FVCM follow-up webinar: Tony

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Tony D'Amato's responses to FVCM conference questions, delivered during the 4/8/09 webinar. Mark Jacobs' responses to FVCM conference questions, delivered during the 4/8/09 webinar. Much more information on the February 2009 Forest Values and Carbon Markets conference in Cloquet, MN is at http://www.blandinfoundation.org/events/events-detail.php?intResourceID=550.

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  • Much more information on the February 2009 Forest Values and Carbon Markets conference in Cloquet, MN is at http://www.blandinfoundation.org/events/events-detail.php?intResourceID=550.
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FVCM follow-up webinar: Tony

  1. 1. Forest management strategies for increasing carbon stocks and sequestration Anthony D’Amato Dept. of Forest Resources
  2. 2. Outline <ul><li>Review components of carbon cycle related to forest management </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss common recommendations for increasing carbon stocks and sequestration </li></ul><ul><li>Address questions raised at Forest Values and Carbon Markets Conference </li></ul>
  3. 3. Relevant Components of Forest Carbon Cycle <ul><li>Sequestration </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Amount of carbon absorbed by forest vegetation and stored in ecosystem components (living biomass, dead wood, soils) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Need to account for carbon lost to atmosphere through respiration (decomposition of organic matter, plant respiration) </li></ul></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Gross sequestration From: Stavins & Richards (2005) Respiration 0-10 11-30 31-70 71-120 >120 From: Pregitzer & Euskirchen (2004)
  5. 5. Relevant Components of Forest Carbon Cycle <ul><li>Carbon storage </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Amount of carbon accumulated in living and dead biomass, as well as forest soils </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Relevant Components of Forest Carbon Cycle Adapted from: Pregitzer & Euskirchen (2004)
  7. 7. Management recommendations for increased carbon stocks and sequestration <ul><li>Influence sequestration rates </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increase or maintain high-levels of growth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Thinning, fertilization, improved growing stock </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increase stocking levels on understocked stands </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Stock “from below”-underplanting </li></ul></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Management recommendations for increased carbon stocks and sequestration <ul><li>Influence carbon storage </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Extended rotation periods </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Increase total carbon accumulated in forest biomass </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Partial harvesting systems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Minimize respiration rates during regeneration period </li></ul></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Management recommendations for increased carbon stocks and sequestration <ul><li>Influence carbon storage </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increase quality and size of trees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Potential for long-term storage in long-lived wood products </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce respiration rates associated with decomposition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Thin to salvage mortality </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Utilize logging residues </li></ul></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Management recommendations for increased carbon stocks and sequestration <ul><li>Balancing sequestration and storage </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increasing growth rates versus storage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Wood products from short versus longer rotations </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Emissions associated with intermediate treatments and product lifecycles </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Questions raised at Forest Values and Carbon Markets Conference <ul><li>In context of changing climate, does it make sense to manage for historic forest composition? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use as guide for range of species and structures currently adapted to site </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Provide opportunity for reassembly and adaptation to new climate regimes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Guide for prioritizing carbon management strategies </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>E.g., Species and sites currently suitable for underplanting </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Questions raised at Forest Values and Carbon Markets Conference <ul><li>Is managing for carbon storage and sequestration compatible with biodiversity conservation? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What’s best for sequestration and storage, may not be best for biodiversity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Hybrid poplar on short rotations vs. old-growth mixed species stands </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Strategies for both can be integrated at stand and landscape-scales </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Retention of green trees, biological legacies (large dead wood) within plantations; reserve areas for sake of biodiversity conservation; varied rotation lengths at landscape-level; mixed species management </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Questions raised at Forest Values and Carbon Markets Conference <ul><li>Within the context of climate change, what three things should be kept in mind when writing a stand-level prescription? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What are the overriding objectives? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>E.g., produce fiber based on aspen coppice </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How can these objectives be met while also incorporating climate mitigation (carbon storage) strategies? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>E.g., retention of scattered leave trees, use of intermediate treatments </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How can these objectives be met while providing for adaptation/resiliency? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>E.g., promotion of mixed species </li></ul></ul></ul>

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