MFA-Shannon

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MFA-Shannon

  1. 1. Shannon Schlotman, MS, OTR/L Clinical Supervisor School Options (858) 268-8585 [email_address] © Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing
  2. 2. Learning is not all in your head <ul><li>Children learn through movement </li></ul><ul><li>Exploration through movement develops the nervous system </li></ul><ul><li>Movement lays a foundation for learning </li></ul><ul><li>Movement stimulates the senses </li></ul><ul><li>Movement feels good! </li></ul><ul><li>© Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing </li></ul>
  3. 3. Our brain is plastic <ul><li>Our brain can adapt to an infinite number of situations and develop unique skills </li></ul><ul><li>Our brain can also re-learn and adapt after it has been damaged </li></ul><ul><li>Importance of motivation </li></ul><ul><li>© Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing </li></ul>
  4. 4. Building a learning foundation <ul><li>Complex networks of neurons develop as a result of sensory stimulation and movement experience </li></ul><ul><li>Learning, thought, creativity, and intelligence are processes of the whole body </li></ul><ul><li>Higher level skills (attention, organization, academics, social skills, etc) rely on adequate sensory processing </li></ul><ul><li>Sensory and movement experiences support language development </li></ul><ul><li>© Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing </li></ul>
  5. 5. Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) <ul><li>Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) is a complex disorder of the brain. People with SPD misinterpret everyday sensory information, such as touch, sound, and movement. This can lead to behavioral problems, difficulties with coordination, learning challenges, and many other issues. </li></ul><ul><li>© Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing </li></ul>
  6. 6. Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) <ul><li>Sensory processing allows us to correctly interpret sensations and organize a timely response to internal and external demands </li></ul><ul><li>Sensory processing is commonly compromised in developmental and learning disorders </li></ul><ul><li>© Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing </li></ul>
  7. 7. Sensations and behavior <ul><li>Sensations can change our brain chemistry </li></ul><ul><li>Sensations can be calming or alerting </li></ul><ul><li>Like – dislike – don’t care </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid or approach </li></ul><ul><li>Role of motivation in the learning process </li></ul><ul><li>© Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing </li></ul>
  8. 8. Educational implications <ul><li>Can we use sensations to our advantage to modify behavior and improve learning? </li></ul><ul><li>© Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing </li></ul>
  9. 9. Occupational Therapy <ul><li>Occupational Therapy (OT) is a regulated health science profession rooted in the understanding and analysis of human occupations and in the use of carefully designed therapeutic activities . </li></ul><ul><li>© Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing </li></ul>
  10. 10. Occupational Therapy <ul><li>Occupational Therapy can help children build a strong foundation for learning , especially in the areas of attention, organization, behavior regulation, play skills, self care, and motor development. </li></ul><ul><li>© Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>© Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing When to make an OT referral? </li></ul>Dislike of/difficulty with group situations   Self-stimulation and/or self-injury   Poor play skills   Overly/under sensitive to specific sensations (touch, smells, sounds, movement, sights, foods, etc)   Physical clumsiness; difficulty with sports   Difficulty to unwind or calm self    Lack of independence with age level tasks Difficulty with fine motor tasks Difficulty with handwriting Unusually high/low activity level   Impulsivity; distractibility   Resistance to novel situations   Frequent whining and complaining   Difficulty with transitions   Easily frustrated; tantrums   Disorganization Difficulty carrying through multi step tasks   Overly shy Poor organization with space and time
  12. 12. Role of OT evaluation <ul><li>Assess specific problems </li></ul><ul><li>Identify reasons of behaviors and difficulties </li></ul><ul><li>Provide direction to the entire team </li></ul><ul><li>Set up treatment plan </li></ul><ul><li>Provide family with road map for future services </li></ul><ul><li>Allow family to advocate for child’s needs </li></ul><ul><li>© Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing </li></ul>
  13. 13. Therapy vs. Consultation <ul><li>Therapy: permanent gains; focus on building long lasting foundation skills; elimination or reduction of problems </li></ul><ul><li>Consultation: temporary improvement in attention, behavior regulation, and motivation; minimize impact of difficulties, and maximize opportunities for successful performance </li></ul><ul><li>One size does not fit all! </li></ul><ul><li>© Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing </li></ul>
  14. 14. Building a strong foundation for learning <ul><li>Sensory modulation </li></ul><ul><li>Postural skills </li></ul><ul><li>Praxis skills </li></ul><ul><li>© Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing </li></ul>
  15. 15. Building a strong foundation for learning <ul><li>Sensory Modulation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ability to focus attention and to regulate arousal in order to maintain an alert but relaxed state throughout the day </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Also responsible for regulation of autonomic functions such as sleep/wake cycles, digestion, elimination, breathing, etc </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ability to turn sensory messages into controlled behaviors that match the nature and intensity of the sensory message </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: distractibility, difficulty transitioning and accepting changes, too revved up, over reactive to certain situations, frequent tantrums, noisy, always moving, etc </li></ul></ul><ul><li>© Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing </li></ul>
  16. 16. Building a strong foundation for learning <ul><li>Postural skills </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Essential for development of motor, visual , and language skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Essential for developing proper regulation of attention and activity levels </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples of poor postural skills: poor posture while sitting, not facing task or sitting too far away from tasks, poor balance, restless while sitting, getting out of breath easily, fatiguing easily, etc </li></ul></ul><ul><li>© Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing </li></ul>
  17. 17. Building a strong foundation for learning <ul><li>Praxis skills </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ability to organize appropriate movements in response to demands </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Essential for successful interaction with our environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: poor motor planning, difficulty with bilateral movements, clumsy movements, bumping into things, poor sequencing, poor visual and fine motor skills, lacking confidence, difficulty following directions, etc </li></ul></ul><ul><li>© Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing </li></ul>
  18. 18. Getting started <ul><li>Observe your child’s behavior and learn from it: behavior speaks! </li></ul><ul><li>Look for activities that promote a calm but alert state </li></ul><ul><li>Promote a movement rich environment </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage activities that involve the entire body, especially the core muscles; encourage sustained physical activity as opposed to short bursts of activity </li></ul><ul><li>Find ways to incorporate movement and sensory input into cognitive tasks; if not possible, encourage movement breaks </li></ul><ul><li>© Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing </li></ul>
  19. 19. Getting started <ul><li>Look for activities that provide the “just right challenge”; if placing demands on the child that are unrealistic, the child will become disorganized, frustrated, and not succeed </li></ul><ul><li>Use activities that tap the child’s inner drive; if the child thinks the activity is fun, he/she will be more engaged and learn faster </li></ul><ul><li>Allow the child to find a successful role in the whole classroom and family by participating in structured activities </li></ul><ul><li>Seek consultation from a qualified occupational therapist </li></ul><ul><li>© Chris Vinceneux, 2009 – Written permission from author required before distributing or reproducing </li></ul>

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