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Mark Your Calendar

NOV.

27

Fantasy of Trees
9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Nov. 27
3 p.m. to 9 p.m. Nov. 28 (Thanksgiving)
9 a.m. to ...
Spotlight
4
NOW

FLETCH club
Membership is $18 a month.
Visit www.etch.com/FLETCH to join. Your
monthly donation provides ...
4

It’s About Children, Issue 3 • 2013
Photo by Expressive Moments Photography

THE
WILL
TO
ACHIEVE
by Jason Dixon

All children encounter barriers to
overcome i...
H

 		
arper Alm’s obstacles began even before she was 	
		
born. Not only was she diagnosed with Down
		
syndrome, Harper...
Family
Care
	 Harper isn’t the only child the Alms
have trusted Children’s Hospital to
treat.
	 When Harper’s big sister E...
‘

Jamie s
Journey

Photos by Neil Crosby

For the first time in eight years, he can hear fully.
by Erica Estep
	
Imagine ...
Donate at www.etch.com/ItsAboutChildren

9
continued from page 8

the purpose of his visit was to flip a switch
needed to open a whole new world of sound.
	
Accordin...
Donate at www.etch.com/ItsAboutChildren

11
12

It’s About Children, Issue 3 • 2013
or
ef
er
H
ild
ch
ur
yo
In the

t of an
even

y
rgenc
eme

n, M.D.
n Redma
by Rya id Luttrell
Photo by

Dav

 	
As a paren...
News

Our Neonatal Intensive
Care Unit takes care of
about 700 premature
and critically ill newborns
each year.

Growing f...
Make Plans Now To Attend Our Annual

Experience Christmas on Main Street with something for the entire family.
• Designer ...
Your Dollars at Work

A night of music and celebration

	
Center Stage was a special night—a celebration of the work
that ...
Golfers tee up for children

	
With 244 participants, this year’s
Peyton Manning Golf Classic was a great
success—raising ...
Your Dollars at Work

Putting muscle into their support

	
50' Closer to a Cure, a group of athletes from Massachusetts
th...
Planning for the future

	
The trustees of the Wade Travis estate donated
$1 million to Children’s Hospital. The donation ...
NON-PROFIT
ORGANIZATION
U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

2018 Clinch Ave. • P.O. Box 15010
Knoxville, Tennessee 37901-5010
RETURN SERVI...
It's About Children - Fall 2013 Issue by East Tennessee Children's Hospital
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It's About Children - Fall 2013 Issue by East Tennessee Children's Hospital

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Read the Fall 2013 issue of It's About Children Magazine by East Tennessee Children's Hospital.

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It's About Children - Fall 2013 Issue by East Tennessee Children's Hospital

