Erin C. Markus
EDTECH 503 (Fall 2009)
Instructional Design Project #2
Submitted to: Dr. Ross Perkins
December 8, 2009
Proj...
Markus| 2
Table of Contents
Reflection Paper 3
Part 1: Topic -
Part 1a: Goal 5
Part 1b: Audience 5
Part 1c: Rationale 5
Pa...
Markus| 3
Synthesis Reflection Paper
If I were to describe instructional design metaphorically, I would compare it to the
...
Markus| 4
At the beginning of the semester, we were asked how instructional design relates
to Educational Technology. At t...
Markus| 5
Part 1: Topic
Part 1a: Instructional Goal
The student-athlete will apply nutritional value to their daily routin...
Markus| 6
components of attitude learning, as stated in Smith and Ragan (2005), there are three
components to attitude lea...
Markus| 7
Part 2: Analysis Report
Part 2a: Description of the Learning Context
In the following sub-sections, the learning...
Markus| 8
habits among these outside influences, for example, bringing a lunch from home or
choosing a healthy lunch in th...
Markus| 9
Figure 1 Figure 2
Figure 3 Figure 4
195
140
Estimated Male vs.
Female Student-
Athletes SY 09-10
Male
Female
0
2...
Markus| 10
Part 3: Planning
Part 3a: Learning Objectives
1.0 The student-athlete will state the benefits of nutrition in a...
Markus| 11
Part 3b: Matrix of Objectives, Bloom’s Taxonomy, and Types of Learning
Table 1
Objective
Number
Bloom’s Taxonom...
Markus| 12
Part 3c: ARCS Motivational Table
Keller’s (1987) ARCS model, which focuses on Attention, Relevance, Confidence,...
Markus| 13
CONFIDENCE
C1. Learning requirements
The student-athletes will be expected to complete the online course and ap...
Markus| 14
Part 4: Instructor Guide
The Nutrition for Athletics course is a mandatory course designed for student-athletes...
Markus| 15
computer access at all, then they can print out the log at school or create their own to
use and turn it in dir...
Markus| 16
can be re-taken as many times as necessary, all students who signed in should have a
“P” next to their name. Th...
Markus| 17
Part 5: Learner Context
Part 5a: Learning Materials
The primary learning materials for this course will be the ...
Markus| 18
for full course credit. The grading rubric for the assessment of the course is located in
Appendix B.
Part 5c: ...
Markus| 19
Part 6: Formative Evaluation Plan
Part 6a: Expert Review
SME Name: Beth Christiansen
Reason for Choosing SME: B...
Markus| 20
Part 6c: Small Group Evaluation
According to Smith and Ragan (2005), small-group evaluation is used to check th...
Markus| 21
Part 7: Formative Evaluation Report
Part 7a: Evaluation Survey
The survey shown in Table 3 was sent to Beth Chr...
Markus| 22
may get confused by the term “nutrient transport” on the
hydration slide. You may not need to include the state...
Markus| 23
missed thatcould be crucial to
the course?
long or technical. You are to the point and keep it simple
and easy ...
Markus| 24
Part 7c: Comments on Change
I really appreciated the information that was received by my SME, Beth Christiansen...
Markus| 25
Part 8: AECT Standards Grid
Professional Standards Addressed (AECT)
The following standards, developed by the A...
Markus| 26
4.4 Information Management
Standard 5: EVALUATION
5.1 Problem Analysis X
5.2 Criterion-Referenced
Measurement
X...
Markus| 27
11. Build an instructional design product that integrates major aspects of the
systematic process and make this...
Markus| 28
AECT STANDARDS (Applicable to EDTECH 503)
1.0 Design
1.1 Instructional Systems Design
1.1.a Utilize and impleme...
Markus| 29
1.3 Instructional Strategies
1.3.a Select instructional strategies appropriate for a variety of learner
charact...
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2.3 Computer-Based Technologies
2.3.2 Design, produce, and use digital information with computer-based
technolo...
Markus| 31
Appendix A
Nutrition Log Template
Sample:
Monday Two Eggs
Toast
Orange Juice
Ham Sandwich
Apple
Graham
Crackers...
Markus| 32
Appendix B
Grading Rubric
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Day (Week 2)
Breakfast Lunch Dinner Snacks
Monday
Tue...
Markus| 33
Grading Rubric for
Student-Athlete Nutrition
Course
Pass Fail
Online course completion The athlete attended the...
Markus| 34
Lab Check-in and E-Mail Collection Sheet Template
Student Name
(please print clearly)
Sport E-Mail Address
(ple...
Markus| 35
Computer Lab Instruction Cards Template
Computer Lab Instructions
1. Find an empty computer
station
2. Go to In...
Markus| 36
SME Evaluation Instrument
SME Name Beth Christiansen
Project
Topic
Nutrition for Student-Athletes
Area 1.0 Pres...
Markus| 37
Smith, P. L., & Ragan, T. J. (2005). Instructional Design, Third Edition. Hoboken, NJ:
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
...
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Markus id project 2

  1. 1. Erin C. Markus EDTECH 503 (Fall 2009) Instructional Design Project #2 Submitted to: Dr. Ross Perkins December 8, 2009 Project Title: Nutrition for Sports & Recovery for Student-Athletes
  2. 2. Markus| 2 Table of Contents Reflection Paper 3 Part 1: Topic - Part 1a: Goal 5 Part 1b: Audience 5 Part 1c: Rationale 5 Part 2: Analysis Report - Part 2a.1: Learning Context 7 Part 2a.2: Transfer Context 7 Part 2b: Description of the Learners 8 Part 3: Planning - Part 3a: List of Learning Objectives 10 Part 3b: Objectives Matrix Table 11 Part 3c: ARCS Table 12 Part 4: Instructor Guide - Part 4a: Course Materials 14 Part 4b: Computer Requirements 14 Part 4c: Duration of the course 15 Part 4d: Instructions for the facilitator 15 Part 4e: Flowchart for Course 16 Part 5: Learning Materials - Part 5a: Learning materials 17 Part 5b: Formative and/or Summative assessment materials 17 Part 5c: Technology tool rationale. 18 Part 6: Formative Evaluation Plan - Part 6a: Expert Review 19 Part 6b: One-to-one evaluation 19 Part 6c: Small group evaluation 20 Part 6d: Field trial 20 Part 7: Formative Evaluation Report - Part 7a: Evaluation survey or rubric 21 Part 7b: Report of expert review 21 Part 7c: Comments on suggested changes 24 Part 8: AECT Standards Grid 25 Appendix 31 References 36
  3. 3. Markus| 3 Synthesis Reflection Paper If I were to describe instructional design metaphorically, I would compare it to the human body. The human body is a complex system of organs and organ systems that all interact with each other in some way. This can be compared to the way that teachers and students are their own beings, or systems, and they have a need to interact with each other for successful learning. The design process, like the human body, is dependent on all of its organs functioning together to reach a desired outcome…life and the ability to sustain it. Without all the aspects of design being successful, the lesson would be lifeless or non-sustainable. In recognizing the interconnectedness and interdependencies of the parts and systems within the human body and instructional design, one might be reminded of a doctor as the designer of preventative medicine. A doctor needs to fully understand the inner workings of the human body in order to diagnose a problem and present a solution for the patient. The designer, as the doctor, has the ability to see the details of a learning need and develop and implement the final proposed educational lesson or tool, thus meeting the needs of the patient. Indeed, my background in human physiology has led me to embrace this approach to instructional design because I recognize that systematic design provides enough rigidity for structure and support while maintaining flexibility to grow or improve through evaluative and preventative measures, much like the bone and muscle structures of the body. From the moment a need is recognized and analyzed by the designer, or doctor, the process to create a solution to the problem begins. Like a doctor would consider certain factors to a problem, such as medial history, medications taken, environmental influence, and family genetics, there are many complex factors to be considered in instructional design, including learners, context/environment, goals, objectives, tasks, feedback, evaluation, and assessment. A doctor and a designer would approach the determined problem in a step-by-step method, giving special attention to the details of each factor and finally coming to a conclusion or diagnosis of the problem and begin the process of solving, or healing the problem. I have come to realize through this course that we all too often focus on the big picture of instructional design and the learning tool itself, and not the details that are involved that includes focusing on the learners and not the instruction itself. Although I have had little experience with designing goals, objectives, activities and learner assessments in the past, one area I was very interested in learning about, and which I now see as being very important for the entire design process, is the focus that is given to detail before the designing even begins, which is the needs assessment, front‐end analysis, and other preparation that can mean the difference between looking at the brain and seeing a big blob of flesh that has no organized purpose or knowing that each lobe has a purpose and can be easily altered with only the slightest touch. So much of this makes sense now, and I plan on incorporating some of the learner and context analysis techniques learned in this course to guide future design and instruction in my career.
