Culture

779 views

Published on

My stuff on culture

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
779
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
142
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Crystal Cathedral
  • Culture

    1. 1. 1
    2. 2. 2
    3. 3. 3
    4. 4. 4
    5. 5. 5
    6. 6. The generally shared knowledge, beliefs and values of members of society. Culture is conveyed from generation to generation through the process of socialization. While culture is made up of ideas, some sociologists also argue that it is not exclusively ideational but can be found in human-made material objects. …Culture and social structure are considered as the two key components of society and are therefore the foundation concepts of sociology. (Athabasca University online dictionary) 6
    7. 7. 7
    8. 8. 8
    9. 9. 9 This is what William Fielding Ogburn (June 29, 1886 – April 27, 1959) described as “Cultural Lag”
    10. 10. Technology and Production: Gerhard Lenski: Change from technology and economy leading to  organization of power stratification systems 10
    11. 11. 11 While transistor count increases according to Moore's law, overall performance rises only very slowly. According to Lanier, this is because human productivity in developing software increases only slightly, and software becomes more bloated and remains as error-prone as it ever was. "Simply put, software just won't allow it. Code can't keep up with processing power now, and it never will."[13] Jaron Lanier "One-Half of a Manifesto" (2000)
    12. 12. 12
    13. 13. 13
    14. 14. 14
    15. 15. 15
    16. 16. 16
    17. 17. 17
    18. 18. 18
    19. 19. 19
    20. 20. 20
    21. 21. 21
    22. 22. 22
    23. 23. 23
    24. 24. 24
    25. 25. 25
    26. 26. 26 According to George Herbert Mead (1863-1931), language is a central part of the socialization process.
    27. 27. 27
    28. 28. 28
    29. 29. 29
    30. 30. 30
    31. 31. 31
    32. 32. 32
    33. 33. 33
    34. 34. 34
    35. 35. 35
    36. 36. A human community, usually with a relatively fixed territorial location, sharing a common culture and common activities. There is cultural and institutional interdependence between members of the society and they are, to some extent, differentiated from other communities and groups. Societies are generally identified as existing at the level of nation states, but there can be regional and cultural communities within nation states that possess much of the cultural distinctiveness and relative self-sufficiency of societies. (Athabasca University online dictionary) 36
    37. 37. 37
    38. 38. 38
    39. 39. 39
    40. 40. 40
    41. 41. 41
    42. 42. 42
    43. 43. 43
    44. 44. 44
    45. 45. Semiotics is the study of signifiers or signs. Signifiers can be speech sounds, other sounds, or marks on paper. Then there is the signified which exists in reality but only needs naming. 45
    46. 46. 46
    47. 47. But signifiers can also be other things such as dress, pictures or visual signs, modes of eating or forms of architecture. Consider the following contrasts and comparisons: 47
    48. 48. 48
    49. 49. 49
    50. 50. 50
    51. 51. 51
    52. 52. 52 But I wish to express the notion of how symbols can signify a culture’s sense of historical character, or, Just the opposite: an obsession with the present only.
    53. 53. 53
    54. 54. 54
    55. 55. 55
    56. 56. 56
    57. 57. 57
    58. 58. 58
    59. 59. 59
    60. 60. 60
    61. 61. 61
    62. 62. 62
    63. 63. 63
    64. 64. Culture is the grooves we fall in to as we become socialized. The components of our culture (norms, mores, beliefs, etc) are specific to our group formation, whether it be bordered geographically or strictly by political borders. 64
    65. 65. 65
    66. 66.  People  Language  Social organization (kinship and network of agreements)  Ideology (belief systems/world view) 66
    67. 67.  Incest taboo  Social Structure  Belief in a higher power  Food quest  Clothing  Settlements  Fine arts  Social stratification  Kinship  Political behavior  Etc. 67
    68. 68. 68
    69. 69. ethnocentric |ˌeTHnōˈsentrik|adjectiveeva luating other peoples and cultures according to the standards of one's own culture.DERIVATIVESethno centrically |-(ə)lē| adverb.ethnocentricity |- ˌsenˈtrisitē| noun.ethnocentrism |- ˌtrizəm| noun 69
    70. 70. Nazi Party (Europe) American Nazi Party White Supremacy Fundamentalism: any Religion Capitalism Nationalism (with God on our side) Cultural norm differences: Food, marriage, religion, music, dress, language […] 70
    71. 71. 71 Cultural Relativism: Truth Is Relative Cultural relativism is the view that no culture is superior to any other culture when comparing systems of morality, law, politics, etc. It's the philosophical notion that all cultural beliefs are equally valid and that truth itself is relative, depending on the cultural environment.
    72. 72.  Female Genital Mutilation  Wife Burning  Honor Killing  Stoning Women for What They Are Wearing or not Wearing  Beheading as a Form of Execution  Censorship of the Press  Imprisonment for Political Expression 72
    73. 73. 73
    74. 74. 74
    75. 75. 75
    76. 76.  Should there be a universal declaration of human rights?  If yes, then what should be included?  http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/ 76
    77. 77. 77
    78. 78. 78
    79. 79. 79
    80. 80. 80 Also called the Linguistic Relativity Hypothesis
    81. 81. 'Human beings do not live in the objective world alone, nor alone in the world of social activity as ordinarily understood, but are very much at the mercy of the particular language which has become the medium of expression for their society. It is quite an illusion to imagine that one adjusts to reality essentially without the use of language and that language is merely an incidental means of solving specific problems of communication and reflection. The fact of the matter is that the "real world" is to a large extent unconsciously built up on the language habits of the group.' Sapir 1958 [1929], p. 69 81
    82. 82. 'We dissect nature along lines laid down by our native languages. The categories and types that we isolate from the world of phenomena we do not find there because they stare every observer in the face; on the contrary, the world is presented in a kaleidoscopic flux of impressions which has to be organized by our minds - and this means largely by the linguistic systems in our minds. We cut nature up, organize it into concepts, and ascribe significances as we do, largely because we are parties to an agreement that holds throughout our speech community and is codified in the patterns of our language. The agreement is, of course, an implicit and unstated one, but its terms are absolutely obligatory; we cannot talk at all except by subscribing to the organization and classification of data which the agreement decrees.' (Whorf 1940, pp. 213-14) 82
    83. 83. In an empirical test of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, John A. Lucy (1991) compared Maya speakers from southern Mexico with English speakers from the United States. Linguistic analysis showed that English speakers almost always identify a noun as singular or plural (“book” or “books”). Maya speakers often ignore number by using so-called mass nouns (such as “cattle” or “the news” in English). The Mayan language has more terms for the materials out of which objects are made (wood, metal), whereas English has more terms for shape (round, flat). When Lucy compared the performance of subjects from the two groups on a variety of cognitive tests, he found that English speakers more often recalled number and classified objects by shape, whereas Maya speakers rarely mentioned number and grouped objects made from similar substances. From Richard Gelles and Ann Levine Sociology: An Introduction 6/e 1999 83
    84. 84. 84
    85. 85. 85 The Amish - benign
    86. 86. 86 AGREE?
    87. 87. Bernardine Dohrn of the Weather Underground – NOT benign http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/weatherunderground/film.html 87
    88. 88. 88 Timothy McVeigh – VERY NOT Benign Bombed the Oklahoma City Federal building In 1995, killing 168, including 19 children and injuring over 600

    ×