  1. 1. Mark Your Calendar NOV. 27 Fantasy of Trees 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Nov. 27 3 p.m. to 9 p.m. Nov. 28 (Thanksgiving) 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Nov. 29 and Nov. 30 Noon to 6 p.m. Dec. 1 Knoxville Convention Center Tickets are $12 for adults; $ 6 for children ages 4 to 12; free for children age 3 and younger. Buy tickets at www.fantasyoftrees.org or at the door. Proceeds go toward the purchase of medical equipment at the hospital. NOV. 2 Extra Life—a 25-hour game marathon 8 a.m. In your own home Free to sign up. Ask your friends to support you. Visit http://extra-life.org for more information. All local proceeds benefit the hospital. 2 It’s About Children, Issue 3 • 2013
  2. 2. Spotlight 4 NOW FLETCH club Membership is $18 a month. Visit www.etch.com/FLETCH to join. Your monthly donation provides much-needed funds for state-of-the-art equipment that makes diagnoses quicker and treatments less painful for children. You will receive one of these bears with your membership. Through SEPT. 30 Curious George Merchandise Kohl’s Department Stores Books, plush toys, a backpack and note cards are $5 each. Visit www.kohls.com for more information. All net profits from local stores will help fund our helmet safety program. OCT. 7 CPR class for parents and teens age 14 and older 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Children’s Hospital’s Koppel Plaza Building (Meschendorf Conference Room) Class costs $25. Call 865-541-8262 to register. Learn CPR so you can respond to emergencies in your home. Donate at www.etch.com/ItsAboutChildren The will to achieve 8 Jamie’s journey Three-year-old Harper Alm’s determination helped her walk before her second birthday, master fine motor skills and learn to say many words and phrases—like “thank you.” A young boy’s life will change forever thanks to a surgery at Children’s Hospital—one that allows him to hear fully for the first time. 12 Here for your child 14 Growing for your children We treat more children needing emergency care than anyone else in East Tennessee, so our team can handle everything from minor injuries to major medical concerns. We are set to launch a major expansion that will strengthen our ability to provide the highest quality of pediatric care. Connect with us: www.etch.com/ItsAboutChildren It’s About Children is a publication of the Marketing Department at East Tennessee Children’s Hospital. Editor: Paul Parson Designer: Deborah Hosterman Cover photo by Expressive Moments Photography 3
  3. 3. 4 It’s About Children, Issue 3 • 2013
  4. 4. Photo by Expressive Moments Photography THE WILL TO ACHIEVE by Jason Dixon All children encounter barriers to overcome in order to develop and grow, whether colds, broken bones or more serious challenges. For Harper Alm, an extra copy of a chromosome posed an unexpectedly high barrier. But no number of obstacles seem to last long in the face of her unique care and an enthusiastic perseverance. e ayn de P y Wa to b Pho Donate at www.etch.com/ItsAboutChildren 5
  5. 5. H   arper Alm’s obstacles began even before she was born. Not only was she diagnosed with Down syndrome, Harper was also found to have a congenital heart defect that caused one side of her heart to be underdeveloped. Yet it seems that to Harper, obstacles don’t stand a chance. When Harper was only 8 days old, her heart condition was repaired at Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital in Nashville; it’s a procedure that isn’t conducted at East Tennessee Children’s Hospital. She rebounded quickly from the surgery. “Last year, we received the good news from her cardiologist that Harper was becoming quite the boring heart patient,” said Kristin. “It was music to our ears.” Harper, now 3, has gone to Children’s Hospital’s Rehabilitation Center since she was 6 months old for treatment of physical and speech challenges associated with Down syndrome. She is known as a hard-working therapy patient with an irrepressible commitment to her development. “She’s an amazing little girl who’s full of energy and determination,” said physical therapist Deidra Seiber, who has treated Harper for about two years. “She is always happy to ‘play’ and works very hard to achieve her goals.” Ashley Henegar, Harper’s speech therapist, describes the type of activities Harper is engaged in to help her communicate functionally: she started by learning simple play like peek-a-boo; she later progressed to playing with objects like balls and baby dolls. Then Harper learned to identify objects, pictures, body parts and concepts, using simple sign language in combination with words to communicate. Harper even delights in using an iPad to learn, but she has also made progress with a simpler toy, a Mr. Potato Head she nicknamed Tato. She places the parts on the toy and tries to say the words. Her drive to try constantly to learn was once shown when she resisted help