  4. 4. Markus| 4 At the beginning of the semester, we were asked how instructional design relates to Educational Technology. At the time, it was quite difficult for me to describe this relation. They are not separate entities, but Instructional Design is a part of Educational Technology, and Educational Technology would not exist without Instructional Design. I found it so easy to think of Educational Technology as a “tool” for education and not as a systematic process that always keeps the learner in mind. I can definitely say now that my eyes have been opened to the world of design and what it takes to create meaningful instruction using known factors and accommodating for the unknown as well. I have already caught myself looking at projects for other classes and presentations and thinking about whether the lesson would be considered a “supplantive”, teacher-led , or “generative”, or more thought provoking and learner driven lesson. I enjoyed learning about the different instructional strategies in chapters 8-15 of Smith and Ragan. It was nice to see the definitions of these strategies and how they apply to instructional design. I feel I can apply this newly acquired knowledge to my future in education, either as a teacher or as a designer.
  5. 5. Markus| 5 Part 1: Topic Part 1a: Instructional Goal The student-athlete will apply nutritional value to their daily routine before, during and after athletics, as well as maintain a nutrition log. The student-athlete will also know how to recognize and prevent dehydration while participating in sports. Part 1b: Audience The course is to be taken by all incoming student-athletes, grades 9-12, for the upcoming sports season, unless taken during that same school year. Part 1c: Rationale I chose this topic because, as a coach, I feel this training should be a part of every student-athletes’ season. When playing sports, good nutrition can enhance performance, both on and off the court or field. Nutrition is important for everybody’s health, but as an athlete there are special measures that need to be taken when making nutritional choices before, during, and after sporting events. This class will be offered at the beginning of each sports season and must be attended by all student-athletes that will be playing a sport that season, even if the class was taken the previous year. If the student-athlete has taken the class during the same school year, they do not have to take the class that year. Meeting the nutritional needs of high-school athletes is the primary focus of this course. My course is a blend of both supplantive and generative, because of the way it is delivered and assessed. The course is taken entirely online and is lead by the instructor in the presentation. A facilitator from the school will be guiding the students through taking the online course and will collect the assessment materials at the end of the course. Generatively, the course will culminate with a nutritional log being kept by the student-athlete. The student will have to decide, on their own, which foods they will choose to benefit their nutritional health and then keep track of these foods for two weeks. They will have the knowledge to do so after completing the online course. The approximate percentage of supplantive lesson is 80%, and the rest being generative, due to the nutrition log assessment. This course would fall under the instructional strategy of attitude learning. According to Smith and Ragan (2005), learning within the affective domain is learning that has to do with attitude formation or change. Nutritional habits, whether for day-to-day health or specifically for athletic competition does require adjusting your attitude towards this matter in order for successful results. If a person cannot change their attitude towards eating healthier, then they are going to have great difficulties doing so. In looking at the
  6. 6. Markus| 6 components of attitude learning, as stated in Smith and Ragan (2005), there are three components to attitude learning. The first component is the cognitive component. In this component, this is where you learn “how” to change your attitude towards the topic, such as nutrition. This course will show the skills necessary to make smart nutritional choices. The next component is the behavioral component, which is applying the attitude or changing the behavior to adapt to the new situation, which is this case, would be choosing healthy foods and eating wisely. The assessment of this course that requires a nutrition log will show that the behavior has been modified for the period of time it requires, with the hopes of it continuing. The final component is the affective component, knowing why the attitude or behavior needs to be adjusted and the benefits these changes will bring about. In this course, the students will be able to see why nutrition is important when they see a difference in their performance as a result.
  7. 7. Markus| 7 Part 2: Analysis Report Part 2a: Description of the Learning Context In the following sub-sections, the learning context will be described in detail in section 2a.1. The learning environment will be addressed, as well as its features and tools that shall be utilized for the course. The transfer context will be described in section 2a.2, which will focus more on where the student will be using, or applying the knowledge they acquired from the course. Part 2a.1: Learning Context The student-athletes will be required to use the computer laboratory at the high-school to view the online course. The reason the high-school computer lab will be used is so that the students can sign their name on the attendance list to show they were there in order to get part of their course credit completed. The computer lab is a familiar environment to the students, since they use the lab for many classes during their school years. The computer lab offers minimal distractions, unlike the home environment. This is important to maintain focus on the course with minimal interruptions. According to the Needs Assessment, about 85% of the student-athletes have used a computer lab before and about 70% are able to navigate through the process of opening the course and following prompts through the presentation until the culmination of the online course, as many of the athletes have completed the required computer course that utilizes slide show presentations. Since the computer lab at the school has a lab monitor, the students that are having difficulty accessing the course will be able to ask for assistance when needed. Part 2a.2: Transfer context The student-athletes will be utilizing their new knowledge in a real-world setting during their nutrition log completion. This part of the course will last approximately two weeks, in which the student will use the information they learned in the online course and apply this knowledge to making wise nutritional choices and maintaining a nutrition log that will document their choices. Most of the student-athletes will be accomplishing this task during the first few weeks of their sport season, so they will have a good chance of witnessing immediate outcomes due to healthier eating while performing. At the end of the two week nutrition log, the student will turn in their log to their facilitator via e-mail or hand delivery. The hope is that the student will have enough knowledge of nutritional choices by this point that they will be able to continue their healthy eating habits throughout their sport season and beyond. The student-athlete will be immersed in daily situations where it may be difficult to choose proper foods, especially during the school day, where unhealthy snacks and quick lunches are commonplace. The student-athlete will need to work hard to find resources to maintain their healthy eating
  8. 8. Markus| 8 habits among these outside influences, for example, bringing a lunch from home or choosing a healthy lunch in the cafeteria or local restaurant, maintaining proper hydration throughout the day by utilizing drinking fountains or carrying water bottles, and remembering to eat good recovery foods after workouts. This course will give them the fundamental knowledge to accomplish this. Part 2b: Description of the Learners According to the United Dairymen of Idaho, 30% of adolescent athletes skip breakfast and less than 70% of kids between the ages of 12 and 19 eat breakfast. 25% skip lunch. These are scary statistics. The students that will be taking this course definitely fall into this category, being between the ages of 14 and 19, primarily. The student- athletes that will be completing this course all attend grades 9-12, are both male and female, and all play at least one sport during the school year. Since the course it offered online, the students will be utilizing the school computer lab for the course completion. The majority of the students have used the computer lab for classes in during their school years, with the exception of some 9th graders, who are new to the high school. At this particular school, all 9th graders are required to take a mandatory general computer class, Intro to Computer Learning, where they learn how to perform basic computer function, as well as access programs for instruction that they will use throughout their high-school years (see Figure 2). With the exception of the fall or winter athletes, some of the 9th graders may not have had this course yet, so they will need to utilize the computer lab monitor, course facilitator, or another student to assist them with opening the online course. There may be a few transfer students that are new to the school that have not yet taken the course to obtain this knowledge, so they will need to ask for assistance as well. According to the Needs Assessment given prior to this course, the estimated number of student athletes for the 2009-2010 school year totals approximately 350 (see Figure 4). The total estimated population of the school for the 2009-2010 school year is about 940 students, with over one-third of them estimated to be student-athletes (see Figure 3). The demographic information for the school is shown in the graphics below. The school is located in a military community, with a moderate percentage of low-income families and migrant workers. The population of the school changes each year due to these factors. Graphs on the next page show some the results of the Needs Assessment, which was completed during the spring of 2009 by school administration.
