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From tomatoes via genomes to biofuels – by public road. Developing a neo-Polanyian understanding of capitalism.  Mark Harv...
<ul><li>The tomato as probe and object in the transformation and variety of capitalism </li></ul><ul><ul><li>From Aztec ma...
Two major historical tomato re-configurations <ul><li>First,  the emergence of mass production for mass consumption 19 th ...
Economic institutions
Instituted economic process <ul><li>A radical conception of the ‘instituted’ – the abandonment of ‘laws of capitalism’. </...
Instituted  economies Polanyi’s two process economy Four transformational process economy Production Appropriation - excha...
Reconceptualising ‘the economy’ <ul><li>For capitalism, de-centering the market </li></ul><ul><li>Bringing in alternative ...
A ‘Great Divide’ <ul><li>The production and reproduction of knowledge in capitalism </li></ul><ul><li>Limits to commodific...
BOYLE’S LAW AND/OR SCHWEPPES SODA WATER  PUBLIC PRIVATE Differentiation and interdependence
Genomes and bioinformatics <ul><li>The human genome: public good or commercial knowledge market? </li></ul><ul><li>Patenti...
Understating the state <ul><li>Mark-Schumpeter and creative-destruction </li></ul><ul><li>Regulation theory and accumulati...
WILL CAPITALIST POLITICAL ECONOMIES SURVIVE? LAND AND WATER USE Petro-chemical resource depletion Biomass for energy and m...
Politically driven innovation in production and consumption <ul><li>Normal market mechanisms characteristic of industrial ...
Whither economic sociology: reconceptualising capitalisms  ? <ul><li>The shifting place of economy IN society </li></ul><u...
The reproduction of knowledge and the structuring of the lifecourse <ul><li>The progressive elimination of child labour, r...
Modes and processes <ul><li>Instituting flows of resources, and public rights over resources </li></ul><ul><li>Instituting...
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Mark Harvey - From tomatoes via genomes to biofuels – by public road

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Presentation by Prof. Mark Harvey (Department of Sociology, University of Essex)
March 18 2010
at the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research, University of Kent
"An overview of my work of the last decade, and its specific contribution to the development of the understanding of economic sociology and innovation. Covers a wide range of research, picking out the main features, rather than going into great depth."

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Mark Harvey - From tomatoes via genomes to biofuels – by public road

  1. 1. From tomatoes via genomes to biofuels – by public road. Developing a neo-Polanyian understanding of capitalism. Mark Harvey March 18 2010 School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research University of Kent
  2. 2. <ul><li>The tomato as probe and object in the transformation and variety of capitalism </li></ul><ul><ul><li>From Aztec markets to Tesco supermarkets </li></ul></ul><ul><li>A bio-socio-economic entity </li></ul><ul><li>Configurations of production, distribution, exchange and consumption </li></ul><ul><li>Articulation with the cultural, political and legal “tomato” </li></ul>
  3. 3. Two major historical tomato re-configurations <ul><li>First, the emergence of mass production for mass consumption 19 th /early 20 th century. </li></ul><ul><li>Innovation in consumption by consumers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hamburgers and ketchup </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Baked beans on toast </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Second, contesting models of retailer power Late 20 th century </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The UK supermarket configuration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Asymmetries of power </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Economic institutions
  5. 5. Instituted economic process <ul><li>A radical conception of the ‘instituted’ – the abandonment of ‘laws of capitalism’. </li></ul><ul><li>Variation – historical and societal </li></ul><ul><li>What is economic? What is an economy? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Embeddedness and dis-embeddedness </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The shifting place of economy in society </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Articulation with the legal, cultural, political </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Property, the employment exchange relationship </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Instituted economies Polanyi’s two process economy Four transformational process economy Production Appropriation - exchange Distribution Consumption Qualitative characteristics Control Spatial location Functionality - use
  7. 7. Reconceptualising ‘the economy’ <ul><li>For capitalism, de-centering the market </li></ul><ul><li>Bringing in alternative instituted economic processes: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Non-market (household, voluntary, collective, state,…..) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>State and politically instituted </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Introducing multi-modality into the analytical framework </li></ul>
  8. 8. A ‘Great Divide’ <ul><li>The production and reproduction of knowledge in capitalism </li></ul><ul><li>Limits to commodification </li></ul><ul><ul><li>public by default? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The instituting of the ‘public good’ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The dynamics of growth </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Industrial capitalism without science? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>An unsettled fault line </li></ul>
  9. 9. BOYLE’S LAW AND/OR SCHWEPPES SODA WATER PUBLIC PRIVATE Differentiation and interdependence
  10. 10. Genomes and bioinformatics <ul><li>The human genome: public good or commercial knowledge market? </li></ul><ul><li>Patenting and technological appropriation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>State private property: corporate public property </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Competition and interdependence between public and private </li></ul><ul><li>The emergence of new global public forms of knowledge production, appropriation, distribution and use </li></ul><ul><li>The polyvalence of knowledge and multimodality of capitalism </li></ul>
  11. 11. Understating the state <ul><li>Mark-Schumpeter and creative-destruction </li></ul><ul><li>Regulation theory and accumulation of capital </li></ul><ul><li>National Systems of Innovation or transition theory </li></ul><ul><li>Major historical examples of state-driven innovation – socio-technical transformation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Infrastructures: e.g. Public roads-private transport </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Education, health, welfare……. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>War economies </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. WILL CAPITALIST POLITICAL ECONOMIES SURVIVE? LAND AND WATER USE Petro-chemical resource depletion Biomass for energy and materials Global Climate Change Increased energy and materials demand Increased and changing food demand
  13. 13. Politically driven innovation in production and consumption <ul><li>Normal market mechanisms characteristic of industrial capitalism will not deliver </li></ul><ul><li>Major new technologies for food, land and water user, energy, materials, essential. </li></ul><ul><li>Politically driven economic evolution. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Not Schumpeterian or Marxist capitalist transformation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Consumer choice in the market place will not deliver </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Politicisation of consumption: choices on transport and energy infrastructures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Macro-political choices on agriculture and food, on global sustainable land and water use. </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Whither economic sociology: reconceptualising capitalisms ? <ul><li>The shifting place of economy IN society </li></ul><ul><li>Expanding the conceptualisation of ‘economy’ </li></ul><ul><li>Re-articulating economic with culture, law and polity </li></ul><ul><li>Exploring the dynamics of variation: a historical and comparative vision </li></ul>
  15. 15. The reproduction of knowledge and the structuring of the lifecourse <ul><li>The progressive elimination of child labour, rebalancing of the household economy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Adulting and re-gendering of the labour-force </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The continuous extension of scholarity, uneven and different modes in different economies </li></ul><ul><li>The emergence of retirement – neither commodification nor decommodification </li></ul><ul><li>The restructuring of the lifecourse – the lifecourse as multi-modal </li></ul>
  16. 16. Modes and processes <ul><li>Instituting flows of resources, and public rights over resources </li></ul><ul><li>Instituting ‘public goods’ and public economies, household, and voluntary economies </li></ul><ul><li>Differentiation and interdependence between modes: no markets without non-market economies </li></ul><ul><li>Lifecourses as manifestation of coordination between modes: but disruptive, tensions, re-articulations </li></ul>

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