The Competency Manifesto (Prehealth Convocation 2010): AUDIO EMBEDDED

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Embedded audio included with download if played with Powerpoint 2007. Discussion on competency-based evaluation and resources available to George Mason University prehealth advisees.

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  • AtulGawande speaking at Politics and Prose, photo by Emil Chuck.
  • http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/15/education/15medschools.html
  • http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/15/education/15medschools.html
  • http://www.aamc.org/data/facts/applicantmatriculant/table24-mcatgpa-grid-3yrs-app-accpt.htm
  • Wirtzberg quote: http://www.aamc.org/opi/holisticreview/resources/witzburg.pdf Taken from www.creid.ed.ac.uk/events/disabledlearners.../LTA_healey_roberts.ppt .
  • Source: http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa224/tcschell1260/Peeps.jpg .
  • April 5, 2003, UNC ballroom dance club practice with RobertasMaleckis (personal copy: Emil Chuck)
  • Title: Assessment of Medical Student Professionalism Development,MedEdPORTAL ID#: 1091Nowacek G , Blue A, Swick H, Crandall S, Luecht R, Eldridge C, et al. Assessment of Medical Student Professionalism Development. MedEdPORTAL; 2010. Available from: http://services.aamc.org/30/mededportal/servlet/s/segment/mededportal/?subid=1091
  • Title: Assessment of Medical Student Professionalism Development,MedEdPORTAL ID#: 1091Nowacek G , Blue A, Swick H, Crandall S, Luecht R, Eldridge C, et al. Assessment of Medical Student Professionalism Development. MedEdPORTAL; 2010. Available from: http://services.aamc.org/30/mededportal/servlet/s/segment/mededportal/?subid=1091
  • Multiple intelligence theory
  • Those students have mentioned what they have done for the interviews, what they wore, what types of questions the deans were asking and other types of information which I found very useful.The panel of accepted applicants was my favorite, because it allowed me to see the process more realistically in light of others who had already successfully passed through it. It was encouraging for me to see students from Mason getting into their dream schools. Most of the panelists highlighted the importance of other strengths aside from those that are academic in order to show oneself as a well-rounded individual.It enlightened me on some of the things I should do during pre and post application to medical student.
  • Career Services Workshops1) I found the podcast about interviewing skills very helpful as it discussed different strategies on how to prepare and what to do during and after the interview.2) I use the information to brush up on interviewing skills while practicing interview questions.MSAC InsightsI found the conversation with the prehealth committee interviewers to be most helpful. I already understood the importance of this interview but I did not realize the preparation that should go into it. I found it interesting that some of the interviewers come into the interview knowing your background and others choose to do a blind interview such as those done for residency programs. This changes my attitude towards the interview because not only do I have to justify my candidacy I also have to be an advocate for myself. Using this information I will research more about interview topics and make sure I have a good idea of how to answer these questions. Also I will setup mock interviews before my actual interview so I can refine my communication skills and make sure that I am clear and concise in my answers.Tell Me About YourselfThis track teaches how to summarize every important aspect of yourself in one minute. I will use this helpful information in my future presentations in research. Before I begin my presentation, I can concisely state my biosketch before going into my presentation. Thus, giving the audience some sort of familiarity with me.The track showed me ways to cut down my otherwise long resume in to something that I can share with others in one-minute. I often participate in seminars in which I present my research interests. Sometimes I find it difficult to say everything about me to fellow researchers within such a time frame, and I found the exercises and techniques on this track to be quite helpful in improving my one-minute biosketch.
