Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Dealing with Volatility in Feedstock Availability

189 views

Published on

Presentation by Eric Kingsley at the "opportunities for Underutilized Wood: Energy & Products Symposium", May 2018, West Virginia University and Penn Stat Extension.

Published in: Business
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Dealing with Volatility in Feedstock Availability

  1. 1. Dealing with Volatility in  Feedstock Availability Opportunities for Underutilized Wood: Energy & Products Regional Symposium May 2018 Eric Kingsley Innovative Natural Resource Solutions LLC kingsley@inrsllc.com Phone 207‐233‐9910 1
  2. 2. Innovative Natural Resource Solutions LLC • Founded in 1994 • Offices in New Hampshire and Maine • Focus at the intersection of forest industry, energy and  economic development • Services include:  ‐ consulting in renewable energy ‐ advocacy ‐ forest management and protection ‐ forest certification and sustainability  • Clients from the private, non‐profit and government sectors • Conducted work in all regions of North America • www.inrsllc.com 2
  3. 3. Are Forest‐Based Feedstocks Price Volatile? Maine Commercial Fuel Prices, $ per MMBTU 3  $‐  $5.00  $10.00  $15.00  $20.00  $25.00  $30.00  $35.00 Biomass Oil Natural Gas
  4. 4. White Pine Pulpwood New Hampshire, 2011 – 2017, Three Regions 4  $‐  $5  $10  $15  $20  $25  $30  $35  $40  $45 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 North Central South
  5. 5. White Pine Pulpwood New Hampshire, 2011 – 2017, Statewide 5  $‐  $5  $10  $15  $20  $25  $30  $35  $40 3Q 2011 4Q 2011 1Q 2012 2Q 2012 3Q 2012 4Q 2012 1Q 2013 2Q 2013 3Q 2013 4Q 2013 1Q 2014 2Q 2014 3Q 2014 4Q 2014 1Q 2015 2Q 2015 3Q 2015 4Q 2015 1Q 2016 2Q 2016 3Q 2016 4Q 2016 1Q 2017 2Q 2017 3Q 2017 4Q 2017
  6. 6. White Pine Pulpwood New Hampshire, 2011 – 2017, 4‐Quarter Trailing Average 6 $0 $5 $10 $15 $20 $25 $30 $35 $40 3Q 2011 4Q 2011 1Q 2012 2Q 2012 3Q 2012 4Q 2012 1Q 2013 2Q 2013 3Q 2013 4Q 2013 1Q 2014 2Q 2014 3Q 2014 4Q 2014 1Q 2015 2Q 2015 3Q 2015 4Q 2015 1Q 2016 2Q 2016 3Q 2016 4Q 2016 1Q 2017 2Q 2017 3Q 2017 4Q 2017
  7. 7. What Causes Feedstock Volatility? • Weather • Seasonality • Other Markets • Residues • Low‐Grade • End Use Markets • Diesel • Buyer Behavior • Investor Perception 7
  8. 8. Weather “If your paycheck depends on the weather and the clock…” • Weather can (will) disrupt logging and trucking operations • Rain can keep loggers out of the woods • Snow storms can idle harvesting • Depending upon your feedstock, major weather events (e.g.,  hurricanes) can cause • Restricted availability in the near‐term • Huge surge of material during clean‐up • Need very flexible feedstock requirements • Planning on a major weather event is a very bad plan • Way to address is through inventory management • Just‐in‐time procurement DOES NOT WORK for forest industry supply chain 8
  9. 9. Biomass Production Capacity as a Percentage of Market Demand (Historic) 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 120% 140% JA N FEB M A R APR M A Y JU NE JU LY AU G SEPT OCT NO V DEC Data Source: North Country Procurement Seasonality
  10. 10. Sawmill Residuals 10 Hog Fuel Sawdust Shavings Chips Industrial Boilers Beauty Bark Wood Composites Livestock Bedding Oil and Gas Absorbent $ Increasing Value                                         $ Paper
  11. 11. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Sawlogs Pulpwood Biomass Volume (Tons) Value ($) Volume and Value to Landowner of Products from a Timber Harvest North East State Foresters 2013
  12. 12. Forestry Biomass 12 Limbs Wood Fiber Solid Wood Lumber, Plywood OSB (other composites?) Heat and Power Biofuels Pellets No Conflict No ConflictPotential overlap $ Increasing Value                                         $ Commercial Thinning Paper
  13. 13. Forestry Biomass 13 Limbs Fiber Wood Solid Wood $ Increasing Value                                         $ Forest Thinning