with Tato from a therapist; Harper wanted to put the eyes on the toy herself. The speech therapy Harper has received at Children’s Hospital recently yielded a major success. The therapy involved Harper attempting to say two words together. During a car ride in late June, Harper’s father, Michael, opened a bag of potato chips; he encouraged Harper to say the word “chip” before handing her each one. “She was having a little trouble getting the word just right,” Kristin said. “She finally blurted out, ‘I want bite!’” The family broke out in clapping and cheering—a response Harper insists on, and responds well to. “It was a proud moment,” said Kristin. Harper’s cheerful determination is an inspiration to those around her. “Most of our time is spent in awe of how incredibly sweet, loving and so very capable she is,” said Kristin. “She’s taught us to be more patient, more inclusive and more thankful. And in our journey with her, Children’s Hospital is just one of the things we’re grateful for.” Kristin appreciates the unique resources a children’s hospital brings to pediatrics. “Though we drive past at least three adult hospitals on the way across town to Children’s Hospital,” she said “we’ve never even considered taking our girls to any of those. We don’t know why parents would take their kids anywhere else.” Great Strides Harper’s family attributes a number of her achievements to the therapy she received at Children’s Hospital. • Harper walked before her second birthday, which is not universal in children with Down syndrome. She is now running and even beginning to jump. • She has mastered most fine motor skills appropriate for her age. • She has learned to say many words, including daddy, eyes, uh-oh, please, thank you and, of course, Elmo. She’s now attempting more two and three-word sentences; a new favorite is: Don’t like it. • She begins preschool this fall. 6 It’s About Children, Issue 3 • 2013
  6. 6. Family Care Harper isn’t the only child the Alms have trusted Children’s Hospital to treat. When Harper’s big sister Ellery was 13 months old, her parents discovered a large lump on the side of her neck, just beneath her ear. She was referred to Children’s Hospital for tests and to see ear, nose and throat specialist Michael Belmont, M.D. Kristin said Dr. Belmont was convinced a virus was to blame and advised them to resist the urge to immediately request an exploratory biopsy. “Our biggest fear was cancer—a hard pill for any parent to swallow,” said Kristin. “We know Children’s has an amazing Oncology Department and many families are dealing with this unspeakable situation every day.” Ultimately, Dr. Belmont’s suspicions were correct and the lump disappeared after a few weeks. Photo by Expressive Moments Photography Donate at www.etch.com/ItsAboutChildren Photos by Wade Payne 7
  7. 7. ‘ Jamie s Journey Photos by Neil Crosby For the first time in eight years, he can hear fully. by Erica Estep Imagine hearing the entire world muffled, like you have a cold or water blocking one of your ears. That’s how 8-year-old Jamie Fernandez has lived his entire life. “He just wants to be like other kids,” said his mother, Myra. “He says, ‘why me?’ and I’m like, ‘I don’t know.’ As a mom, I wish I could have that answer, but I don’t have it.” Jamie wants to hear the world like other kids. But, his right ear isn’t fully formed, so sound doesn’t register on one side. Jamie has struggled to keep up in school, and his speech was delayed. But, the young boy’s life was about to change forever with a surgery at East Tennessee Children’s Hospital. It would allow him to hear fully for the first time. 8 John Little, M.D., performed Jamie’s surgery, implanting a magnetic anchor for a new hearing aid. He’s the first child in East Tennessee to experience the new technology called the Sophono implant. “It’s an exciting thing to be a part of,” said Dr. Little, an ear, nose and throat specialist. “The implant goes beneath the skin into the skull and then creates a vibration. The skull is a very good conduit for transmitting sound and allowing the patient to hear it better.” “Dr. Little is not just helping us with Jamie’s surgery. He’s helping us change his life,” said Myra. The surgery was successful, and just a few weeks after his incision healed, Jamie returned to the doctor’s office. This time, continued on page 10 It’s About Children, Issue 3 • 2013
  8. 8. Donate at www.etch.com/ItsAboutChildren 9