  9. 9. Markus| 9 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 195 140 Estimated Male vs. Female Student- Athletes SY 09-10 Male Female 0 234 217 170 Intro to Computer Learning Completion as of Spring 2009 Incoming 9th Incoming 10th Incoming 11th Incoming 12th 267 259 235 182 Estimated School Population for SY 09-10 9th Grade 10th Grade 11th Grade 120 90 125 Estimated Student- Athletes by Season SY 09-10 Fall Winter Spring
  10. 10. Markus| 10 Part 3: Planning Part 3a: Learning Objectives 1.0 The student-athlete will state the benefits of nutrition in athletics. 1.1 The student-athlete will be able to cite how nutrition can benefit performance and attitude. 1.2 The student will examine the statistics about skipping meals for their age group. 2.0 The student-athlete will be able to demonstrate smart menu decisions in their daily lives. 2.1 The student-athlete will be shown lists of healthy food choices and be able to use those lists to make informed food choices. 3.0 The student-athlete will know how to recognize and prevent dehydration. 3.1 The student-athlete will be able to define dehydration. 3.2 The student-athlete will be able to identify the signs and symptoms of dehydration. 3.3 The student-athlete will know how to prevent dehydration from occurring. 3.4 The student-athlete will determine when and how to hydrate for athletic performance. 4.0 The student-athlete will be able to implement recovery nutrition after athletics. 4.1 The student-athlete will be able to define recovery nutrition. 4.2 The student-athlete will be able to make informed recovery nutritional choices based on information learned in the course. 4.3 The student-athlete will be able to state the timeframe for post-activity recovery nutrition in order to best benefit the body’s recovery. 5.0 The student-athlete will be able to demonstrate smart game-day nutritional choices. 5.1 The student-athlete will incorporate foods into their diet that are beneficial for game day nutrition. 5.2 The student-athlete will be able identify what foods can be performance inhibiting. 6.0 The student-athlete will implement a daily nutritional log. 6.1 The student-athlete will record daily nutritional intakes on a nutrition log form. 6.2 The student-athlete will compile a daily nutritional log for a minimum of two- weeks after the course is complete. 6.3 The student-athlete will analyze the results of the nutrition log and interpret the results and make nutritional adjustments as necessary.
  11. 11. Markus| 11 Part 3b: Matrix of Objectives, Bloom’s Taxonomy, and Types of Learning Table 1 Objective Number Bloom’s Taxonomy Classification Strategy to be employed to teach the objective Type of Learning 1.0 Knowledge Supplantive Declarative 1.1 Comprehend Supplantive Declarative 1.2 Examine Supplantive Declarative 2.0 Apply Generative Attitude 2.1 Apply Generative Attitude 3.0 Analyze Supplantive Principle 3.1 Knowledge Supplantive Declarative 3.2 Knowledge Supplantive Declarative 3.3 Comprehend Supplantive Conceptual 3.4 Apply Generative Principle 4.0 Apply Generative Principle 4.1 Knowledge Supplantive Declarative 4.2 Apply Generative Attitude 4.3 Comprehend Supplantive Conceptual 5.0 Apply Generative Attitude 5.1 Synthesize Generative Attitude 5.2 Knowledge Supplantive Declarative 6.0 Apply Generative Attitude 6.1 Comprehend Supplantive Learning Procedures 6.2 Synthesize Supplantive Attitude 6.3 Analyze/Comprehend Supplantive Principle
  12. 12. Markus| 12 Part 3c: ARCS Motivational Table Keller’s (1987) ARCS model, which focuses on Attention, Relevance, Confidence, and Satisfaction, will be used for planning and incorporating motivational strategies. Project Goal Statement: The student-athlete will apply nutritional value to their daily routine before, during and after athletics, as well as maintain a nutrition log. The student-athlete will also know how to recognize and prevent dehydration while participating in sports. Table 2 ATTENTION A.1 Perceptual Arousal Present students with a real-world activity that they can apply to their everyday lives. This will be accomplished in the form of an online course and culminating real-world activity. The course presentation will include graphics and example items that the students will be familiar with. A2. Inquiry Arousal Present examples and questions about the learning goal and activity that the students will understand and recognize. Address how the activity can benefit their athletic and personal lives. The student will use their basic knowledge of nutrition to analyze their own nutritional needs and generate questions about their own nutritional intake. A3. Variability The course will be delivered online and utilize both declarative knowledge and kinesthetic experience learning for the online portion and the culminating nutrition log activity. RELEVANCE R1. Goal orientation To keep the students focused on the goal, the course will emphasize the importance of proper nutrition during athletics, and give the student an opportunity to experience making choices in their eating habits by using a nutrition log activity. R2. Motive matching The content will be adapted to fit the student’s past experiences and prior knowledge of nutrition and athletics by including examples of foods they are familiar with and signs and symptoms of dehydration that they need to be familiar with, or may have experienced before. R3. Familiarity The student-athletes will be presented with concepts and nutritional foundations that they are familiar with, such as healthy snack examples. Because the students are all athletes, the presentation will be targeted for athletes and their nutritional needs. They will be able to internalize their new knowledge by completing a two-week nutrition log activity and see the results in their performance.
