How The Advertising Industry Thinks

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This presentation takes a closer look at what ad agencies consider “good” advertising, how they interpret “concept,” and why the web designer's notion of “proof of concept” is completely nonsensical in the world of advertising. I examine some successful campaigns and some award-winning campaigns -- these are not necessarily the same thing -- and explain why these are admired by so-called “creatives” at ad agencies. I also explore why advertising creatives despise web types in general and usability folks in particular. You’ll discover why stuff that “works” on screen doesn’t work in print ads -- and vice versa. And I dispel some of the popular myths about advertising, such as “all advertising is good advertising.”

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How The Advertising Industry Thinks

  1. 1. How the ad industry thinks A politically incorrect review Eric Reiss IA Summit 25 March 2007 Las Vegas, Nevada
  2. 2. Jacques Séguéla
  3. 3. “Don’t tell my mother I work in an advertising agency. She thinks I play piano in a whorehouse.” Jacques Séguéla
  4. 4. Big Al’s Brothel (one flight up)
  5. 5. ad· ver· tise verb 1 : inform, notify 2 : to call public attention to esp. in order to sell
  6. 6. A brief history of advertising
  7. 7. “For the return of my slave to the shop of Hapu the Weaver, where the best cloth is woven to your desires, a whole gold coin is offered”
  8. 8. A brief history of advertising
  9. 9. 1996 Business issues Tactical Strategic Technical issues
  10. 10. 1999 Business issues Tactical Strategic Technical issues
  11. 11. 1999 Business issues Tactical Strategic Technical issues
  12. 12. 2005-6 2004 Business issues Tactical Strategic Technical issues
  13. 13. Business analysts understand the boxes. But only we understand the arrows.
  14. 14. We can’t expect ad agencies to understand how we think until we understand how they think
  15. 15. Three ways that guarantee we lose our place at the table Insisting we invented user research Misunderstanding “concept” Humiliating established art directors
  16. 16. We all know that Jakob invented user testing...
  17. 17. 1925
  18. 18. John Caples 1932 >
  19. 19. “Accept nothing as true about what works best in advertising until it has been scientifically tested.” John Caples
  20. 20. OK. But we really understand research, don’t we?
  21. 21. 1908
  22. 22. Claude Hopkins 1930 >
  23. 23. “Talk to the people who are going to buy your product. This is the first step in any successful campaign” Claude Hopkins
  24. 24. Well, B.J. taught us about trustbuilding ...
  25. 25. 1960
  26. 26. David Ogilvy 1983 1962 >
  27. 27. “What really decides consumers to buy or not to buy is the content of your advertising, not its form.” David Ogilvy
  28. 28. A few other advertising legends ...
  29. 29. Rosser Reeves “Find the USP.”
  30. 30. Leo Burnett “Find the drama.”
  31. 31. Bill Bernbach “Tell the story”
  32. 32. Meet the Mattel See ’n Say
  33. 33. Jeez, Eric, what’s the problem ?
  34. 34. A Awareness I Interest D Desire A Action
  35. 35. “The secret of all effective originality in advertising is not the creation of new and tricky words and pictures, but one of putting familiar words and pictures into new relationships.” Leo Burnett
  36. 36. Winter landscape (see ’n say)
  37. 37. Scene of the crime (effective juxtaposition)
  38. 38. What makes the See ’n Say the lowest form of advertising? It relies on an eyecatching irrelevancy!
  39. 39. The Australian tourist board understands what the chamber of commerce doesn’t
  40. 40. Forcing a see ’n say
  41. 41. See ’n Say is acceptable for illustrations (but only just)
  42. 42. See ’n Say is fine for logos (because they are icons)
  43. 43. Babies, boobs, and beagles (the three not-so-secret weapons of bad advertising)
  44. 44. For art’s sake...
  45. 45. Tell the story Find the drama
  46. 46. Photo courtesy of Mark Hurst
  47. 47. Apogee – a lesson learned ... and forgotton
  48. 48. Before (see ‘n say)
  49. 49. After (elegant)
  50. 50. “We don’t need no stinking ad agency”
  51. 51. Back to see ‘n say
  52. 52. Boring doesn’t sell
  53. 53. The ad agencies don’t always get it right either
  54. 54. “Too clever” “This is funny!”
  55. 55. “Do you want fine writing? Or do you want your goddamn sales to go up?” Rosser Reeves
  56. 56. Let’s turn to the concept of concept
  57. 57. In advertising, concept represents the big idea
  58. 58. In the web world, concept represents ... er ...
  59. 59. In advertising, there is only one proof of concept
  60. 60. Crap B2B
  61. 61. Effective B2B
  62. 62. Now entering the mind of the art director
  63. 63. Boring blue corporate color
  64. 64. Modern color. And a graphic swish
  65. 65. Yin and Yang? Hmm…
  66. 66. Wildly different customers…
  67. 67. Let’s kill a myth
  68. 68. “All advertising is good advertising.” They
  69. 69. Think of the advertiser as a person ...
  70. 70. Now consider this: Do you befriend liars? Do you admire fools? Do you trust strangers? Do you respect incompetence?
  71. 71. Fact: A Milwaukee brewer found out sales fell among target audiences that could remember their advertising.
  72. 72. 1972 Popular tag (second-largest brewer in USA)
  73. 73. 1982 Crap concept (sales decline in all markets)
  74. 74. 1984 Out of business
  75. 75. Thanks!
  76. 76. Eric Reiss can (usually) be found at: The FatDUX Group ApS Strandøre 15 2100 Copenhagen Denmark Office: (+45) 39 29 67 77 Mobil: (+45) 20 12 88 44 Twitter: elreiss info@fatdux.com www.fatdux.com

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