  9. 9. continued from page 8 the purpose of his visit was to flip a switch needed to open a whole new world of sound. According to pediatric audiologist Alison Whittle, Au.D., CCC-A, Jamie will not only hear better, but be more rested, and even happier. Dr. Whittle described the experience as opening a window and bringing the sounds of the outdoors in. “He was saying constantly that he was having to lean his good side forward, saying I can’t hear you, talk on this side of me,” said Dr. Whittle. “That’s exhausting for anyone, especially a child. He won’t have to worry about that anymore.” Dr. Whittle patiently explained everything to Jamie before attaching the magnetic sound processor for his new hearing aid to the outside of his ear. She then asked Jamie if it was on. He just smiled and nodded his head, able to hear fully for the first time. Jamie’s mom sat behind her son and whispered his name. The 8-year-old’s big grin lit up his face, bringing tears to his dad’s eyes and a joyous laugh from his mom. “You can hear me,” she said. Though Jamie’s type of implant is a first for Children’s Hospital, the audiologist explained the emotional reaction from his family is something she sees often when a child’s hearing improves. “The tears in dad’s eyes, the excitement on mom’s face, the big smile, that’s something we get every single time,” said Dr. Whittle. “We see of lot of sad things here. Sometimes we have to deliver bad news. So this is good.” “I know I put my baby in just the right hands,” said Myra Fernandez before leaving the office. Jamie’s journey is just beginning. He will have reconstructive surgery on his right ear in the near future. It’s something he told his parents he’s looking forward to. Surrounded by mom, dad, his little brother, Oscar, and family friends, Jamie walked out of the doctor’s office to the sound of applause, ready to experience all the exciting sounds he had been missing. Jamie’s mom sat behind her son and whispered his name. The 8-year old’s big grin lit up his face, bringing tears to his dad’s eyes and a joyous laugh from his mom. “you can hear me,” she said. Visit www.etch.com/ItsAboutChildren to experience Jamie Fernandez’s emotional journey. 10 It’s About Children, Issue 3 • 2013
  10. 10. Donate at www.etch.com/ItsAboutChildren 11
  11. 11. 12 It’s About Children, Issue 3 • 2013
  12. 12. or ef er H ild ch ur yo In the t of an even y rgenc eme n, M.D. n Redma by Rya id Luttrell Photo by Dav   As a parent, you never want to think of your child being injured. However, if your child is involved in an accident, he needs emergency care quickly and in an environment that’s best suited for him. East Tennessee Children’s Hospital’s Emergency Department provides highly specialized emergency care for infants, children and teens. Because we treat more children needing emergency care than anyone else in East Tennessee, our doctors and nurses are equipped to treat everything from minor injuries to major medical concerns. We understand we are caring for patients who need a special kind of treatment—not only to make them well, but also to make them feel comfortable and safe. Our dedicated medical team is led by a group of boardcertified pediatric emergency medicine doctors. And our nurses and other team members all have special interest, knowledge and skill in the emergency medical care of children. Our Emergency Department team works closely with all other specialty departments in the hospital, including radiology, surgery and child life, to provide coordinated, comprehensive and child-friendly care. We have the only emergency facilities in the city to offer the services of Child Life Specialists who help our patients cope with the anxiety of being in the Emergency Department. They are there to distract children during painful procedures, talk a child and his family through each aspect of treatment and be an advocate for the child throughout his stay. We also have translation services available at all hours to help anyone coming to Children’s Hospital to fully understand a child’s condition and treatment. Our young patients also benefit from an Emergency Department designed specifically with children in mind. The décor is kid-friendly, which helps children feel more comfortable during their visit. Unlike adult hospitals, our Emergency Department has equipment made to fit growing bodies—from smaller needles and anesthesia masks to breathing tubes and blood pressure cuffs. In fact, many young patients who are initially taken to nearby adult hospitals are then transferred to Children’s Hospital because we are better equipped to handle their special needs. We have more than 72,000 emergency visits a year— averaging 200 patients each day—and are ready to treat children 24/7, 365 days a year. In our Emergency Department, children are protected from potentially frightening adult emergencies and inappropriate situations. And non-urgent patients are triaged to a separate area within the Emergency Department during evenings and weekends. We realize the Emergency Department is the last place a parent and child want to be, so we are committed to doing everything we can to make the experience as comfortable as possible. Not only can you be assured your child will be provided the best care available, but also know it will happen in a safe, child-friendly environment by medical personnel specially trained to deal with any emergency situation. Visit www.etch.com/ItsAboutChildren to see how our pediatric Emergency Department made a difference in one family’s life. Ryan Redman, M.D., is the Medical Director of the Emergency Department at East Tennessee Children’s Hospital. Donate at www.etch.com/ItsAboutChildren 13
