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Strengths-Based Leadership for VALOR

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Presentations for the Virginia Agriculture Leaders Obtaining Results (VALOR) program. Highlights perceptions of leadership, principles of strengths-based leadership, and framework for courageous followership.

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Strengths-Based Leadership for VALOR

  1. 1. Strengths-Based Leadership (and Followership) Presented by Eric K. Kaufman July 23, 2013
  2. 2. Who is Eric Kaufman? • Associate Professor & Extension Specialist • Lead researcher for VALOR program launch • Coordinator of VT’s Graduate Certificate in Collaborative Community Leadership • Former H.S. AgriScience Teacher
  3. 3. Our Agenda… 1. Personalizing Leadership 2. Principles of Strengths- Based Leadership 3. Partnering with Courageous Followers 4. Strategies for Application
  4. 4. Virginia Agriculture’s Interest (Kaufman et al., 2010) “Growing new leaders and enhancing the skills of current leaders is vitally important to the future of agriculture.” “I believe that the more involved one becomes in problem solving, working in team/group settings with a strong community commitment the more people can work together to solve any and all problems their community is faced with. Since agriculture is so critical anything we can do to provide leadership learning in this area would be extremely beneficial.”
  5. 5. VALOR Vision Statement The Virginia Agriculture Leaders Obtaining Results (VALOR) program will provide a sustainable future for Virginia's agricultural community by maximizing potential for successful growth through a system of networking, collaborative decision-making, and development of strong leaders.
  6. 6. WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT LEADERSHIP?
  7. 7. GALLUP POLL – LEADERSHIP ABILITY Out of 1,001 U.S. adults surveyed, 97% rated their ability to lead as being at or above average. 97% 3% At or Above Average Below Average What % of U.S. adults rate their leadership ability as being at or above average?
  8. 8. GALLUP POLL – LEADERSHIP EXPERIENCE Out of 1,001 U.S. adults surveyed, more than two- thirds reported that they have led a group or team. 67% 33% Led a Group or Team Yes No What % of U.S. adults have led a group or team?
  9. 9. How Do You Define Leadership? • Defining Leadership through Personalized Plates – Use template to create a personalized license plate that identifies a characteristic of leadership. – Your plate may have a combination of up to seven letters, numbers, and/or special characters. – Creativity is encouraged.
  10. 10. Leadership Lessons from Dancing Guy
  11. 11. How Do You Define Leadership? • Defining Leadership through Personalized Plates – Use template to create a personalized license plate that identifies a characteristic of leadership. – Your plate may have a combination of up to seven letters, numbers, and/or special characters. – Creativity is encouraged.
  12. 12. Caveat on Studying Leadership “The distinctive feature of leadership is that it would appear the more we learn about leadership, the more we realize we have to and want to learn.” (Jackson & Parry, 2008, p. 9)
  13. 13. Leadership Defined “Leadership is the art of accomplishing more than the science of management says is possible.” – Colin Powell, American statesman and retired four-star general in the United States Army “Leadership is the art of mobilizing others to want to struggle for shared aspirations.” – James Kouzes & Barry Posner, leadership researchers and authors of The Leadership Challenge “Leadership is a process whereby an individual influences a group of individuals to achieve a common goal.” – Peter Northouse, professor of communication and author of Leadership: Theory and Practice
  14. 14. Five Ways to Study Leadership (Jackson & Parry, 2008) • Attempt to lead • Observe leadership in action • Talk about leadership • Read about leadership • Write about leadership
  15. 15. Exemplary Leadership Practices (Kouzes & Posner, 2007) Challenging the Process Inspiring a Shared Vision Enabling Others to Act Modeling the Way Encouraging the Heart
  16. 16. FINDING YOURSELF AS A LEADER
  17. 17. Multi-Level View of Leadership Development (Avolio, 2005) Life Experiences Talents & Capacities Self Aware Self- Regulate Self- Develop Triggers Culture Vision How am I Supported? Where do I come from? Who am I?
  18. 18. Personal SWOT Analysis Strengths •What do you do well? •What do others see as your strengths? Weaknesses •What could you improve? •What are others likely to see as weaknesses? Opportunities •What trends could you take advantage of? •How can you turn your strengths into opportunities? Threats •What trends could harm you? •What threats do your weaknesses expose you to?
  19. 19. Time Remaining: Personal SWOT •Complete the SWOT worksheet
  20. 20. STOP!
  21. 21. What do we do with the SWOT data? According to Gallup’s research the most effective leaders: 1. Are always investing in strengths 2. Surround themselves with the right people and then maximize their team 3. Understand their followers needs • Reference: Rath & Conchie’s (2008) Strengths Based Leadership
  22. 22. STRENGTHS-BASED LEADERSHIP
  23. 23. Early Leadership Theory: Traits • Premise: – All great leaders have common traits • Challenge: 1. Identify the leadership traits 2. Make people with those traits the leaders
  24. 24. Explaining Leadership Differences: Style Approaches to Leadership Leadership Grid Situational Leadership
  25. 25. Strengths-Based Leadership • Argues that we all have innate talents to be developed into strengths • Views leadership as a collective process • Recommends different strengths for different leadership situations
  26. 26. Leadership Myths and Truths Myths – Each of us can be anything we want to be if we just work hard. – We grow most where we are weakest. – Strengths will take care of themselves. Truths – You can be anything your strengths allow you to be. – We grow most in the areas we are already strong. – I can be taught knowledge and skills, but I can’t learn talents.