  13. 13. Markus| 13 CONFIDENCE C1. Learning requirements The student-athletes will be expected to complete the online course and apply their newly acquired knowledge to their daily eating habits while performing in athletic events by compiling a nutrition log of their daily intake. C2. Success opportunities The student-athletes will be able to gauge their own success in their attained knowledge by witnessing their performance improvements and general healthiness during the two- week nutrition log and beyond. C3. Personal control The students will have the knowledge to continue their healthy eating habits to benefit their athletic performance and their everyday nutritional lives. SATISFACTION S1. Natural consequences The student-athletes will be participating in a real-world activity, so they will experience the consequences of not using their nutritional knowledge in the desired manner. This will appear as a decline in performance and possible dehydration issues. S2. Positive consequences The student-athlete will see improved performance due to a healthy diet and their risk of dehydration during sports will decline if their new knowledge is applied correctly to their everyday lives. S3. Equity The student-athlete will experience success and will hopefully wish to continue with their healthy eating habits throughout their lives. The positive results will be shown during their two-week nutrition log activity. The improvement in their performance will hopefully help them to see the benefits of this course and they will continue to be successful in their nutritional habits. Keller, J. M. (1987). The systematic process of motivational design. Performance & Instruction, 26 (9/10), 1-8.
  14. 14. Markus| 14 Part 4: Instructor Guide The Nutrition for Athletics course is a mandatory course designed for student-athletes in grades 9-12 that will be competing in the high-school sports programs during the 2009- 2010 school year. The course will present students with a real-world activity that they can apply to their everyday lives, but particularly their athletic lives. This will be accomplished in the form of an online course and culminating real-world activity. The course presentation will include graphics and example items that the students will be familiar with. The course will address how the activity can benefit their athletic and personal lives. The student will use their basic knowledge of nutrition to analyze their own nutritional needs and generate questions about their own nutritional intake. The course is designed to activate the student-athletes prior knowledge on nutritional choices by giving examples of familiar foods that they can use to benefit their performance on and off the playing court or field. Examples of foods will be shown and the course will talk about when and how to utilize these foods to benefit their performance. The student-athlete will also learn to recognize the signs and symptoms of dehydration and how it can be prevented. Part 4a: Course Materials For this course, the facilitator will be receiving an e-mail or disk with the following information necessary for the course facilitation:  Adobe Breeze Presentation Link for use in computer lab, if applicable o URL for Breeze Presentation: http://edtech.na5.acrobat.com/markusfit/ o Username: Therese519@gmail.com o Password: edtech  Nutrition Log Word Document (Appendix A)  Nutrition Course Rubric Word Document (Appendix B)  Computer Lab sign-in, e-mail address, and grade recording sheet (Appendix C)  Nutrition Course Log-in directions card (Appendix D) Part 4b: Computer Requirements For this course, the facilitator will need to ensure that a school computer lab is available for student-athletes to access the Internet. If this is not possible, or the labs are unavailable, the course can be e-mailed to student-athletes, but accountability will be increasingly difficult. Students will need to have e-mail access to receive the nutrition log from the facilitator. This can be home, school, or family/friends e-mail. If the student does not have
  15. 15. Markus| 15 computer access at all, then they can print out the log at school or create their own to use and turn it in directly to the facilitator or coach. Part 4c: Duration of the Course Online Course: The online course will be available for student use for one week, at the beginning of each sport season. All student-athletes must use the computer lab to take the course, unless they have taken it in a previous season of the same school year. The online portion of the course should take approximately 20 minutes to complete. Nutrition Log: The nutrition log will be e-mailed to the student the day after the online course is complete. At this time, the student can begin their two week nutrition log, recording all foods they consume daily. The student should spend at least 20 minutes per day recording information on their nutrition log. The student will submit his/her completed nutrition log to the facilitator or coach for full course credit, via e-mail or hand-delivery. Part 4d: Instructions for Facilitator After the facilitator has received the materials required, they will need to locate a computer lab for the student-athletes to use for the online segment of the course. The facilitator will need to place a sign-in paper in the lab for student-athletes to sign their name for online course attendance credit. The student will also need to provide their e- mail address for the nutrition log to be sent to them by the facilitator. If the student does not have an e-mail, the facilitator can make other arrangements with the student to get a copy of the nutrition log, or they can make their own and turn it in by hand. The student will then receive the course URL on a card from the lab monitor or facilitator to go to the course presentation. The Username and Password will be listed on the card that will be returned as soon as the student is finished with the online course. The student-athletes will visit the lab on their own time, or a team can come in together during a scheduled practice time, and sign-in and obtain the directions card. Once the student is signed onto the site, they can follow the on-screen course directions and proceed through the course. The course should take approximately 20 minutes to complete, including the quiz portion. The student must complete an 80% or more on the quiz to continue to the next phase of the course, which is the nutrition log. If they do not score 80% or more, then they can go through the online course again and re-take the quiz until a sufficient grade is achieved. Once the passing grade is achieved, the student will log-off the computer and turn-in the card to the lab monitor or facilitator, who will record their passing grade confirmation on the sign-in sheet, by marking a “P” next to their name. Since the quiz
  16. 16. Markus| 16 can be re-taken as many times as necessary, all students who signed in should have a “P” next to their name. This will just show that they did complete the course for credit. The facilitator will collect the attendance sheet at the end of each day and record the students that attended the training. The facilitator will then e-mail the nutrition log to the students that gave an e-mail address. The students will keep this log on their own computer for use during the two-week nutrition log portion of the course. The student should spend at least 20 minutes per day recording food choices on their log sheet. When the two-week nutrition log is complete, the student will turn the nutrition log in to the facilitator via e-mail or they may hand-deliver their log to their coach. E-mail to the facilitator is the preferred method, but if the log is hand written, then it may be turned in by hand. 4e: Flowchart for student-athlete online course: Athletes go to computer lab for online course Athletes sign-in at computer lab and obtain instruction card for the course presentation (see Appendix) Follow on-screen directions to complete online course and quiz When finished, report score to lab monitor or facilitator for recording Receive e-mail, if applicable, from facilitator with Nutrition Log attachment. Save to your computer for use. Spend two-weeks recording nutritional intake on Nutrition Log sheet E-mail or turn-in completed Nutrition Log to course facilitator or coach for course credit
  17. 17. Markus| 17 Part 5: Learner Context Part 5a: Learning Materials The primary learning materials for this course will be the online slide presentation course and the two-week nutrition log. The slide presentation will consist of mostly declarative knowledge information, but will also apply to concept learning and attitude learning, as healthy eating is a way of life. The slide presentation is very easy to follow and takes the student-athlete through a simple lesson about proper nutrition while performing during an athletic season. The online course slide outline can be viewed in the appendix section of this project. The online course was created by the course designer using information from a couple of outside sources. The information obtained for the slide presentation was primarily from the United States Department of Agriculture site, www.mypyramid.gov and the United Dairymen of Idaho (2009) Power Point presentation on recovery nutrition for athletes. Adobe Connect URL: http://edtech.na5.acrobat.com/markusfit/ Username: Therese519@gmail.com Password: edtech *Important Note: This Breeze presentation was created for EdTech 521, but was adapted for this project and now includes a quiz and nutrition log assessment. Due to my Adobe Connect account being expired, the log-in is for the EdTech 521 course under Dr. Therese Letourneau, for grading access by Dr. Ross Perkins and Jennifer Donatelli, Graduate Assistant. The course may also be converted into Google Docs or Flash, but the quiz portion would need to be adapted or created in another manner, such as a Google Docs quiz or paper quiz for students. The course access for grading is the Adobe Connect through EdTech and is the best example of the finished product with voice and assessments. Part 5b: Assessment Materials For this course, there will be two assessments. The first assessment will be a quiz that will be administered at the end of the slide presentation of the course. This quiz may be taken as many times as necessary to pass with a score of 80% or better. On some questions, the student can take a second chance at the answer while in the quiz. If the student does not pass this portion of the course, they will need to take the online course again and make another attempt at the quiz. Once the quiz is passed, the student will receive an e-mail attachment, if applicable, with the nutrition log that they will use for two weeks to monitor their food intake. The nutrition log can be located in Appendix A. At the end of the two weeks, they will submit the nutrition log to the facilitator or coach
  18. 18. Markus| 18 for full course credit. The grading rubric for the assessment of the course is located in Appendix B. Part 5c: Technology Tool Rationale The technology tool for this course is the presentation itself. The presentation was created in Power Point and can be easily converted into an online course by using iSpring Free version or Google Docs, if Adobe Connect is not an option for the school. For this version of the course, the presentation was created in Adobe Connect Presenter and the web link, username and password will be given to the students when they enter the computer lab to take the course. For this project, the course was created in Adobe Presenter for EdTech 521 and adapted to meet the needs of this project, adding a quiz element and nutrition log activity. The information card will be given back to the lab monitor or facilitator after the student has completed the online section of the course. This method was chosen because of the high-numbers of students that will need to complete the course each sport season. With this method, the student can visit the computer lab on their own time, or a team can visit during a scheduled practice time. Attendance of the course is mandatory and it will be recorded on a master sign-in sheet in the computer lab. The nutrition log will be delivered electronically to the student, if applicable, so they can save the Word document to their computer for the two-week nutrition intake recording and for their own future use. It is not mandatory for them to use this log, as they may create one of their own, but it is a good example that they can use if they like.
