Dead End or Breakthrough?

Where is International Development 
Cooperation headed after the Accra 
        High‐Level Foru...
Will a changing ‘Aid Architecture’ Help or 
           Hinder Effective Aid?




Presentation by Richard Manning, former C...
A Bit of History (1)
• Longstanding concerns about recipient 
  countries’ ability to manage aid inflows.....
• .......and...
A Bit of History (2)
• Rome High‐Level Forum, February 2003
• Based on work of DAC Task Force on Donor 
  Practices (which...
A Bit of History (3)
• Paris High‐Level Forum (Feb/March 2005)
• Larger and higher‐profile than Rome
• Strong ministerial ...
Accra HLF
• Main task: to sustain and build momentum, not 
  reconstruct agenda
• Monitoring exercise shows only modest pr...
Accra Agenda for Action: what’s new? 
          (1) OWNERSHIP
• Stronger statements on broad‐based ownership
• Commitment ...
Accra Agenda for Action: what’s new?
            (2) PARTNERSHIPS
• Reduce fragmentation; good practices and dialogue 
  o...
Accra Agenda for Action
              (3)RESULTS
• Align monitoring with local systems and build 
  statistical capacity
•...
Accra Agenda for Action
              (4) PROCESS
• Developing countries to design implementation 
  plans
• Re‐state comm...
Assessment
                (1) OVERALL
• Strong but not blind support for ‘Paris’
  approach
• Civil society influencing a...
Assessment
(2) CHANGING AID ARCHITECTURE
• Particular focus on official sources (non‐DAC donors), 
  but also CSOs. BMGF s...
What Next?
• Neither dead end nor breakthrough
• Dialogue needed internationally (where?) 
  and, in particular at country...
Will a changing ‘Aid Architecture’Help or Hinder Effective Aid?
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Will a changing ‘Aid Architecture’Help or Hinder Effective Aid?

1,974 views

Published on

Presentation by Richard Manning (former Chair of OECD‐DAC) on the seminar "Dead End or Breakthrough? Where is International Development Cooperation Heading after the Accra High Level Forum?", 23 September 2008

Published in: Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,974
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
18
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Will a changing ‘Aid Architecture’Help or Hinder Effective Aid?

  1. 1. Dead End or Breakthrough? Where is International Development  Cooperation headed after the Accra  High‐Level Forum?
  2. 2. Will a changing ‘Aid Architecture’ Help or  Hinder Effective Aid? Presentation by Richard Manning, former Chair  of OECD‐DAC
  3. 3. A Bit of History (1) • Longstanding concerns about recipient  countries’ ability to manage aid inflows..... • .......and about incoherence of donors • Highlighted by pressure for ‘results’ • Three parallel responses: • Sector‐wide approaches • the PRSP model • work on ‘donor practices’
  4. 4. A Bit of History (2) • Rome High‐Level Forum, February 2003 • Based on work of DAC Task Force on Donor  Practices (which brought in key multilaterals  and a group of a dozen developing countries) • Declaration (a last‐minute affair) brings  together harmonisation and alignment  agendas • Engages senior officials, not donor Ministers,  and has little field impact
  5. 5. A Bit of History (3) • Paris High‐Level Forum (Feb/March 2005) • Larger and higher‐profile than Rome • Strong ministerial involvement (and strong EU  position) • Some limited civil society engagement • Declaration a key reference: the five principles,  twelve indicators and targets for 2010 • Sets up monitoring system and two further HLFs
  6. 6. Accra HLF • Main task: to sustain and build momentum, not  reconstruct agenda • Monitoring exercise shows only modest progress  in changing behaviour • Evaluation suggests however a degree of impact,  though also need for more political input • Accra notable for much stronger participation by  Civil Society........... • .........and recognition of far‐reaching changes in  the aid landscape
  7. 7. Accra Agenda for Action: what’s new?  (1) OWNERSHIP • Stronger statements on broad‐based ownership • Commitment to joint selection and management  of TC, and more use of local and regional TC • Country systems as ‘first option’, and transparent  plans for undertaking Paris commitments • But several let‐outs, and this remains a difficult  area
  8. 8. Accra Agenda for Action: what’s new? (2) PARTNERSHIPS • Reduce fragmentation; good practices and dialogue  on division of labour; aid ‘orphans’ • Untying and local and regional procurement • Recognition of S‐S cooperation, with PD as point of  reference • Global funds to apply all PD principles. ‘Think twice’ message on new global channels • Closer dialogue with CSOs, including their  effectiveness • Fragile situations: apply PD but also DAC Principles
  9. 9. Accra Agenda for Action (3)RESULTS • Align monitoring with local systems and build  statistical capacity • Incentives and decentralisation • Aid transparency, mutual accountability, anti‐ corruption • Conditionality: good practice and transparency • Predictability: ‘full and timely’ info on annual  commitments and disbursements and ‘regular and  timely’ info on rolling 3‐5 year plans
  10. 10. Accra Agenda for Action (4) PROCESS • Developing countries to design implementation  plans • Re‐state commitments to PD and the 2010 targets • Implement global partnership on agriculture and  food • Improve indicators, monitor and report to Fourth  HLF in late2011: needs ‘institutionalised processes  for the joint and equal partnership of developing  countries and the engagement of stakeholders’ • Link to aid volume, and to UN processes (MDG  event, FFD and DCF)
  11. 11. Assessment (1) OVERALL • Strong but not blind support for ‘Paris’ approach • Civil society influencing and influenced • New generation of leaders ‘bought in’ • Aid transparency and predictability move up  the agenda • But not clear if Accra will lead to early  progress in difficult areas (eg country systems)
  12. 12. Assessment (2) CHANGING AID ARCHITECTURE • Particular focus on official sources (non‐DAC donors),  but also CSOs. BMGF statement important • Recipients value diversity and responsiveness of non‐ traditional donors: but issues over tying and  transparency • Some tension between recipients and (some) middle  income donors on applicability of PD principles • Traditional donors recognise that these donors  cannot be expected simply to apply PD targets • Lesson‐learning on global funds
  13. 13. What Next? • Neither dead end nor breakthrough • Dialogue needed internationally (where?)  and, in particular at country level • Centrality of recipient perspective: will be  challenging for both traditional and South‐ South partners –good!

×