  • http://www.latimes.com/media/photo/2010-08/55569444.jpg
  • http://farm1.static.flickr.com/124/388588880_82312593b4_m.jpg
  • http://muslimbarny.org/images/mentor.jpg
  • The Competency Manifesto (Prehealth Convocation 2010): AUDIO EMBEDDED

    1. 1. Picture Your Future in Medicine<br />PrehealthConvocation<br />Thursday September 2<br />Research I first floor<br />5pm resource fair<br />7:30pmStudent Organizations introductions<br />7:45pm Convocation address by Dr. Chuck<br />Mandatory for new and competitiveprehealth/premeds.<br />prehealth.gmu.edu<br />Summer 2009<br />Fall 2009<br />Spring 2010<br />Summer 2010<br />Fall 2010<br />Spring 2011<br />Summer 2011<br />Fall 2011<br />Spring 2012<br />Summer 2012<br />Sponsored by the Health Professions Advising Office (Student Academic Affairs & Advising), and the Office of University Life.<br />
    2. 2. The Competency Manifesto<br />Prehealth Convocation 2010 September 2<br />
    3. 3. The usual “getting into medical school content” <br />Prerequisite classes and grades<br />Entrance exam performance <br />Volunteering and shadowing<br />Community service<br />
    4. 4. It’s time for a checklist!<br />
    5. 5. How “the public” views admissions<br />“Peter Allen applied to 30 medical schools after graduating from the University of Pittsburgh last year. Twenty-eight said no. …<br />“His pre-med adviser told him that with his 3.3 grade-point average, he should apply only to osteopathic schools, but he persisted, and was admitted to The Commonwealth and New York Medical College in Valhalla, N.Y.”<br />“Expecting a surge in U.S. medical schools” by AnemonaHartocollis (Feb 14, 2010 NYT)<br />Peter Allen and Jessica Sidari, first-year students at The Commonwealth Medical College, a first-year school in Scranton, Pa<br />Credit: Niko J. Kallianiotis for The New York Times<br />
    6. 6. How prehealth advisors(?) view admissions<br />Comment #184: “I must laugh at the credentials that this white student has. As an advisor for pre-med students at an Ivy-league school, my Asian students with 3.7-3.8 GPAs in the sciences have a rough time even getting interviews. A 3.3 GPA is a laughable GPA and even more laughable coming from a school like Pitt.”<br />“Expecting a surge in U.S. medical schools” by AnemonaHartocollis (Feb 14, 2010 NYT)<br />Peter Allen and Jessica Sidari, first-year students at The Commonwealth Medical College, a first-year school in Scranton, Pa<br />Credit: Niko J. Kallianiotis for The New York Times<br />
    7. 7. AAMC GPA/MCAT (2005-2007 accepted %)<br />
    8. 8. “The system produces the result for which it was designed.”Bob Witzberg MD, Boston University SOM, AAMC Holistic Review Project<br />
    9. 9. Becoming a physician<br />It’s like growing your own garden… (like Farmville).<br />
    10. 10. Your Growth as a Prehealth Professional<br />Transplanting you to a new soil and a new environment.<br /><ul><li>Soil
    11. 11. Fertilizers
    12. 12. Light
    13. 13. Rain/Water
    14. 14. Pollenation
    15. 15. Temperature
    16. 16. Oxygen
    17. 17. Pesticides</li></li></ul><li>Not all premeds (coffee beans) are the same.<br />Coffee beans from around the world.<br />Hawaii<br />Yemen<br />Ethiopia<br />Colombia<br />Indonesia<br />Guatemala<br />Kenya<br />Brazil<br />And more…<br />
    18. 18. Becoming a physician?<br />Really: how do you stand out?<br />
    19. 19. Competencies and Learning<br />April 5, 2003, UNC ballroom dance club practice with RobertasMaleckis, Credit: Emil Chuck (personal)<br />
    20. 20. Attributes of professionalism<br />Subordinate one's self-interest to the interest of others<br />Adhere to high ethical and moral standards<br />Evince core humanistic values, including honesty and integrity, caring and compassion, altruism and empathy, respect for others, and trustworthiness<br />Incorporate self-reflection about one’s actions and decisions<br />Exercise accountability for oneself and for others<br />Deal with high levels of complexity and uncertainty<br />
    21. 21. Attributes of professionalism<br />
    22. 22. The future MCAT and admissions<br />