  19. 19. Markus| 19 Part 6: Formative Evaluation Plan Part 6a: Expert Review SME Name: Beth Christiansen Reason for Choosing SME: Beth is a certified nutritionist and personal trainer for a large health club in California. She works primarily with high-school aged kids and women, but designs nutritional programs for all ages. Beth has a very successful career in nutrition and she is passionate about helping kids learn to eat healthier. An instrument has been designed for her to answer simple questions regarding the subject matter, thus allowing her to give any feedback necessary. The instrument that was created may be found in Section 7b as Table 3. The SME, or Subject Matter Expert, was sent the presentation and materials on November 20th, 2009 and feedback was received on December 1st, 2009. The evaluation instrument may be located in Appendix E. Part 6b: One-to-one Evaluation According to Smith and Ragan (2005), during one-to-one evaluation, the designer tries out the instructional materials with two or more members of the target audience. For this course, the target audience is 9-12 grade student-athletes. To perform a one-to- one evaluation on this particular set of students, a designer could use a small group of three student-athletes arranged through either a coach or the athletic director to perform a trial run-through of the course, and would have them look at the nutrition log form and get their views on whether the form is easy to understand and potentially use. During the online portion, the designer would sit down with them and follow them through the course listening to their comments or asking simple design and content related questions along the way. The following questions could be asked: 1. Do you understand the instruction that you are receiving? 2. Are the directions for the quiz and nutrition log easy to understand and follow? 3. What do you think of the graphics on the online course? Do they properly represent the overall theme of the course? 4. Is the text easy to understand or are there any words that are difficult to define? 5. Did you encounter any spelling or grammatical errors while taking the online course?
  20. 20. Markus| 20 Part 6c: Small Group Evaluation According to Smith and Ragan (2005), small-group evaluation is used to check the efficacy of the revisions based on the one-to-one data, to ascertain how well the instruction works with more varied learners, and to see how the instruction teaches without the designer’s intervention. For a small-group evaluation of the online nutrition course and nutrition log, a designer would again utilize a small group of 9th-12th grade student-athletes under the guidance of a coach or athletic director to attend the online course and a shortened version of the nutrition log assessment. This group would include approximately ten students of varying ages and grades. During the online course, students would guide themselves through the course, following the directions on the password card. Help would be offered to students that seemed to be struggling with the computer or content. After the online course is complete, the nutrition log would be handed out as a hard copy for the student to take home and record their diets for three days and then collect them and have them answer a simple questionnaire about their nutrition log experience, including if they managed to stay with their healthy food choices, how they felt during exercise, and if they feel they could have continued for another two weeks with the regimen. All of the information gathered and interpreted and any adjustments to the course would be made before going to the field trial. Part 6d: Field Trial During the field trial, the designer would be determining the effectiveness of the revisions made during small-group evaluation and address any problems that arise during real world instruction, and validate the instruction with a large enough sample of the target audience to make a confident prediction of its effectiveness (Smith and Ragan, 2005). For this field trial, a larger group of student-athletes would be arranged to participate in the online course and complete the full two-week nutrition log. This group will be arranged by a coach or athletic director and will take place at the beginning of a sport season, as the actual course is intended to. The following questions will be addressed by this field trial: 1. Can the instruction be implemented as it was designed? 2. Are any administrative issues encountered? 3. Is the facilitator guide and materials readily available and easy to understand? 4. Have the learners attained the information as explained in the objectives? 5. Are the timeframes for the activities sufficient for course completion? 6. How do the facilitators or administrators feel about the course and the delivery methods? 7. Did the facilitators need to make any adaptations or adjustments to the course timeframe or materials?