  13. 13. News Our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit takes care of about 700 premature and critically ill newborns each year. Growing for your children   Children’s Hospital is set to launch a major expansion that will strengthen our ability to provide the highest quality of care to the region’s children. It will involve the construction of a new five-story building adjacent to the current facility on White Avenue between 20th and 21st streets. The entire project provides 245,000 square feet of new hospital space, 146 parking spaces and renovations of selected areas within the hospital. Groundbreaking is expected within the next 12 to 14 months and construction of the new building will take about two years. Renovations of areas within the hospital will take an additional year with an expected completion date of fall 2017. Key features of the project include a new 44-bed Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) with private rooms, a new perioperative surgery center and enhanced family areas, such as roof-top gardens. Patient families and staff have participated in the planning process since the beginning and will continue to play a large role moving forward. Estimated cost for the project is $72 million to $75 million. Though Children’s Hospital plans to pay for this largely with internal funds, we will look to the community for additional help. During construction, all services will continue to be offered at Children’s Hospital. Visit www.etch.com/ItsAboutChildren to see an artist rendering of the expansion. 14 It’s About Children, Issue 3 • 2013
  14. 14. Make Plans Now To Attend Our Annual Experience Christmas on Main Street with something for the entire family. • Designer trees • Holiday gift shops • Children’s activities • Continuous entertainment Nov. 27 to Dec. 1 at the Knoxville Convention Center Buy tickets at www.fantasyoftrees.org or at the door. Proceeds go toward the purchase of medical equipment at Children’s Hospital. Donate at www.etch.com/ItsAboutChildren 15
  15. 15. Your Dollars at Work A night of music and celebration Center Stage was a special night—a celebration of the work that happens daily at Children’s Hospital thanks to our generous donors. Funds raised will be used to purchase medical equipment for our Goody’s Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Our PICU team provides comprehensive care for infants, children and teens who are critically ill or injured. They may be dealing with life-threatening infections, complications from chronic illnesses or injuries related to a serious automobile accident or near-drowning. Organized in 1993 by Wendy and Robert Goodfriend and now headed by Kaye and Jeff Goodfriend, Center Stage is an evening of pure entertainment. This year’s event introduced attendees to rising country star Laura Bell Bundy. Attendees then put on their boogie shoes when headliner KC and the Sunshine Band took the stage at the Knoxville Convention Center. This year, Center Stage’s major sponsors were Pilot Flying J and the Goodfriend Family Foundation. Pictured above/inset: KC and the Sunshine Band had Center Stage attendees shake, shake, shaking the night away. Pictured at right: Country singer Laura Bell Bundy performed her latest single Two Step at Center Stage. 16 It’s About Children, Issue 3 • 2013
  16. 16. Golfers tee up for children With 244 participants, this year’s Peyton Manning Golf Classic was a great success—raising approximately $100,000. That total will be split equally between the PeyBack Foundation and Children’s Hospital, which will use the money to help purchase a Giraffe OmniBed. This is not just a bed; it’s a specially designed, high-tech care station for critically ill newborns. Manning, quarterback for the NFL’s Denver Broncos, was present and visited with golfers throughout the day. All of the money raised for his foundation from the golf outing will stay in this area. The PeyBack Foundation promotes the future success of disadvantaged youth by assisting programs that provide leadership and growth opportunities. This year’s Golf Classic once again took place at the Fox Den Country Club. Major sponsors for the event were Cellular Sales, Knoxville News Sentinel, On-Belay Medical Foundation and Republic Plastics Ltd. Former University of Tennessee football coach Phil Fulmer made a special appearance at this year’s Peyton Manning Golf Classic. A gift from the heart Chasity Lynn Roberts and Jeff Jennings, M.D. Donate at www.etch.com/ItsAboutChildren Chasity Lynn Roberts celebrated her 21st birthday at the end of July—a milestone that was shared in a special way. In her honor, her father’s