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2013 Oxford Digital Humanities Summer School Workshop

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Impact as a Process. Eric Meyer and Kathryn Eccles workshop slides from the 2013 Oxford Digital Humanities Summer School.

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2013 Oxford Digital Humanities Summer School Workshop

  1. 1. Impact as a process: considering the reach of resources from the start Eric T. Meyer & Kathryn Eccles Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford Digital Humanities@Oxford Summer School 8th July 2013 @etmeyer @KathrynEccles #tidsr #dhoxss Slides at:
  2. 2. What is impact and why consider it? What do we mean by impact? • Reaching intended audience • Reaching new audiences • Attracting users • Attracting new usage • Enabling new research questions • Enabling new approaches to education
  3. 3. What’s the point?  Gather data for investors and stakeholders  Use your impact in future funding applications  Know that you’re reaching your audience  Be iterative and adapt  Develop and extend your resource  Ensure you’re a relevant part of the community
  4. 4. Where to begin?  Identify your audience and key stakeholders  Set your goals. What types of impact do you envisage your resource having?  What steps are you taking to ensure these types of impact?  Identify connections  What resources do you see as successful in terms of audience and impact?  Do you see your resource as part of a network of connected resources?
  5. 5. Measuring usage and impact What could you measure?  Users  Types of use  Awareness  Citation practices  Marketing strategies  Embedding
  6. 6. Methods Quantitative methods Webometrics Web Analytics Log file analysis Scientometrics / bibliometrics Content Analysis Qualitative methods  Interviews  Focus groups  User feedback  Referrer analysis Content Analysis
  7. 7. New methods Data collection: Social media  Twitter  Facebook  Podcasting  YouTube/Vimeo Data management: Visualisation
  8. 8. Digitisation and Impact
  9. 9. TIDSR: The first usage and impact study  JISC funded project  July 2008-April 2009  Looked at five specific JISC-funded resources  Designed to test the TIDSR methods and review them for the TIDSR toolkit
  10. 10. TIDSR case studies
  11. 11. 88% 63% 39% 63% 69% 7% 27% 35% 28% 22% 3% 7% 18% 7% 7% 2% 2% 7% 1% 2% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% HistPop BOPCRIS BL News BL Sounds Med Backfiles Use it regularly or frequently Use it on occasion Have seen it, but don't use it I haven't heard of it
  12. 12. 71% 51% 49% 36% 61% 29% 35% 34% 40% 33% 79% 69% 72% 60% 76% 96% 84% 90% 86% 82% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% HistPop BOPCRIS BL News BL Sounds Med Backfiles Important to my research Important to my teaching Important to field Would recommend
  13. 13.  Top Search Phrases: Histpop
  14. 14.  Perception: Specific niche community  Well known by target audience  Transforming access and usage patterns  User surveys:  Embedded in educational resources  Enhanced access to primary sources ▪ ‘Histpop made it possible to do a completely different project’  Continuing education, online resources, non- traditional learners
  15. 15. 9% 36% 53% 38% 43% 55% 36% 38% 50% 48% 36% 21% 6% 13% 10% 0% 7% 2% 0% 0% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% HistPop BOPCRIS BL News BL Sounds Med Backfiles Original version Original + URL Online version Other 46% 29% 35% 20% 43% 0%20%40%60% Have you ever published a piece based on your work in this collection? If so, how did you cite the collection?
  16. 16.  Time intensive, but productive if you are careful about what you ask!  Different stakeholders:  Project team: Positive view of the work only  Broader stakeholders: While the digital project was good, it also introduced tensions in the broader setting of the library  New kinds of serendipity, wide range of users
  17. 17. Engagement officer
  18. 18.  Historians? (would be looking at older articles)  Not typical PubMed users  Search interface issues / limited search  Clinicians? (would be looking at newer articles)  Not typically reading 100 year old articles  Other users?  Paths of discovery?
  19. 19.  Majority of downloads targeted more recent material – opening up of new resources to clinicians  More thorough and comprehensive searches  Historians reported more comprehensive search results (quantitative results)  Also reported increased browsing, greater serendipity, due to time saved finding articles
  20. 20. 7% 12% 16% 17% 31% 34% 45% 47% 51% 54% 58% 62% 71% 77% 83% 13% 11% 9% 30% 18% 29% 32% 38% 27% 24% 32% 36% 56% 50% 48% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Cornell Animal Sounds Sciper Histpop Chronicling America Fine Rolls Wellcome Medical Journal Backfiles Historical Directories Internet Lib of Early Journals BOPCRIS Archival Sounds Imperial War Museum Old Bailey Online British Periodicals British Library Newspapers House of Commons Parliamentary Papers Non-UK Awareness UK Awareness
  21. 21. 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% HistPop BOPCRIS BL News BL Sounds Med Backfiles
  22. 22. http://microsites.oii.ox.ac.uk/tidsr/
  23. 23. http://simon-tanner.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/ the-balanced-value-impact-model.html
  24. 24. University of Oxford Podcasts
  25. 25. Proceedings of the Old Bailey Online
  26. 26. British History Online
  27. 27. Siobhan Davies RePlay
  28. 28. Quick impact  If you don’t have a lot of time or resources:  Twitter  Use it for quick polls  Put out news and look at your impact  Bitly links will give you click through data  User data  Keep in touch with your users  Use them to ensure you’re meeting their needs
  29. 29. http://www.rin.ac.uk/humanities-case-studies Bulger, M., Meyer, E.T., de la Flor, G., Terras, M., Wyatt, S., Jirotka, M., Eccles, K., Madsen, C.
  30. 30. The Case Studies
  31. 31. Browsing and Searching Libraries Journals Peers 79% 66% Google Google Scholar 59% 55% 62% 83% 48% 76% 95% Visit the library Browse library materials online Search library materials online Citation chaining Browse printed journals Browse online journals Consult peers and experts
  32. 32. It’s a huge change. You can do things much more quickly, read much more widely, find connections…it’s very, very important.“
  33. 33. What might take you several months if not years of research, you could do in hours, days, a week. So I think that means that it makes the nature of your research different because it allows you quantitative information much more quickly, which then allows you to maybe think about how you might use that information differently, because you’ve got so much more time. “
  34. 34. Eric T. Meyer eric.meyer@oii.ox.ac.uk http://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/people/?id=120 Kathryn Eccles kathryn.eccles@oii.ox.ac.uk http://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/people/?id=138 Oxford e-Social Science Project Project work funded by:
  35. 35. Possible discussion topics • Discoverability • of what? • by whom? • by what means? (manual, automatic, guided, etc.) • Citation habits and the link to impact • Community engagement • Engaging atypical communities • Enabling unexpected uses • Having the resources to measure your resources • Impact ‘agenda’ versus increasing one’s impact

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