    23. 23. Evaluation applicant characteristics<br />Members of the MR5 Innovation Lab Working Group (ILWG) described a survey it administered to the Associate or Senior Deans of Admissions for medical schools about the importance of the following characteristics to medical students' success: <br />Integrity and ethics: behaves in an honest and ethical manner; adheres to ethical principles and follows rules and procedures; resists peer pressure to engage in unethical behavior and encourages others to behave in honest and ethical ways<br />Reliability and dependability: Consistently fulfills obligations in a timely and satisfactory manner; takes responsibility for personal actions and performance; has a service orientation; Demonstrates a desire to help others and a sensitivity to others' needs and feelings; demonstrates a desire to alleviate others' distress <br />Social and interpersonal skills: Demonstrates an awareness of others' needs, goals, feelings, and the ways that social and behavioral cues affect peoples' interactions and behaviors; adjusts behaviors appropriately in response to these cues and treats others with respect <br />Desire to learn: Sets goals for continuous self-improvement and for learning new concepts and skills; assesses own strengths and weaknesses; solicits and responds appropriately to feedback <br />Resilience and adaptability: Demonstrates tolerance of stressful or changing environments or situations and adapts effectively to them; is persistent, even under difficult situations, recovers from setbacks <br />
    24. 24. Goals of competency-based evaluation<br />Criteria should align with articulated technical standards of admissions (based on multiple personality theory). <br />“Legal compliance” arguments tend to have more resistance to acceptance.<br />Criteria should be transparent and independent of professional degree pursued by applicant to should reflect qualities desired for an interprofessional health care workforce.<br />Can compare pools of applicants in the same year for different paths.<br />Applicants should become familiar with competency-based evaluations as it will be a facet of their professional training and practice.<br />Criteria should assist students with self-evaluation and references with confirmatory evaluation (360-evaluation)<br />Quantitative measures should inform advising, program evaluation, and admissions outcomes.<br />
    25. 25. GMU Prehealth Evaluation Rubric<br />Compare to technical standards of admissions<br />Academic foundation (science and non-science breadth/rigor)<br />Scholarship and lifelong learning (problem-solving, research, entrepreneurship)<br />Social intelligence (interpersonal, teamwork, mentors)<br />Personal awareness (maturity, ethics, resiliency)<br />Managerial experience (time, financial, project, leadership)<br />Aesthetic or observational skills (art, music, literature)<br />Kinesthetic dexterity (lab methods, sculpture, electronics)<br />Communications skills (written/oral English, other)<br />Knowledge of the profession and health care system<br />Evaluators usually cannot comment on specific fitwith institutional mission and culture! <br />
    26. 26. Competencies and Recommendations<br />Newcomer: just starting out.<br />Novice: follows instructions without questioning.<br />Intermediate: memorizes steps, needs more practice.<br />Proficient: can perform the tasks satisfactorily (minor difficulties).<br />Competent: fluent; can improve the task/outcome by making minor adjustments.<br />Expert: tests improvements to tasks in a systematic manner.<br />Master: honored for exceptional skill development.<br />No/Concern: general newcomer/novice to competency concepts.<br />General: generally satisfactory/proficient in competencies<br />Strong: shows additional development (competent) with competencies<br />Enthusiastic: generally expert in competencies<br />Highly: consistently honored (especially by peer review processes) to be exceptional<br />
    27. 27. How do you rate yourself?<br />Annual survey 2010/2011 self-assessment<br />
    28. 28. Advisees Pipeline<br />
    29. 29. Academic foundation<br />
    30. 30. Emotional intelligence<br />
    31. 31. Reapplicants should re-interview.<br />
    32. 32. Likelihood of success<br />Solicited professors<br />MSAC Interviewers<br />
    33. 33. Competencies and Recommendations<br />Newcomer: just starting out.<br />Novice: follows instructions without questioning.<br />Intermediate: memorizes steps, needs more practice.<br />Proficient: can perform the tasks satisfactorily (minor difficulties).<br />Competent: fluent; can improve the task/outcome by making minor adjustments.<br />Expert: tests improvements to tasks in a systematic manner.<br />Master: honored for exceptional skill development.<br />No/Concern: general newcomer/novice to competency concepts.<br />General: generally satisfactory/proficient in competencies<br />Strong: shows additional development (competent) with competencies<br />Enthusiastic: generally expert in competencies<br />Highly: consistently honored (especially by peer review processes) to be exceptional<br />
