Aid project in LEDC
A young girl carries water
in this suburb of Bamako.
Until recently people here
depended on water from
traditional wells w...
Girls pulling water
in the early
morning, Madoug
ou village, Dogon
valley
13 year old Marietou collects her family's
water at the village's unprotected well. The
task of collecting water falls to ...
During the dry
season, women have to wait
hours before it is their turn to
fetch water. After waiting they
take bucketfuls...
Most women collect 20 litres of water at a time, carrying
it home on their heads. This weighs 20kg the same as
the UK airp...
WaterAid in Mali
• WaterAid's programme in Mali began in 2000 and it now works with seven partner organisations
providing ...
Goats (Tanzania)
Computers (Kenya)
Computers for Schools Kenya
Computers for Schools Kenya was established as a non-profit organisation to
...
“Students need to learn the details of a
case study of an aid project in an LEDC.
They should be able to comment about
its...
A case study from an LEDC to illustrate
the factors that affect the location of
different types of economic activity.
Case Study 1 – LEDC, Primary
Activity, Copper mining in Zambia
Where are the copper mines?
Copperbelt
region
Image from Google
Earth, what evidence
is there of the mine
here?
What’s it like down a mine?
Hello, I’m Clinton.
Who works in theIn mine?can see
my poster you
that...
Lots of our parents work
down the mine! It has
b...
What's the effect on the environment?
Whats the effect on the economy?
What’s the effect on the society?
The copper is driven to Cape Town or
Dar Es Salaam
Why are the mines where they are?
•
•
•
•
•
•

Raw materials
Water and power supplies
Accessibility of transport and commu...
• http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7920945
.stm
• http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LnNZVjJPJ4
A case study from an MEDC to
illustrate the factors that affect the
location of different types of economic
activity.
Case Study 2 – MEDC, Tertiary
Activity, Cambridge Science Park
A case study of MNC investment in a
specific area in an international
context.
Where is Ethiopia?
What do we know about Ethiopia?
Welega Region
SHOULD ETHIOPIA HAVE FOREIGN
INVESTMENT FOR A NEW MINE?
Task
• Write a report for the Ethiopian government
outlining the likely costs and benefits that may
result from a multi-mi...
A case study of a specific development
where conflicts exist between
economic development and
environmental damage.
292km
Task
• Watch the video (33) on the Aral Sea disaster
• Make notes on
– Causes
– Consequences
– Solutions
The importance of
Remote Sensing

Updated image
now showing
recovery in
Kazakhstan
side due to
the Dam
• The waters of the Aral Sea
appear emerald green and black
in this image, captured by the
MODIS on the Terra satellite on...
Task
Write up your notes as a case study card:
- Context statement = an example of the effect of
economic activities on th...
Aral Sea Disaster: A case study of how
economic activity can lead to environmental
problems
Causes

Location map

Conseque...
Case studies economic activity
Case studies economic activity
Case studies economic activity
Case studies economic activity
Case studies economic activity
Case studies economic activity
Case studies economic activity
Case studies economic activity
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Case studies economic activity

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Case studies economic activity