  21. 21. Markus| 21 Part 7: Formative Evaluation Report Part 7a: Evaluation Survey The survey shown in Table 3 was sent to Beth Christiansen, the Subject Matter Expert for this project. The materials sent to her included the survey, the Power Point presentation containing the online course, and sample versions of other support materials. In Table 3, the questions that were created were simple and content specific. In the table, the SME responses are shown. The table is divided into six areas, including Presentation and Graphics, Vocabulary, Content, Assessment, and Support Materials. *Important Note: As per Dr. Perkins via e-mail on December 1, 2009, permission was granted to place the full completed Survey Table into the document, with minor revisions to alleviate too much space used by table. Part 7b: Report of Expert Review Below is a copy of the expert review table that was sent to the SME, Beth Christiansen, who is a Nutritionist and Personal Trainer in Santa Barbara, California. Beth’s comments have been highlighted in blue. Table 3 SME Name Beth Christiansen Date: December 1, 2009 Project Topic Nutrition for Student-Athletes Area 1.0 Presentation and Graphics Comments 1.1 How did you feel aboutthe overall appearance ofthe presentation? Erin, the presentation was fantastic! I really enjoyed the graphics and the topics about athletic nutrition that you chose to emphasize. The pictures of the yummy healthy food made me hungry! Your graphic theme maintained throughout the entire course. 1.2 Were the graphics appropriate for the topic of student-athlete nutrition? All of the graphics were excellent. My favorite was the little smiley with the droopy muscles. Having the visual graphic of the urine colors was very beneficial because it gives the kids a visual reference of something that is very easy to look for in signs of dehydration. 1.3 Did the slide design coordinate well throughoutthe presentation? The slide design and graphics coordinated very well throughout the entire presentation. The color scheme was good and so were the pictures. 1.4 Was the type font and letter sizing easy to read? All fonts and letter sizing was easy during the slide. My only recommendation would be on the sample nutrition log on the last slide to be enlarged. That was a little difficult to read. 1.5 Was the voice on the presentation easyto hear and understand? Your voice sounded good and you spoke slowly and not computer-like. I noticed you got tongue-tied a couple of times, but that should be of minimal concern, as they were barely noticed by me. Area 2.0 Vocabulary Comments 2.1 Did you find any vocabulary words that may be too difficult for the target audience? At the beginning on the course introduction slide, some of the wording could be a little too “teacheresque” for kids, such as the words summative and assessment. Some kids
  22. 22. Markus| 22 may get confused by the term “nutrient transport” on the hydration slide. You may not need to include the statement about “replacing muscle glycogen” on the recovery slide. Most kids probably do not know what this is yet. The teacher may get too many questions about this term. These were the only words or phrases that I feel could be removed or altered for age appropriateness. 2.2 Were you able to define difficult words using the context of the slide information? Yes, on some of the words this was possible. The kids may be able to figure out that the muscles use glycogen for energy because of how it is used with the word energy. Nutrient transport may be able to be defined by looking at the words separately and knowing their meanings. Summative is used in the same sentence as “at the end of the course” so this may be understood just fine by that statement. Most kids know what an assessment is, but by the rest of the information provided, they will probably be able to figure out that it relates to a quiz or test. Area 3.0 Content Comments 3.1 Is the contentof the course accurate and up-to-date with current standards? After reading through your presentation, all of the numbers and statistics that you mentioned seemedto be right on for current trends and standards. You did not use a lot of statistical numbers, so that will alleviate any discrepancy on that matter. I looked through the Dairymen of Idaho presentation that you pulled some of the statistics of youth eating habits and they did not provide the reference where they got their numbers from, but you referencedthem, so you should be okay with those statistics..they are scary! As far as the information on recovery nutrition, that information is accurate with the information that I have in some of my books, as far as eating and hydration timelines. Those numbers are pretty standard. Your food suggestions were very good and nicely varied for different tastes. Again, the lists made me hungry! Good job. 3.2 Does the content presenta consistentperspective on athletic nutrition? Yes, as I mentioned previously, all of your information is accurate and valuable for student-athletes. Your delivery of the information is not “preachy” but informative. You definitely covered the most important elements of nutrition in sports, such as dehydration, pre, during, and post-activity nutrition. These are all important. 3.3 Is the contentappropriate for the target audience? I do feel the content is appropriate for the age group. The information is simple and easily understandable. The presentation is not too long and wordy and had good graphics, so the kids should be able to maintain their focus on it. You did a good job of not getting too technical on the nutritional terms. 3.4 Are the objectives of the course appropriate for the expected outcomes? The objectives you stated were right on track with the content of the course. All objectives are easily attainable with minimal education on the topic. The expectations are not too overwhelming and I hope the kids will get something out of this and be able to use the skills and nutrition log to benefit their health. You can teach them how to do these things and they may even be able to recall everything they have learned, but getting them to understand the importance of maintaining the lifestyle will be the greatest challenge that they will have to encounter on their own. 3.5 Does the content of the course maintain consistencyto the objectives? Yes, as I stated above, the content and objectives coordinate very well and all expected outcomes are easily attainable, but changing their lifestyle will be the variable here. 3.6 Are there any content areas that you feel may have been You know, Erin, I think you did a great job choosing which topics to emphasize for this course without making it too
  23. 23. Markus| 23 missed thatcould be crucial to the course? long or technical. You are to the point and keep it simple and easy to understand for the age group it is intended for. I don’t think, without getting more technical, that you could have included much more information that is necessary. 3.7 Do you think the content of the course could be adapted to different athletic situations, such as sportspecific nutritional needs? Yes, very much so. I think the basic information should stay the same for all athletes, but you can always add in additional sections for athletes that require more stringent nutritional intakes, such as wrestlers,football players and runners. There is so much information that you can find for each and every sport, but some definitely have more emphasis on caloric intake and higher risk for dehydration. This information may be given to these athletes as an additional informational pamphlet or a whole other slide presentation meant for them specifically. Area 4.0 Assessment Comments 4.1 Are the assessments used in the course appropriate for the objectives of the course? The assessments are very appropriate for the course. The quiz is very basic and to the point. The questions were easily found in the presentation and pretty basic. The nutrition log is very simple to use and easy to replicate if the students can not use the one you made. The can do this in a spiral notebook if need be. It is good that you did not ask for too much information on the log sheets,such as calories and fat intake. Too much calorie counting would most definitely deter these kids from wanting to do this and kids this age should not be emphasizing calorie counting in their lives unless they have health or weight problems. 4.2 Was the online quiz portion of the course easyto navigate through? Yes, but I did not get to take the quiz “officially” because it was in the raw PP format still, but I see how it would work in an actual presentation. Good questions! 4.3 Is the nutrition log portion of the course consistentwith current nutritional trends? Like I stated above, I really enjoyed seeing your nutrition template because it is basic and easy to use for anybody. 4.4 Do you feel the quiz portion and the nutrition log are appropriate for the target audience? I do think the quiz and nutrition log are very appropriate for the age group. The expectations are not too overwhelming and they will definitely get something out of this without feeling pressuredto complete a difficult quiz or a detailed nutrition log. These are good for beginner use. Area 5.0 Support Materials Comments 5.1 Were all supportmaterials easy to read and understand? Yes, the support materials were easy to read and understand. It looks like you have all of your bases covered as far as sending the “whole package” to the school ready to use. All of the materials can be easily altered to fit the needs of the school as well. 5.2 Is the nutrition log appropriate for use as a nutritional aid? The log is well designed and simple to use. 5.3 Do the supportmaterials, located on the CD that will be sentto the facilitators,appear to be easy to understand and follow? Yes, I was able to open and understand all of the materials and I feel that any school that uses this information will be able to as well. My only recommendation, and you may have addressedthis already, is that a step-by-step guide or chart would be beneficial for the user to follow if they are unfamiliar with either nutrition or the computer needs. 5.4 Do you feel the support materials can be altered easily to fulfill the individual needs of the school receiving the course? (i.e. equipment,time) Yes, as mentioned before, I do think that any of these materials can be used to meet the needs of the program. Giving the school the raw power point presentation gives them the ability to put it into the format they need to have it viewed in, like Google, or like you said, Adobe. Area 6.0 Referenced Materials Comments 6.1 Do you feel the referenced agencies in this course are concurrentwith nutritional standards addressed today? I did look over the United Dairymen of Idaho site and presentation and their information seems up-to-date and thorough. The information that you acquired from the fitness.gov site was very good and up to current standards.