    34. 34. Average GPA’s (EY 2010 applicants)<br />PRELIMINARY admissions decisions (GMU) as of August 29, 2010<br />
    35. 35. Average GPA’s (AADSAS EY 2010)<br />PRELIMINARY AADSAS 2010 admissions decisions (GMU) as of August 29, 2010<br />
    36. 36. Average GPA’s (AMCAS EY 2010)<br />PRELIMINARY AMCAS 2010 admissions decisions (GMU) as of August 29, 2010<br />
    37. 37. EY2010 application results<br />
    38. 38. How GMU advisees use prehealth resources<br />
    39. 39. Required reading<br />AAMC Medical School Admissions Requirements (MSAR)<br />Chapters 1-14.<br />AACOM College Information Book<br />ADEA Official Guide to Dental Schools<br />Chapters 1-5.<br />Health Professions Admissions Guide<br />On reserve in JC library<br />
    40. 40. Typical communications I get…<br />Hi, Dr. Chuck. I’m a premed at Mason and I wanted to know what classes I needed to take. Should I really major in biology?<br />When should I take the MCAT/DAT/PCAT/OAT?<br />Where should I volunteer? How many hours?<br />Where/When/What is prehealth convocation?<br />
    41. 41. Prehealth Advising<br />Website is the online “handbook” for all prehealth advisees and alumni who intend to apply.<br />Updated occasionally<br />Advisees (those who have not completed prerequisites)<br />Preapplicants (those preparing applications; need committee letters)<br />Applicants (those who submitted applications and pursue interviews/offers)<br />
    42. 42. Comments by preapplicants<br />The Pre-Health Advising site is an under viewed gem. It is a resource that has the potential to make or break your acceptance into medical school.<br />All of the links under Advisees are very useful in providing information or sources of additional information.<br />The "Advisees" section of the Mason Prehealth website had a great amount of valuable information regarding professionalism, careers, volunteering, etc.<br />
    43. 43. Pre-applicants use of website<br />
    44. 44. Website hits (2009-2010)<br />
    45. 45. Prehealth Website<br />This page outlines all the initial steps new advisees must take to begin their prehealth journey.<br />Advisees > Orientation<br />
    46. 46. If you have questions:<br />Undecided majors or adding minors: Academic Advising Center<br />Allied health careers: Academic Advising Center<br />Declared majors on coursework: Department major advisors<br />Academic study skills: Academic Skills Center, Counseling Services<br />Mathematics skills: Mathematics Tutoring Center<br />Writing skills: Writing Center<br />Scientific research, volunteering, postbaccalauareate opportunities: Health professions advisor (MasonWiki)<br />Sophomore entry programs: Health professions advisor (Prehealth website)<br />This information is on the Advisees Orientation page on the website.<br />
    47. 47. Sidebar<br />Short information for advisees interested in a specific career option.<br />
    48. 48.
    49. 49. Science Foundation:<br />It’s NOT about taking the prerequisites!<br />It’s about applying the knowledge from your classes.<br />
    50. 50.
    51. 51.
    52. 52. Prehealth.gmu.edu website<br />Applicants<br />Steps Before Applying (Timeline)<br />Entrance Exams (Test Prep Options)<br />Sophomore Entry Programs<br />George Washington University Early Selection<br />Virginia Commonwealth University Guaranteed Admission<br />Centralized Application Processes<br />
    53. 53. New “reapplicants” page.<br />Based on popular questions asked, a page on the questions most reapplicants ask about the committee evaluation process has been created.<br />
    54. 54. The MCAT (or DAT, OAT, PCAT, GRE, etc.)<br />
    55. 55. Prehealth.gmu.edu website<br />Communities<br />Combined Degrees (Add a PhD)<br />International Applicants and Schools<br />Non-Traditional<br />Reapplicants<br />Transfers<br />Underrepresented<br />
    56. 56. Prehealth.gmu.edu website<br />Evaluators<br />Holistic evaluation and rubric<br />Medical Sciences Advisory Committee<br />Recommendation Letters<br />Administrators<br />Visiting campus (for recruiters)<br />Institution profile<br />Diagnosis Reports<br />
    57. 57.
