is tested in more than one country.
  7. 7. Video in the lab Some examples of Good Practices: Difussion.
  8. 8. ICT in Maths Some examples of Good Practices: Use of Geogebra.
  9. 9. Basic science Some examples of Good Practices: Experiments with electricity.
  10. 10. Up to 24 Experiences that you can find at: http://spice.eun.org/web/spice/projects
  11. 12. Some examples of Good Practices: Inclined plane. Simulations
  12. 13. Simulations Some examples of Good Practices: Archimedes principle.
  13. 14. Description of my GP. Content involved: Static of fluids: Archimedes principle Skills involved: Computer skills, use of simulations, problem based learning (PBL), learn to learn. Aims: Use of computers in an intensive way in the teaching learning process, increase the autonomy of students in their learning, get a better comprehension of physics concepts through computer simulations, show the physics laws more attractive to students.
  14. 15. Motivation From a time to now, the use of simulations is a challenge to introduce ICT in class and try to get better achievement in the students understanding of science.   Last researches focus in the idea it’s important how to use ICT. Not everything gets better results. We must be careful with the work plan, looking for an active role to students.
  15. 16. Description of the good Practice The main objective of this GP is develop a didactic sequence to learn buoyancy and sinking concepts (and the Archimedes principle) using computer simulations. In this design we do a combination of lab work and simulations to acquire best of both implementations, without forgetting our focus is to apply the concepts defined in the IBL (Inquiry Based-Learning) methodology. For this, we will define the process of learning posing questions more than giving steps to work and giving scaffolding more than descriptions of Physics laws. We will star from an experiment in order to provoke the reflection and trying to challenge some of the misconceptions students have. (It’s very important to take into account the previous ideas about this topic). Then, we will design the sequence trying the students acquire what variables influence on this phenomenon and challenging their misconceptions looking for the creation of new ideas, closer to scientific ones. Only finishing the process we will introduce numeric calculations and formulas.
  16. 17. Presentation of Moodle course.
  17. 18. The Inquiry cycle Inquiry Based Learning (IBL)
  18. 19. Inquiry Based Learning Four principles to assure the integration of knowledge in the student: 1.- Make science accessible 2.- Make thinking visible 3.- Help students learn from each other. 4.- Promote lifelong learning.
  19. 20. <ul><li>Advantages of Inquiry </li></ul><ul><li>Through inquiry-oriented instruction students learn: </li></ul><ul><li>about science as both process and product. </li></ul><ul><li>to construct an accurate knowledge base by dialoguing. </li></ul><ul><li>science with considerable understanding. </li></ul><ul><li>that science is a dynamic, cooperative, and accumulative process. </li></ul><ul><li>content and values of science by working like scientists. </li></ul><ul><li>about the nature of science and scientific knowledge . </li></ul>
  20. 21. Ingredients of Inquiry: _ The mission of an inquiry activity. _ The source of information in an inquiry performance. _ The tools for expressing knowledge , to communicate what is learnt. _ The cognitive and social scaffolds that enable students to perform processes. Ref. Joolingen, W.R., Zacharia, Z.C. Developments in Inquiry Learning. In Balacheff, N. et al. (eds.), Technology-Enhanced Learning, 2009
  21. 25. <ul><li>Didactic sequence: </li></ul><ul><li>Class 1. Inquiry lesson. To discover the main variables of buoyancy and teach some features of the scientific inquiry. </li></ul><ul><li>Class 2. inquiry lab. To discover simple relations. </li></ul><ul><li>Class 3. Inquiry lab. To think deeper and solve more difficult questions. And prepare a presentation to the rest of the group. </li></ul><ul><li>Class 4. Presentations and discussion. Time to introduce theory and formulae. </li></ul>
  22. 26. Class 1. An Inquiry lesson. Variables: Shape Mass Depth Orientation Amount of water Density of the sinking body Volume Density of the fluid?
  23. 27. Class 2. See worksheet in the moodle course. Surf over the simulations that have been proposed. Class 3. See worksheet in the moodle course. Try to solve now in group and prepare an explanation to your colleagues.
  24. 28. Discussion: Simulations Vs. Lab Simulations Labs Less experimental errors More contact with real world More possibilities (if the simulation has a good design) Flexible Students can learn in every computer (schoool, at home,…) Cheaper, faster Students can confuse simulation and reality Real laws are present.
  25. 29. But not every lab experiment is good… (nor simulation too)
  26. 32. <ul><li>Tips and tricks: </li></ul><ul><li>The simulations are most effective when integrated with guided inquiry activities which encourage students to construct their own understanding. </li></ul><ul><li>We suggest: </li></ul><ul><li>Define specific learning goals </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage students to use sense-making and reasoning </li></ul><ul><li>Connect and build on students' prior knowledge & understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Connect to and make sense of real-world experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Design collaborative activities </li></ul><ul><li>Give only minimal directions on simulation use </li></ul><ul><li>Require reasoning/sense-making in words and diagrams </li></ul><ul><li>Help students monitor their understanding </li></ul>
  27. 33. <ul><li>Conclusions </li></ul><ul><li>Inquiry improves the teaching-learning process of Science. (Improve motivation and results). </li></ul><ul><li>Inquiry labs (real or simulated) can help to get a scientific literacy of our students. But it’s important a good design of the didactic sequence. </li></ul><ul><li>The teacher experience applying this methodology is something to take into account to get good results. </li></ul><ul><li>The simulations are most effective when integrated with guided inquiry activities which encourage students to construct their own understanding. </li></ul><ul><li>For getting better transferability: </li></ul><ul><li>Give a theoretical framework for the teacher, with tips and tricks, describing how to proceed in the classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>Write good and detailed worksheets for the students (but from an inquiry point of view, giving more questions than answers). </li></ul>
  28. 34. Discussion.
  29. 35. Thank you for your attention! Daniel Aguirre [email_address] [email_address]

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