employer, Norfolk Southern, gave a generous gift of $1,700 to Project ADAM Tennessee. Led by Children’s Hospital, Project ADAM Tennessee coordinates programs that help prevent sudden cardiac arrest. Cardiologist Jeff Jennings, M.D., with Children’s Hospital, is the medical director for the project. Roberts has been a patient of Dr. Jennings since she was born in 1992. Diagnosed with a heart defect that made her skin appear blue, she had three heart surgeries by her third birthday. Earlier this year, while visiting relatives in Alabama, Roberts collapsed during a Mardi Gras parade. Luckily, two firemen and an emergency medical technician (EMT) were nearby. They performed CPR and then used an automated external defibrillator (AED) to shock her heart back into rhythm. Roberts was airlifted to Children’s Hospital. Dr. Jennings had close contact with the family during the transport and was waiting on her upon her arrival in Knoxville. Roberts, who is doing well these days, plans to substitute teach at Northview Academy in Sevier County this academic year. Project ADAM Tennessee will use the money donated by Norfolk Southern to purchase an AED for the school where Roberts will be spending a lot of her time. 17
  17. 17. Your Dollars at Work Putting muscle into their support 50' Closer to a Cure, a group of athletes from Massachusetts that performs feats of strength to raise money for charities, helped raise $550 for Children’s Hospital at the Claiborne County Fitness Expo. It was done in memory of Katelyn Norman, who was treated at the hospital. The New Tazewell event was originally organized to fund items on Katelyn’s bucket list. Unfortunately, she passed away from bone cancer before the competition took place. Katelyn’s mother, Erica, insisted all the proceeds go to Children’s Hospital because of what the hospital had done for Katelyn. The money will go to support other children with cancer. Jeffrey Simons, the expo’s organizer, recognizes the importance of pediatric hospitals. “They provide tailored care to a very specific demographic of patients,” he said. “Not only do you have to provide care to the children, but you also must encourage and support the parents. We couldn’t be happier with the decision to donate to the hospital.” 50’ Closer to a Cure, the main event at the Claiborne County Fitness Expo, featured a competition between four teams of 10 to see which team could pull a fire truck the fastest. The group’s founder, Justin Sulham, pulled a 40,000-pound fire truck 34 feet uphill while team member Kristen White pulled an 11,000-pound armored army Hummer. 18 It’s About Children, Issue 3 • 2013
  18. 18. Planning for the future The trustees of the Wade Travis estate donated $1 million to Children’s Hospital. The donation will be used to help the hospital’s expansion. Though he had no children himself, Travis had a high respect for the valuable medical treatments Children’s Hospital provides to children in the region. He made numerous donations to the hospital during his lifetime. “Before he died in 2002, he set up a trust to support his wife and after she died, the remaining balance was directed to charities—the largest part of which is going to Children’s Hospital,” said Richard F. Warren Jr., attorney and one of the Travis trustees. “He was impressed with Children’s Hospital because it does not turn away families from treatment, regardless of their inability to pay.” Travis and his brothers, Leon and Hilliard, were the original Shoney’s Big Boy franchise owners for Knoxville and its surrounding counties. Additionally, the Wade Travis estate also gave $150,000 as a pay-it-forward donation to support Children’s Hospital’s annual Fantasy of Trees in honor of Shoney’s employees. Shoney’s has been a long-time partner and supporter of Children’s Hospital, and this donation will honor both Travis and Shoney’s connection to the hospital. Warren Jr. about our Baker and Richard F. e ger, talks to Thomas ildren’s Hospital. Th rse Mana U) during a tour of Ch Lori Smith, R.N., Nu nsive Care Unit (NIC to the hospital. atal Inte donated $1 million Haslam Family Neon de Travis estate, which e trustees of the Wa two men ar Donate at www.etch.com/ItsAboutChildren 19
  19. 19. NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID 2018 Clinch Ave. • P.O. Box 15010 Knoxville, Tennessee 37901-5010 RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED We always try to stay current with friends of the hospital. If for any reason you should receive a duplicate issue or need to update your address, please notify the hospital at 865-541-8723 or LAMadigan@etch.com. Sam’s Club Golfing 4 Kids Monday, Oct. 21 • Starts at 9 a.m. Gettysvue Polo, Golf & Country Club in Knoxville $ 325 for a team of four Call Patty Metheny at 865-694-2175 for more information or to register. Proceeds benefit Children’s Hospital. PERMIT 433 KNOXVILLE, TN

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