    58. 58. Communication strategy<br />Listservs, Facebook, and iTunes<br />
    59. 59. Communications<br />Must subscribe to prehealth listserv.<br />Emails and open house/recruitment events.<br />Facebook “fan” GMU Prehealth Advising.<br />Interesting articles, event reminders.<br />Facebook “fan” GMU Undergraduate Research.<br />Research careers, Undergraduate Apprenticeships<br />Should receive Constant Contact periodic email.<br />
    60. 60. Weekly (more or less) newsletter<br />PREHEALTH-L@listserv.gmu.edu<br />ALSO be added to Constant Contact<br />email to receive weekly newsletter.<br />
    61. 61. courses.gmu.edu “WebCT/Blackboard” site<br />Must be manually enrolled by Dr. Chuck with your GMU email address!<br />
    62. 62.
    63. 63. Facebook “fan” page<br />
    64. 64. Facebook fan page interactions<br />
    65. 65. Other Facebook fan pages<br />AAMC<br />AMCAS<br />Aspiring Docs<br />SMDEP<br />ADEA<br />NIH<br />PharmCAS<br />Optometry program admissions offices<br />
    66. 66. Podcasts.gmu.edu<br />Log to launch iTunesU for GMU.<br />Also open iTunes and search for George Mason Prehealth.<br />
    67. 67. iTunesU site<br />41/172 claimed to have subscribed to the GMU PrehealthiTunesU.<br />
    68. 68. Favorite iTunesU tracks<br />Accepted Students Panels<br />EY2009, NEAAHP 2007, AACOM 2010<br />Application Services Presentations<br />Convocation Addresses<br />The First Lecture (2008)<br />Great Expectations (2009)<br />
    69. 69. iTunesU site<br />If you logged into podcasts.gmu.edu:<br />iTunesU site will show a “GMU-only files” tab.<br />EY2010 Accepted Students Panel (4/30/2010).<br />This recording will move over to “Others’ presentations” in October/November.<br />AED/VCU Consortium discussion (4/13/2010).<br />This recording will move over to “Others’ presentations” in October/November.<br />
    70. 70. AMCAS 2010 presentation (2009)<br />Q&A with potential AMCAS 2009 applicants.<br />
    71. 71. Central Admissions Officers presentations (Chicago 2008)<br />Presentations to advisors from administrators representing PharmCAS, VMCAS, AACPMAS, and PTCAS.<br />
    72. 72. Favorite iTunesU tracks<br />Interviewing Skills<br />Career Services Workshop Presentations<br />Insights from Medical Sciences Advisory Committee<br />Tell Me About Yourself: The One Minute Biosketch<br />
    73. 73. On reserve (JC library)<br />Test Prep sample textbooks<br />Admissions guides<br />Writing Sample guides<br />Interviewing Prep<br />Admissions brochures & DVD’s<br />Career guides<br />Recommended books to read<br />NEW: DVD of Kaplan Medical School Insider Webinar (2010)<br />
    74. 74. If you don’t want my advice…<br />The not-comprehensive set of sites I have used…<br />Other than:<br /><ul><li>Application Services links (AMCAS, AACOMAS, AADSAS, etc.)