  14. 14. End Use Markets • What drives stable prices is stable purchasing at the plant  • AND • Stable purchasing from all competing / interacting markets • In reality, that occurs only in the spreadsheets of consultants, not IRL • If a competing market suddenly needs lots of wood, they will get it,  and it might impact you • For example, during BCAP many biomass piles were as white as pulp chip piles • Relationships, patience and maybe some hedging will address 14
  15. 15. Diesel Impacts both harvesting and transport, can be hedged 15  $‐  $5.00  $10.00  $15.00  $20.00  $25.00  $30.00  $35.00  $40.00 1Q 10 2Q 10 3Q 10 4Q 10 1Q 11 2Q 11 3Q 11 4Q 11 1Q 12 2Q 12 3Q 12 4Q 12 1Q 13 2Q 13 3Q 13 4Q 13 1Q 14 2Q 14 3Q 14 4Q 14 1Q 15 2Q 15 3Q 15 4Q 15 1Q 16 2Q 16 3Q 16 4Q 16 1Q 17 2Q 17 3Q 17 4Q 17 Wood Diesel
  16. 16. Diesel –it’s in every load And…there are open markets for hedging… 16
  17. 17. Buyer Behavior • If you treat your suppliers as a faucet, and turn them on and off with  frequency, one day…they won’t turn back on • Buying wood is a long‐term partnership – both parties need to act like  a partner for long‐term success • Just because your corporate accountant wants to “zero out the pile”  does not make it a good idea • Fill in the blank: • Stable buying behavior contributes to stable prices • Unstable buying behavior contributes to __________ prices 17
  18. 18. Investor Perception • Unlike many (most) other commodities, there isn’t open and transparent  price discovery and hedging for wood • Oil, natural gas, corn, soybeans, etc. all are traded openly • There are very good indexes (e.g., Forest2Market), but that’s different • Wood pricing is very local • “Lumber prices are set globally, sawlog prices are set locally” • Issues with long‐term contracting • Landowners don’t have the ability to provide harvest guarantees • Loggers don’t own (enough) land to guarantee raw material • Even if solved, higher‐value products drive harvesting decisions • Even with all of this, projects get built, wood arrives, products are made  every day in thousands of mills across America • A good understanding of wood supply and dynamics goes a long way  18
  19. 19. Market vs Formula Pricing • For a project in the Northeast, a developer asked me to look at  market price vs a known formula. • Formula started at market price, with escalation using CPI and annual  diesel adjustment assuming 2.1 gallons per delivered ton • Back‐cast for 21 years (ran starting in 1996, ending in 2017) • Would be better to do into the future, but we don’t know future data set… • Over that time period, market and formula totals were nearly  identical • Some years win on formula, some years win on market • Over 21 years, difference of less than 1 percent • $257,000 on $37,000,000 in feedstock cost • In short, no advantage over time going one way or another 19
  20. 20. Biomass Price ‐ $ per Green Ton, Delivered 20  $‐  $5.00  $10.00  $15.00  $20.00  $25.00  $30.00  $35.00  $40.00  $45.00 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Market Formula
  21. 21. 21 ($400,000) ($300,000) ($200,000) ($100,000) $0 $100,000 $200,000 $300,000 $400,000 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Formula Savings
  22. 22. Supply Infrastructure is Critical • In many places, wood is not the limiting factor – the  ability to get wood in a truck delivered is the limiting  factor • Logging workforce shrinking, but not clear logging  production is shrinking • Serious concerns around the “next generation” of  loggers • Under current pricing, biomass NEEDS a healthy solid  wood market
  23. 23. Why Projects Will Be Built Here 23
  24. 24. The Wood 24
  25. 25. The Markets 25
  26. 26. I would like to add you to my email list Send an email to kingsley@inrsllc.com to be placed on our monthly email list, which provides information  on markets and developments of interest to the Northeast’s forestry community.  
  27. 27. Eric Kingsley Innovative Natural Resource Solutions LLC Phone 207‐233‐9910 Email kingsley@inrsllc.com 28

×