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( please  recycle!) PAPER White office paper Magazines and books  (as  long as nothing is laminated) Newspaper Cardboard  ...
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Recycling infographic

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A little poster I put together for our office to help remind people what can and what cannot be recycled. We printed these out in colour, laminated them and stuck them up in the kitchen and around the printers.

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Recycling infographic

  1. 1. ( please recycle!) PAPER White office paper Magazines and books (as long as nothing is laminated) Newspaper Cardboard (boxes and cereal boxes) Tetrapak (such as milk and fruit juice cartons - supposed to be recycled by specialist facotires but most end up on landfills anyway) PLASTICS All sorts The easiest way to determine whether a plastic product is recyclable is by looking for its recycling logo. There are seven plastic recycling logos and most plastic packaging is imprinted with one of them. The logos tell you what type of plastic a container is made of. Each type has to be recycled separately METAL Colddrink and beer cans Food tins Metal lids of glass jars Aluminium foil and foil packaging Paint tins and aerosol cans (leave labels on them so recyclers can see whether they contain hazardous material) GLASS Beverage bottles Food jars such as tomato sauce (ketchup), jam and mayonnaise bottles Drinking glasses OTHER Batteries (separate container, specialist recycling required) Light bulbs (separate container, specialist recycling required) Carbon paper Printer paper packaging (I know, ironic, right?!!) Laminated or waxy paper Punch confetti Stickers Cling wrap Ceramics (plates) RECYCLABLE NOT RECYCLABLE Pyrex

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