    75. 75. Student Doctor Network
    76. 76. OldPremeds.org
    77. 77. Explore Health Careers.com
    78. 78. AspiringDocs.org
    79. 79. SMDEP website
    80. 80. Other prehealth advising office websites</li></li></ul><li>University of Chicago Pritzker Podcasts and Chats<br />Produced by medical students (Ben Ferguson MSTP) and admissions staff.<br />Also on iTunes, with a blog and transcripts.<br />http://pritzkerpodcast.com<br />
    81. 81. Radio Rounds webcast and podcast<br />Student-produced at the Boonshoft School of Medicine at Wright State University<br />Episode 402: About the White Coat Ceremony.<br />http://www.radiorounds.org/<br />
    82. 82. Teach for America<br />
    83. 83. NIH Office of Intramural Training and Education<br />http://training.nih.gov<br />
    84. 84. NIH OITE Prior Events Archive<br />https://www.training.nih.gov/events/prior<br />
    85. 85. NIH Training Programs Office<br />https://www.training.nih.gov/programs<br />
    86. 86. “The Top Premed”Dr. Sean Amos<br />The “Pre Med Show” with Sean<br />(thetoppremed.com)<br />Immediate past episodes<br /><ul><li>How to Excel in School (Exams)
    87. 87. Three things I wish I had known before starting medical school
    88. 88. Getting into medical school without spectacular MCAT scores and GPA
    89. 89. Make This Year a Great Year
    90. 90. Sexy Premed “Porsche Instead” (music video)
    91. 91. Do You Have to Volunteer to Get Into Medical School?
    92. 92. College & Med School Dating Rules (for the Guys)</li></li></ul><li>Science and health policy<br />www.nationalacademies.org<br />
    93. 93. The cutting edge of policy<br />
    94. 94. The cutting edge of policy<br />
    95. 95. National Academies workshops<br />
    96. 96. Erich Jarvis presentation (2007)<br />NSF Waterman Award recipient, HHMI Associate Professor of Neurobiology Erich Jarvis gives a presentation at GMU.<br />
    97. 97. HHMI Dialogues of Discovery lecture (2008)<br />Nobel laureate and then-outgoing HHMI president Tom Cech discusses his research.<br />
    98. 98. Gerstner Sloan Kettering PhD advisor visit 2009<br />Nobel laureate and GSK program president Harold Varmus (former NIH director)<br />May 2010: named to direct the National Cancer Institute.<br />“Varmus majored in English Literature at Amherst College, earned a master's degree in English at Harvard University, received his medical degree from Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons, and was trained in internal medicine at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center.” (New York Academy of Sciences).<br />
    99. 99. Virginia GovernorBob McDonnell<br />Town Hall meeting at Center for Innovative Technology, Herndon, Virginia <br />(August 24, 2010)<br />
    100. 100. Meeting Dr. Anthony Fauci (2010)<br />Cosmos Club presentation (DC)<br />
    101. 101. AMCAS 2011 presentation (2010)<br />Presentation of AMCAS 2011. to GMU prospective applicants.<br />
    102. 102. How to get great science LOR’s<br />Krasnow Institute seminars<br />Mondays at 4pm (Fairfax campus)<br />Chemistry/Biochemistry seminars<br />Thursdays at 4:30 pm<br />Molecular/Microbiology seminars<br />Fridays at noon (Prince William campus)<br />
    103. 103. Other opportunities to grow<br />NYCDC AIDS Ride (September 23-26)<br />We’re supporting Dr. Yuntao Wu and his research lab by raising $200,000 to accelerate their work to decode how the AIDS virus destroys T cells.<br />http://www.nycdc.org/<br />Science, Medicine, and Islam (October 20)<br />USA Science & Engineering Festival<br />“The Elephant Man” by Bernard Pomerance<br />GMU players (March 31 to April 10)<br />
    104. 104. Resources Mason Offers<br />Making Yourself a Better Applicant/Candidate<br />
    105. 105. Skills Development at Mason<br />UNIV 100 (and similar UNIV classes)<br />Academic Skills Workshops<br />Certificate in Academic Skills<br />http://caps.gmu.edu/learningservices/workshops.php<br /><ul><li>Multiple choice exams
    106. 106. Advanced reading skills
    107. 107. Scheduling & Time Mgmt
    108. 108. Motivation & Goal-setting</li></ul>Don’t wait until you get a lower-than-expected grade on an exam.<br />
    109. 109. Public Health & Policy at Mason<br />Global and Community Health<br />Information Sessions: Sep 22 (eve) and Oct 2 (morn).<br />Global Health Students Beyond Borders<br />MPH<br />Health Administration and Policy<br />MS in Health and Medical Policy<br />Center for Health Policy Research & Ethics<br />chpre.gmu.edu<br />
