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molecular buzz!

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molecular buzz!

  1. 1. Molecular Buzz! Estefania velasquez.
  2. 4. Proteins can be considered as the funds of the life due to its importance, and complexity; medicine and biology put all the efforts on investigation and research to avoid the failure or malfunction of these “construction bricks”
  3. 5. New Protein Structure Model to Inhibit Cancer Cancer occurs when the mechanisms that control normal cell division are mutated. It is well known that these control mechanisms are proteins and enzymes that “keep an eye” on the regular functions of the cell, such as division and differentiation
  4. 6. New Protein Structure Model to Inhibit Cancer Apparently the process of cell division is controlled by specific proteins and these are turned "on" or "off" depending on their function.
  5. 7. New Protein Structure Model to Inhibit Cancer Design and development of certain proteins may allow scientists to control the expression of mutations such as those expressed on cancer
  6. 8. New Protein Structure Model to Inhibit Cancer The identification and artificial production of the proteins responsible of cancer expression could be the future of cancer treatment  
  7. 9. Personal comment: Actually all the efforts to find the cure for cancer are based on genetic manipulation and experimentation but there is always an ethical discussion because of its secondary effects. Discovering and generating lab-made proteins that might be used as a drug shouldn’t create such a controversy.  
  8. 10. Chaperone System Guides Tail-Anchored Membrane Proteins to Their Destined Membrane   Chaperones are proteins whose job is to pack and transport those proteins that have been just sinthetized.
  9. 11. Chaperone System Guides Tail-Anchored Membrane Proteins to Their Destined Membrane   Chaperones can decode signal sequences in order to interact with specific receptors and new born proteines.
  10. 12. Chaperone System Guides Tail-Anchored Membrane Proteins to Their Destined Membrane   On this study, researchers found out that chaperones are not only destined to pack and transport proteins but help on the insertion of those proteins that were sinthetized to be membrane proteins.
  11. 13. Chaperone System Guides Tail-Anchored Membrane Proteins to Their Destined Membrane   Detailed biophysical studies shown that these chaperones are more complex because regulates its binding in the cytosol and the transport trough the cell to the membrane in order to insert the protein to the membrane.
  12. 14. Personal comment: Some diseases whose are characterized by the wrong expression of membrane receptors can be explained better, improving the physiopathology understanding
  13. 16. Medical application. Medicine have been using Virus, bacteria and parasites as engineered anti-cancer treatments, but proteins should be developed to hit certain targets (malfuncioning proteins) replacing them in order to reset the normal cell function.
  14. 17. Medical application. Not only cancer, but all diseases are caused by not well-functioning proteins that should be replaced not by genetical treatment but pharmacological, that way using created chaperones to anchor receptors to the membrane diabetes for example can be trated by expressing total working insulin receptors.
  15. 18. Medical application. Even though genetics have been evolving so fast on treatment for disease, some non-genomic drugs designed from protein studies might be created to treat illness; proteomics though works really close to genetics, so the future of medicine is resting over molecular biology.
  16. 19. Bibliography - Chaperone System Guides Tail-Anchored Membrane Proteins to Their Destined Membrane ScienceDaily (July 5, 2011) -New Protein Structure Model to Inhibit Cancer ScienceDaily (July 28, 2011)
  17. 20. Thanks!

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