  24. 24. Markus| 24 Part 7c: Comments on Change I really appreciated the information that was received by my SME, Beth Christiansen. She really seemed to enjoy viewing my presentation and had very positive comments to say about it. After looking through the presentation again, I do not feel that any major changes needed to be made except some minor wording for age-appropriateness. I have made these changes already. Her feedback was very good and she feels the presentation is very appropriate for the age group that will be the target audience. She mentioned that it should not be too technical or have confusing information that may be unnecessary for the intent of the course. I did keep the presentation very basic and not technical due to the age group of the target audience, 9th through 12th graders. Since the project version is presented as a Breeze Presentation through Adobe Connect, this may pose a problem to schools that may not have access to using Adobe Connect. I chose to use Breeze for this purpose because I feel the quality of the presentation of the course is very good and I am familiar with using Breeze, or Adobe Presenter. The course may be adapted to a school’s needs by converting the Power Point presentation to either Google Docs or a Flash Presentation by using an add-on such as iSpring Free version in Power Point. If this is the case, the quiz portion of the course will not work properly and these slides would need to be removed and the presentation would be an educational slide presentation with the quiz component being separate, either by using Google Docs for a quiz creator or just including a paper and pencil quiz in the computer lab. There are options for variety with this course and it can be easily adapted to meet the needs of a school or program.
  25. 25. Markus| 25 Part 8: AECT Standards Grid Professional Standards Addressed (AECT) The following standards, developed by the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT), and used in the accreditation process established by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), are addressed to some degree in this course. The numbers of the standards correspond to the numbers next to the course tasks show on the list of assignments. Not all standards are addressed explicitly through student work. Assignments meeting standard in whole or part Standard 1: DESIGN 1.1 Instructional Systems Design (ISD) X ID Projects 1 & 2 1.1.1 Analyzing X ID Projects 1 1.1.2 Designing X ID Projects 1 & 2 1.1.3 Developing X ID Projects 1 & 2 1.1.4 Implementing X ID Project 2 1.1.5 Evaluating X Selected Discussion Forums; ID Project 2 1.2 Message Design 1.3 Instructional Strategies X ID Project 2 1.4 Learner Characteristics X ID Project 1 Standard 2: DEVELOPMENT 2.0 (includes 2.0.1 to 2.0.8) X ID Project 02 2.1 Print Technologies X Reading Quiz; ID Projects 1 & 2 2.2 Audiovisual Technologies 2.3 Computer-Based Technologies X (all assignments) 2.4 Integrated Technologies Standard 3: UTILIZATION 3.0 (includes 3.0.1 & 3.0.2) 3.1 Media Utilization X (all assignments) 3.2 Diffusion of Innovations 3.3 Implementation and Institutionalization X ID Project 2 3.4 Policies and Regulations Standard 4: MANAGEMENT 4.0 (includes 4.0.1 & 4.0.3) 4.1 Project Management 4.2 Resource Management 4.3 Delivery System Management
  26. 26. Markus| 26 4.4 Information Management Standard 5: EVALUATION 5.1 Problem Analysis X 5.2 Criterion-Referenced Measurement X ID Project 2 5.3 Formative and Summative Evaluation X ID Project 2 5.4 Long-Range Planning COURSE GOALS & OBJECTIVES The overall goal for the course is for each student to consider and use the systematic process of instructional design to create an instructional product. To achieve this goal, students will engage in activities that promote reflective practice, emphasize realistic contexts, and employ a number of communications technologies. Following the course, students will be able to: 1. Discuss the historical development of the practice of instructional design with regard to factors that led to its development and the rationale for its use 2. Describe at least two reasons why instructional design models are useful 3. Identify at least six instructional design models and classify them according to their use 4. Compare and contrast the major elements of three theories of learning as they relate to instructional design 5. Define “instructional design.” 6. Define the word “systematic” as it relates to instructional design 7. Define “learning” and synthesize its definition with the practice of instructional design 8. Relate the design of instruction to the term “educational (or “instructional”) technology” 9. Describe the major components of the instructional design process and the functions of models in the design process 10. Provide a succinct summary of various learning contexts (declarative knowledge, conceptual, declarative, principle, problem-solving, cognitive, attitudinal, and psychomotor)
  27. 27. Markus| 27 11. Build an instructional design product that integrates major aspects of the systematic process and make this available on the web. a. Describe the rationale for and processes associated with needs, learner, context, goal, and task analyses i. Create and conduct various aspects of a front-end analysis ii. Identify methods and materials for communicating subject matter that are contextually relevant b. Describe the rationale for and processes associated with creating design documents (objectives, motivation, etc.) i. Construct clear instructional goals and objectives ii. Develop a motivational design for a specific instructional task iii. Develop assessments that accurately measure performance objectives c. Select and implement instructional strategies for selected learning tasks i. Select appropriate media tools that support instructional design decisions d. Describe the rationale and processes associated with the formative evaluation of instructional products i. Create a plan for formative evaluation 12. Identify and use technology resources to enable and empower learners with diverse backgrounds, characteristics, and abilities. 13. Apply state and national content standards to the development of instructional products 14. Meet selected professional standards developed by the Association for Educational Communications and Technology 15. Use various technological tools for instructional and professional communication
  28. 28. Markus| 28 AECT STANDARDS (Applicable to EDTECH 503) 1.0 Design 1.1 Instructional Systems Design 1.1.a Utilize and implement design principles which specify optimal conditions for learning. 1.1.b Identify a variety of instructional systems design models and apply at least one model. 1.1.1 Analyzing 1.1.1.a Write appropriate objectives for specific content and outcome levels. 1.1.1.b Analyze instructional tasks, content, and context. 1.1.2 Designing 1.1.2.a Create a plan for a topic of a content area (e.g., a thematic unit, a text chapter, an interdisciplinary unit) to demonstrate application of the principles of macro-level design. 1.1.2.b Create instructional plans (micro-level design) that address the needs of all learners, including appropriate accommodations for learners with special needs. 1.1.2.d Incorporate contemporary instructional technology processes in the development of interactive lessons that promote student learning. 1.1.3 Developing 1.1.3.a Produce instructional materials which require the use of multiple media (e.g., computers, video, projection). 1.1.3.b Demonstrate personal skill development with at least one: computer authoring application, video tool, or electronic communication application. 1.1.4 Implementing 1.1.4.a Use instructional plans and materials which they have produced in contextualized instructional settings (e.g., practica, field experiences, training) that address the needs of all learners, including appropriate accommodations for learners with special needs. 1.1.5 Evaluating 1.1.5.a Utilize a variety of assessment measures to determine the adequacy of learning and instruction. 1.1.5.b Demonstrate the use of formative and summative evaluation within practice and contextualized field experiences. 1.1.5.c Demonstrate congruency among goals/objectives, instructional strategies, and assessment measures.
  29. 29. Markus| 29 1.3 Instructional Strategies 1.3.a Select instructional strategies appropriate for a variety of learner characteristics and learning situations. 1.3.b Identify at least one instructional model and demonstrate appropriate contextualized application within practice and field experiences. 1.3.c Analyze their selection of instructional strategies and/or models as influenced by the learning situation, nature of the specific content, and type of learner objective. 1.3.d Select motivational strategies appropriate for the target learners, task, and learning situation. 1.4 Learner Characteristics 1.4.a Identify a broad range of observed and hypothetical learner characteristics for their particular area(s) of preparation. 1.4.b Describe and/or document specific learner characteristics which influence the selection of instructional strategies. 1.4.c Describe and/or document specific learner characteristics which influence the implementation of instructional strategies. 2.0 Development 2.0.1 Select appropriate media to produce effective learning environments using technology resources. 2.0.2 Use appropriate analog and digital productivity tools to develop instructional and professional products. 2.0.3 Apply instructional design principles to select appropriate technological tools for the development of instructional and professional products. 2.0.4 Apply appropriate learning and psychological theories to the selection of appropriate technological tools and to the development of instructional and professional products. 2.0.5 Apply appropriate evaluation strategies and techniques for assessing effectiveness of instructional and professional products. 2.0.6 Use the results of evaluation methods and techniques to revise and update instructional and professional products. 2.0.7 Contribute to a professional portfolio by developing and selecting a variety of productions for inclusion in the portfolio. 2.1 Print Technologies 2.1.3 Use presentation application software to produce presentations and supplementary materials for instructional and professional purposes. 2.1.4 Produce instructional and professional products using various aspects of integrated application programs.