  27. 27. “A leader needs to know his strengths as a carpenter knows his tools, or as a physician knows the instruments at her disposal. What great leaders have in common is that each truly knows his or her strengths – and can call on the right strength at the right time. This explains why there is no definitive list of characteristics that describes all leaders.” - Donald O. Clifton, Gallup Researcher and Father of Strengths Psychology
  28. 28. What is a Strength? Weakness? STRENGTH • Consistent, near perfect performance in an activity = STRENGTH WEAKNESS • Something that gets in the way of excellent performance Knowledge + Skills + Talents
  29. 29. INDICATORS OF WEAKNESS • Feel defensive about performance – Develop obsessive behavior • Exhibit slow learning – Do not profit from with repeated experience • Experience a reduction of confidence from performing the activity • Lack futuristic thinking about the activity • Suffer burnout while practicing
  30. 30. How Do I Find My Strengths?  Listen to your yearnings  Watch for satisfactions  Watch for rapid learning  Glimpses of excellence  Total performance of excellence
  31. 31. Domains of Leadership Strength Executing Relationship Building Strategic Thinking Influencing Task- Oriented People- Oriented Future-Oriented Present-Oriented
  32. 32. Executing Domain Description • Know how to make things happen • Have ability to “catch” an idea and make it happen Talent Themes • Achiever • Arranger • Belief • Consistency • Deliberative • Discipline • Focus • Responsibility • Restorative
  33. 33. Relationship Building Domain Talent Themes • Adaptability • Developer • Connectedness • Empathy • Harmony • Includer • Individualization • Positivity • Relator Description • Provide essential glue that holds the team together • Create groups and organizations that are much greater than the sum of their parts
  34. 34. Strategic Thinking Domain Description • Keep us all focused on what could be • Constantly absorbing and analyzing information and helping the team make better decisions Talent Themes • Analytical • Context • Futuristic • Ideation • Input • Intellection • Learner • Strategic
  35. 35. Influencing Domain Talent Themes Description • Help the team reach a broader audience • Take charge, speak up, and make sure the group is heard • Activator • Command • Communication • Competition • Maximizer • Self-Assurance • Significance • Woo
  36. 36. What Are Others’ Strengths? • Discover the strengths and domains of others – Complete the worksheet with those around you • Draw one inclusive picture of the main strengths of those in your group – Include in the picture • The Strengths • The Domains
  37. 37. Time Remaining: Prepare a hieroglyphic that represents collaborative use of strengths represented in your group
  38. 38. STOP!
  39. 39. Gallup’s Approach to Strengths- Based Development
  40. 40. COURAGEOUS FOLLOWERS
  41. 41. Leaders vs. Followers
  42. 42. Common Purpose A New Model of Leader- Follower Relationships Leader Followers Shared Values Leaders and Followers Serve a Common Purpose Pursued Within Shared Values
  43. 43. Leading and Following Through Tango
  44. 44. 46 Leader-Follower Organization Leader-follower Leader-follower Leader-follower Leader-follower Leader-follower Leader-follower Leader-follower Leader-follower Leader-follower Leader-follower Source: Gene Dixon
  45. 45. Five Dimensions of Courageous Followership Courage to Assume Responsibility for common purpose Support leader and group energetically Take moral action when needed Participate in transformation Constructively challenge counterproductive policies & behaviors
  46. 46. FOLLOWERS’ BASIC NEEDS (ACCORDING TO GALLUP POLLS; RATH & CONCHIE, 2008) • Trust – Chances of being engaged at work when the individual does not trust the company’s leaders is just 1 in 12. • Compassion – Those who indicate “My supervisor, or someone at work, seems to care about me as a person” are: • Significantly more likely to stay with the organization • Substantially more productive
  47. 47. FOLLOWERS’ BASIC NEEDS (continued) (ACCORDING TO GALLUP POLLS; RATH & CONCHIE, 2008) • Stability – Those with high confidence in their company’s financial future are nine times more likely to be engaged in their jobs. • Hope – Among those who disagreed that their company’s leadership made them “feel enthusiastic about the future,” only 1% were engaged in their jobs.
  48. 48. Leader-Follower Organization Leader-follower Leader-follower Leader-follower Leader-follower Leader-follower Leader-follower Leader-follower Leader-follower Leader-follower Leader-follower 50 Source: Gene Dixon
  49. 49. What Strong Teams Have in Common (Rath & Conchie, 2008) 1. Conflict doesn’t destroy strong teams because strong teams focus on results 2. Strong teams prioritize what’s best for the organization and then move forward 3. Members of strong teams are as committed to their personal lives as they are to their work 4. Strong teams embrace diversity 5. Strong teams are magnets for talent
  50. 50. APPLYING WHAT WE HAVE LEARNED
  51. 51. Lesson for Practice “A leader is someone who can get things done through other people.” -Warren Buffet
  52. 52. Where Can We Apply Leadership? • Business • Community • Family • Professional Organizations
  53. 53. Multi-Level View of Leadership Development (Avolio, 2005) Life Experiences Talents & Capacities Self Aware Self- Regulate Self- Develop Triggers Culture Vision How am I Supported? What am I Experiencing? How do I develop and behave? Where do I come from? Who am I? What am I becoming?
  54. 54. Your Individual Development Plan • Name It • Claim It • Aim It
  55. 55. Implications for You and Others?
  56. 56. Thank you! Let me know how I can help • Eric Kaufman – EKaufman@VT.Edu

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