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Slayter - Black Lives Matter Lecture

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Slayter - Black Lives Matter Lecture

  1. 1. Elspeth Slayter, PhD Associate Professor School of Social Work Salem State University
  2. 2.  What is a teach-in?  A teach-in is when a particular subject is addressed with a large group of people  Traditionally, teach-ins were done in large groups, but this week’s teach-in will take place in different classrooms across the campus  What will unify these classrooms is the fact that we are talking about the #BlackLivesMatter movement
  3. 3.  National activist movement  Led by Black people, supported by allies  Campaigns against multi-systemic physical, psychological, and political violence toward Black people  Use of #BlackLivesMatter refers to a movement that is addressing the ways in which Black people in the United States are deprived of basic human rights and dignity in many instances
  4. 4.  Don’t All Lives Matter?  By saying "All Lives Matter," it implies that all lives are equally at risk – and based on narrative accounts, as well as statistical data we know this is not true!  The statement “Black lives matter” is not an anti-white proposition – we are honoring the experience of Black people  Affirming justice for Black people is part of a global and inclusive justice movement.  The #BLM movement is an ideological and political intervention that is committed to recognizing and speaking out against anti- Black racism and changing systems
  5. 5.  By saying "All Lives Matter," it implies that all lives are equally at risk – and based on narrative accounts, as well as statistical data we know this is not true!  The statement “Black lives matter” is not an anti-white proposition  Affirming justice for Black people is part of a global and inclusive justice movement  #BLM movement is an ideological, political intervention that is committed to recognizing and speaking out against anti-Black racism
  6. 6.  Important to me as a social worker  “Social workers promote social justice and social change with and on behalf of clients”  Honor the #BlackLivesMatter movement through teaching – as an ally  Many social situations and trends impacted development of #BlackLivesMatter  One of those is they way social inequality has resulted in disproportionate representation of Black children in child protection/welfare
  7. 7.  When compared to White children, Black children were:  2.92 times more likely to have reports made to child protective hotlines  3.05 times more likely to have those reports accepted for investigation  4.56 times more likely to be removed from their home Source: http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle- news/disparities-found-in-child-welfare/
  8. 8. Race/ethnicity % of total child population % of children in foster care American Indian/Alaskan Native 1% 2% Asian/Pacific Islander 4% 1% African-American/Black 14% 31% Hispanic/Latino 22% 20% White, Non- Hispanic/Latino 56% 40% U.S. Census Bureau, 2008
  9. 9.  Disparate experiences (Stoltzfus, 2005)  Part of disparity may be attributed to use of kinship care – but does not account for the enormity of the gap  6.29 times more likely to stay out of home for 2+ years African- American/ Black Children White Children Mean length of stay in foster care, 2003 40 months 24 months
  10. 10.  Not new phenomenon!  Slavery - excluded from orphanages /placed in almshouses  1910: National Urban League, need equitable services  Post WWII: Increased “access”  1959: Study on reduced likelihood of adoption  1963: Study on racial bias among child protection workers
  11. 11.  Why do we see disproportionality?  3 National Incidence Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect (NIS) found no relationship between race and the incidence of child maltreatment after controlling for poverty and other risk factors (Sedlak & Broadhurst, 1996)  Incidence of child abuse and neglect was associated with poverty & single parenthood  Socioeconomic status - strongest predictor of maltreatment rates (Sedlak, McPherson, & Das, 2010)
  12. 12.  How can we move forward to address the realities of Black children and families?  Poverty alleviation and community development  Efforts to improve socioeconomic status (SES)  SES = Education, Income, Profession  Jimenez: Suggested policy solutions  Allow subsidies for legal guardians  Foster the use of broad kinship networks  Develop shared custody models vs. TPR
  13. 13.  How can we move forward to address the realities of Black children and families?  Researchers: Move beyond “disproportionality exists”:  Does the magnitude of the gap differ in different localities?  Do places that have high disparity rates share other characteristics?  Are factors such as family structure, unemployment, and parental education levels related in any way to disparity rates?  How should what we learn about where disparity is greatest influence public investments designed to promote greater equity for children and families?
  14. 14.  How can YOU make a difference?  Be aware of how your social identities impact your social work practice  Be an ally – honor the experiences of Black people!  Be aware of the causes of disproportionality!  Work towards small-scale solutions!  Think globally, act locally

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