  1. 1. Aid project in LEDC
  2. 2. A young girl carries water in this suburb of Bamako. Until recently people here depended on water from traditional wells which were drying out.
  3. 3. Girls pulling water in the early morning, Madoug ou village, Dogon valley
  4. 4. 13 year old Marietou collects her family's water at the village's unprotected well. The task of collecting water falls to women and children, especially girls, who help their mother's from an early age.
  5. 5. During the dry season, women have to wait hours before it is their turn to fetch water. After waiting they take bucketfuls of water home. A single trek might take three hours.
  6. 6. Most women collect 20 litres of water at a time, carrying it home on their heads. This weighs 20kg the same as the UK airport luggage allowance.
  7. 7. WaterAid in Mali • WaterAid's programme in Mali began in 2000 and it now works with seven partner organisations providing water, sanitation and hygiene support to communities in five out of Mali's eight regions (Tombouctou, Gao, Mopti, Segou and Koulikoro) and in the capital city, Bamako. • Communities are involved in all stages of these projects, from the planning through to building, maintenance and management. • In urban areas our partners are helping to establish communal tapstands that are linked to the city's main water supplies. Community members pay a small amount to buy their water and this is used to pay for the upkeep of the water point and for the wages of trained community members who manage it. • In rural areas WaterAid's projects focus on helping communities to deepen and protect hand-dug wells and fit them with either handpumps or buckets and windlasses to ensure that the water is not contaminated. Where possible broken handpumps are also mended. • The Malian Government has been extremely supportive of WaterAid's work. Credit: WaterAid / Daniel O'Leary Sanitation schemes include household latrines and school sanitation blocks. • Hygiene education is carried out in a variety of ways - one approach is community soapmaking through which women not only earn money and a new skill but also encourage good hygiene among their communities. The simple act of washing hands with soap and water at key times such as after going to the loo and before eating - can reduce diarrhoeal diseases by over 40%. • Revolving credit schemes have also been introduced to communities and these enable women to buy buckets with lids which prevent water from becoming contaminated on the journey home. • WaterAid aims to target the most vulnerable sections of society in Mali - the poorest and the most marginalised, including women, the elderly, disabled and those living with HIV/AIDS. To assist with this, research into gender was carried out in 2005 and a project has also been developed to work with disabled people. • The vulnerability ranking system, initiated by WaterAid in Nigeria, has also been introduced in Mali to ensure projects are equitable. This system enables communities to decide how much each member pays for water, based on their financial situation, to ensure resources are allocated fairly.
  8. 8. Goats (Tanzania)
  9. 9. Computers (Kenya) Computers for Schools Kenya Computers for Schools Kenya was established as a non-profit organisation to facilitate the productive and sustainable use of computers in education on a national level in Kenya's secondary schools. Since August 2002 Computers for Schools Kenya has installed over 3,000 high-quality, fully refurbished PCs into Kenyan state secondary schools. Computers for Schools Kenya also advises upon and assess the preparedness of each school's infrastructure and provides ongoing timely technical support to recipient schools. Who benefits? The project will ensure an equitable balance of distribution between rural and urban schools, girls and boys institutions and ensure the inclusion of marginalised sectors, and schools for children with disabilities. Over the coming months Computer Aid International (through the generous financial support of a UK trust) will provide 450 professionally refurbished Pentium 4 computers needed for this project.
  10. 10. “Students need to learn the details of a case study of an aid project in an LEDC. They should be able to comment about its sustainability in terms of economic costs, impacts on the environment and effects on people.”
  11. 11. A case study from an LEDC to illustrate the factors that affect the location of different types of economic activity.
  12. 12. Case Study 1 – LEDC, Primary Activity, Copper mining in Zambia
  13. 13. Where are the copper mines? Copperbelt region
  14. 14. Image from Google Earth, what evidence is there of the mine here?
  15. 15. What’s it like down a mine?
  16. 16. Hello, I’m Clinton. Who works in theIn mine?can see my poster you that... Lots of our parents work down the mine! It has brought so much money to our area. My Father is a miner and the money pays for my school fees
  17. 17. What's the effect on the environment?
  18. 18. Whats the effect on the economy?
  19. 19. What’s the effect on the society?
  20. 20. The copper is driven to Cape Town or Dar Es Salaam
  21. 21. Why are the mines where they are? • • • • • • Raw materials Water and power supplies Accessibility of transport and communications Capital Labour Market
  22. 22. • http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7920945 .stm • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LnNZVjJPJ4
  23. 23. A case study from an MEDC to illustrate the factors that affect the location of different types of economic activity.
  24. 24. Case Study 2 – MEDC, Tertiary Activity, Cambridge Science Park
  25. 25. A case study of MNC investment in a specific area in an international context.
  26. 26. Where is Ethiopia?
  27. 27. What do we know about Ethiopia?
  28. 28. Welega Region
  29. 29. SHOULD ETHIOPIA HAVE FOREIGN INVESTMENT FOR A NEW MINE?
  30. 30. Task • Write a report for the Ethiopian government outlining the likely costs and benefits that may result from a multi-million dollar mine in the Welega region.
  31. 31. A case study of a specific development where conflicts exist between economic development and environmental damage.
  32. 32. 292km
  33. 33. Task • Watch the video (33) on the Aral Sea disaster • Make notes on – Causes – Consequences – Solutions
  34. 34. The importance of Remote Sensing Updated image now showing recovery in Kazakhstan side due to the Dam
  35. 35. • The waters of the Aral Sea appear emerald green and black in this image, captured by the MODIS on the Terra satellite on October 5, 2008. The Aral Sea islocated in Kazakhstan (north) and Uzbekistan (south). • The Aral Sea has been shrinking since the 1960s and 70s when the two main rivers that feed it the Amudar'ya and the Syrdar'ya - were diverted to support agricultural endeavors - mainly rice and cotton. As a result of the shrinkage, the Aral sea has been split into the North and South Aral Seas. The South Aral Sea has also been split in two as well. The right side of the South Aral Sea has a great deal of dry lake bed visible, as well as sediment. The two red dots are the locations of active fires.
  36. 36. Task Write up your notes as a case study card: - Context statement = an example of the effect of economic activities on the environment) - Causes - Consequences - Solutions - Location (map) - The importance of Remote Sensing - Key facts
  37. 37. Aral Sea Disaster: A case study of how economic activity can lead to environmental problems Causes Location map Consequences Key facts/what is going on here? The importance of remote sensing Solutions

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