    110. 110. Evaluation applicant characteristics<br />Members of the MR5 Innovation Lab Working Group (ILWG) described a survey it administered to the Associate or Senior Deans of Admissions for medical schools about the importance of the following characteristics to medical students' success: <br />Integrity and ethics: behaves in an honest and ethical manner; adheres to ethical principles and follows rules and procedures; resists peer pressure to engage in unethical behavior and encourages others to behave in honest and ethical ways<br />Reliability and dependability: Consistently fulfills obligations in a timely and satisfactory manner; takes responsibility for personal actions and performance; has a service orientation; Demonstrates a desire to help others and a sensitivity to others' needs and feelings; demonstrates a desire to alleviate others' distress <br />Social and interpersonal skills: Demonstrates an awareness of others' needs, goals, feelings, and the ways that social and behavioral cues affect peoples' interactions and behaviors; adjusts behaviors appropriately in response to these cues and treats others with respect <br />Desire to learn: Sets goals for continuous self-improvement and for learning new concepts and skills; assesses own strengths and weaknesses; solicits and responds appropriately to feedback <br />Resilience and adaptability: Demonstrates tolerance of stressful or changing environments or situations and adapts effectively to them; is persistent, even under difficult situations, recovers from setbacks <br />
    111. 111. Honor Committee<br />
    112. 112. Prehealth Ally Safe Zone Training<br />Fall 2010 sessions: Sep 21 (Tues), Oct 13 (Wed), Nov 16 (Tue), Dec 03 (Fri)<br />Prehealth training session to be determined.<br />
    113. 113. Service Leadership Opportunities<br />http://clce.gmu.edu/<br />Leadership Mason Conference (Sep 25)<br />Mason Volunteers Program<br />AIDS Walk (Oct 2)<br />Volunteer OpportunitiesPetsDC<br />This organization assists pet-owning people with AIDS or HIV to keep their pets healthy and with them as long a possible.<br />
    114. 114. Multicultural Resource & Research Center with New Century College<br />
    115. 115. Prehealth Expectations<br />Success depends on how you use these and other resources.<br />
    116. 116. Gotta know the rules, or ask for help<br />Dustin Johnson, 18th hole, Sunday, PGA Championship 2010<br />Was ahead by 1 shot when he grounded his club in a bunker. He was penalized 2 shots to become ineligible to playoff for championship (August 15, 2010).<br />
    117. 117. Deadlines are important.<br />Take responsibility for not knowing the rules or deadlines.<br />Don’t whine for more points, for extra credit, for deadline extensions UNLESS it is really warranted.<br />
    118. 118. Find a mentor,be a mentor.<br />How are you perceived as a community leader? A spokesperson for George Mason University?<br />
    119. 119. Accepted Students Panel 2010<br />GMU applicants who successfully received offers of admission from medical, dental, and pharmacy reflect on the past year.<br />
    120. 120. Goals of Prehealth Advising<br />What fruit will you bear?<br /><ul><li>Exploring Career Options
    121. 121. Discover your passion for health care.
    122. 122. Select a major and well-rounded classwork.
    123. 123. Become familiar with University resources
    124. 124. Become informed of challenges to health care delivery.
    125. 125. Developing credentials
    126. 126. Understand the criteria for success.
    127. 127. Identify mentors.
    128. 128. Practice communications skills.
    129. 129. Develop professionalism and cultural competency.
    130. 130. Preparing the application.
    131. 131. Evaluate academic opportunities.
    132. 132. Understand the evaluation process.
    133. 133. Understand the application process.
    134. 134. Planning for the future.
    135. 135. Seek financial aid information.
    136. 136. Develop short-term professional goals.</li></li></ul><li>Raffles<br />Must be present to win.<br />GMU Thumb Drives (2MB)<br />Completed Annual Welcome Week Survey by 8/31.<br />Free Kaplan Test Prep class<br />Completed Annual Welcome Week Survey by 8/31.<br />EY2012 applicants only.<br />Must start class before June 30, 2011.<br />

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