  30. 30. Markus| 30 2.3 Computer-Based Technologies 2.3.2 Design, produce, and use digital information with computer-based technologies. 3.0 Utilization 3.1 Media Utilization 3.1.1 Identify key factors in selecting and using technologies appropriate for learning situations specified in the instructional design process. 3.1.2 Use educational communications and instructional technology (SMETS) resources in a variety of learning contexts. 3.3 Implementation and Institutionalization 3.3.1 Use appropriate instructional materials and strategies in various learning contexts. 3.3.2 Identify and apply techniques for integrating SMETS innovations in various learning contexts. 3.3.3 Identify strategies to maintain use after initial adoption. 4.0 Management (none specifically addressed in 503) 5.0 Evaluation 5.1 Problem Analysis 5.1.1 Identify and apply problem analysis skills in appropriate school media and educational technology (SMET) contexts (e.g., conduct needs assessments, identify and define problems, identify constraints, identify resources, define learner characteristics, define goals and objectives in instructional systems design, media development and utilization, program management, and evaluation). 5.2 Criterion-referenced Measurement 5.2.1 Develop and apply criterion-referenced measures in a variety of SMET contexts. 5.3 Formative and Summative Evaluation 5.3.1 Develop and apply formative and summative evaluation strategies in a variety of SMET contexts. SMET = School Media & Educational Technologies
  31. 31. Markus| 31 Appendix A Nutrition Log Template Sample: Monday Two Eggs Toast Orange Juice Ham Sandwich Apple Graham Crackers Water Baked Chicken Carrots Stuffing Milk Granola Bar Yogurt Pretzels Orange Tuesday Date (Week 1) Breakfast Lunch Dinner Snacks Monday Tuesday Wednesday
  32. 32. Markus| 32 Appendix B Grading Rubric Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Day (Week 2) Breakfast Lunch Dinner Snacks Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday SundayDay (Week 1) Breakfast Lunch Dinner Snacks Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
  33. 33. Markus| 33 Grading Rubric for Student-Athlete Nutrition Course Pass Fail Online course completion The athlete attended the entire course online The athlete did not attend the online course Quiz Score The student passed the online quiz with a score of 80% or more The student did not pass the online quiz with a score of 80% or more Nutrition Log The student completed the two-week nutrition log and submitted it to the instructor The student did not complete and/or did not turn in the nutrition log to the instructor Appendix C
  34. 34. Markus| 34 Lab Check-in and E-Mail Collection Sheet Template Student Name (please print clearly) Sport E-Mail Address (please print clearly) Quiz Passed (Y/N) James Athlete Football jafoot@abc.com Y Appendix D
  35. 35. Markus| 35 Computer Lab Instruction Cards Template Computer Lab Instructions 1. Find an empty computer station 2. Go to InternetExplorer 3. Type in URL: : http://edtech.na5.acrobat.com/markusfit/ Username: Therese519@gmail.com Password:edtech 4. When finished turn-in card and record on sign-in if quiz was passed. 5. When you receive an e-mail containing nutrition log,you may begin the two-week nutrition log and then turn it in to course facilitator. Computer Lab Instructions 1. Find an empty computer station 2. Go to InternetExplorer 3. Type in URL: : http://edtech.na5.acrobat.com/markusfit/ Username: Therese519@gmail.com Password:edtech 4. When finished turn-in card and record on sign-in if quiz was passed. 5. When you receive an e-mail containing nutrition log,you may begin the two-week nutrition log and then turn it in to course facilitator. Computer Lab Instructions 1. Find an empty computer station 2. Go to InternetExplorer 3. Type in URL: : http://edtech.na5.acrobat.com/markusfit/ Username: Therese519@gmail.com Password:edtech 4. When finished turn-in card and record on sign-in if quiz was passed. 5. When you receive an e-mail containing nutrition log,you may begin the two-week nutrition log and then turn it in to course facilitator. Computer Lab Instructions 1. Find an empty computer station 2. Go to InternetExplorer 3. Type in URL: : http://edtech.na5.acrobat.com/markusfit/ Username: Therese519@gmail.com Password:edtech 4. When finished turn-in card and record on sign-in if quiz was passed. 5. When you receive an e-mail containing nutrition log,you may begin the two-week nutrition log and then turn it in to course facilitator. Appendix E
  36. 36. Markus| 36 SME Evaluation Instrument SME Name Beth Christiansen Project Topic Nutrition for Student-Athletes Area 1.0 Presentation and Graphics Comments 1.1 How did you feel aboutthe overall appearance of the presentation? 1.2 Were the graphics appropriate for the topic of student-athlete nutrition? 1.3 Did the slide design coordinate well throughoutthe presentation? 1.4 Was the type font and letter sizing easy to read? 1.5 Was the voice on the presentation easyto hear and understand? Area 2.0 Vocabulary Comments 2.1 Did you find any vocabulary words that may be too difficult for the target audience? 2.2 Were you able to define difficult words using the context of the slide information? Area 3.0 Content Comments 3.1 Is the contentof the course accurate and up-to- date with current standards? 3.2 Does the content presenta consistentperspective on athletic nutrition? 3.3 Is the contentappropriate for the target audience? 3.4 Are the objectives of the course appropriate for the expected outcomes? 3.5 Does the content of the course maintain consistencyto the objectives? 3.6 Are there any content areas that you feel may have been missed thatcould be crucial to the course? 3.7 Do you think the content of the course could be adapted to different athletic situations,such as sportspecific nutritional needs? Area 4.0 Assessment Comments 4.1 Are the assessments used in the course appropriate for the objectives of the course? 4.2 Was the online quiz portion of the course easyto navigate through? 4.3 Is the nutrition log portion of the course consistent with currentnutritional trends? 4.4 Do you feel the quiz portion and the nutrition log are appropriate for the target audience? Area 5.0 Support Materials Comments 5.1 Were all supportmaterials easyto read and understand? 5.2 Is the nutrition log appropriate for use as a nutritional aid? 5.3 Do the supportmaterials,located on the CD that will be sentto the facilitators,appear to be easyto understand and follow? 5.4 Do you feel the supportmaterials can be altered easilyto fulfill the individual needs ofthe school receiving the course? (i.e. equipment,time,etc.) References
  37. 37. Markus| 37 Smith, P. L., & Ragan, T. J. (2005). Instructional Design, Third Edition. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Keller, J. M. (1987). The systematic process of motivational design. Performance & Instruction, 26 (9/10), 1-8. Agriculture, U. S. (2009, September 17). MyPyramid. Retrieved November 12, 2009, from www.mypyramid.gov Idaho, U. D. (2009). United Dairymen of Idaho. Retrieved November 12, 2009, from www.idahodairycouncil.com

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