2008
                            2008
       FBI Campaign Report
“Think Beyond the Special Agent” Campaign




           ...
1
Contents
Overview
Introduction to the AdCats Agency……………………………………………...3
Executive Summary……………………………………………………………....4
Our...
The AdCats Agency
       T   he AdCats Agency is a small, student-based organization, formed to serve the FBI
           C...
Executive Summary

A    s the primary investigative arm of the
     federal government, the Federal Bureau of
Investigatio...
Our Approach
        2-Pronged Approach to Fulfilling our Objectives
        We’ve taken a two-pronged approach in develop...
Research
Methodology

Pre-campaign and target market research was conducted using surveys as a research
tool. There were 1...
Target Market Insight #1: Demographic & Psychographic Implications

Based on our “Fields of Study” statistics, the most po...
Target Market Insight #3: Knowledge & Awareness of FBI Jobs

Generally, people were highly underexposed to information abo...
Target Market Insight #4: Perception of FBI Jobs & Government Jobs

       Thirty one percent of those surveyed said that ...
Building Blocks
                               Key Consumer Insight
                               People are blinded by p...
Campaign Strategy & Implementation
Objectives

Our objectives were to influence people between the ages of 18 to 24 years ...
Positioning

We’ve enabled a position of educating applicants. There is a severe lack of knowledge
within our target marke...
Message

“Discover the possibilities at www.fbijobs.gov” is the message, and is found on all of
our advertisements. It als...
Campaign Event


Working in conjunction with New York University’s Wasserman Center for Career
Development and the Women i...
Public Relations
 Objectives

 Our objectives for our public relations strategy was to increase NYU undergraduate
 student...
NYU On-Campus Initiatives

NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development




New York University’s Wasserman Center
is open ...
Support Media & Posters

Three hundred flyers were put up in five of the largest upperclassmen dormitories:
Broome Street,...
18
Lit Up! Blog

Lit Up! is the official blog of the Women in Communications club (WIC) at NYU. Lit
Up! covers events and sto...
CollegeNews.com


Collegenews.com is a
publication of Boston Hannah
International and is written by
college students and r...
Advertising
Objective

Our creative objective was to evoke a positive reaction from the target market through
the use of e...
Creative

Five advertisements and one event flyer were created (see page 14 for event flyer). Each
one entails the message...
Traditional Advertising Initiatives

Washington Square News

Washington Square News is NYU’s daily news publication, which...
Budget
Objectives

The budget department sought to efficiently and effectively allocate resources for the
duration of the ...
Results
  POST CAMPAIGN RESEARCH                                                  Pre-Campaign Data       Post-Campaign Da...
Campaign Event Photos
                              FBI Information Panel Event
                                   Novembe...
Appendix 1: Target Market Research Data Charts

Fields of Study/Degree                                          What mediu...
25 People Have Been Exposed to FBI Ads                 Knowledge of Career Opportunities with FBI




                    ...
Appendix 2: Campaign/Media Schedule




                29
Appendix 3: Pre-Launch Press Release




For Immediate Release                                                            ...
Appendix 4: Post-Launch Press Release




For Immediate Release                                                           ...
Appendix 5: Lit Up! Blog Articles




          32
Appendix 6: CollegeNews.com Article




               33
Appendix 7: Creative




      34
35
36
37
38
Appendix 8: Washington Square News Online




                 39
Appendix 8: Washington Square News - Print




              40
41
42
43
44
45
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

FBI HR Marketing Campaign Report

3,114 views

Published on

As a part of Jacob Jacoby's Advertising Management course, my class created an ad agency called AdCats. Our client and focus for the semester was the FBI.

Our challenge was to increase the number of competitive candidates for professional staff positions, and increase awareness and consideration within our target market of these opportunities. By focusing on these specific marketing objectives, we designed and implemented our own unique marketing campaign for the FBI over the course of four months.

Published in: Business, Education
0 Comments
5 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,114
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
20
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
87
Comments
0
Likes
5
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

FBI HR Marketing Campaign Report

  1. 1. 2008 2008 FBI Campaign Report “Think Beyond the Special Agent” Campaign Tiffany ADCATS AGENCY [Type the company name] NEW YORK UNIVERSITY 1/1/2008
  2. 2. 1
  3. 3. Contents Overview Introduction to the AdCats Agency……………………………………………...3 Executive Summary……………………………………………………………....4 Our Approach…………………………………………………………………….. 5 Research Methodology and Sample…………………………………………………….…6 Target Market Insights……………………………………………………….......7 Building Blocks: Support for Campaign Strategy……………………………10 Campaign Strategy & Implementation Objectives………………………………………………………………………..11 Target Audience…………………………………………………………………11 Campaign Position………………………………………………………………12 Slogan, Message, Tagline and Tactics………………..………………………13 Campaign Event…………………………………………………………………14 Public Relations Objectives……………………………………………………………………….. 15 PR Strategy ………………………………………...……………………………15 On-Campus Tactics…………………………………………………………….. 16 Online Tactics…………………………………………………………………… 17 Advertising Objectives………………………………………………………………………..21 Ad Strategy………………………………………………………………………21 Creative…………………………………………………………………………..22 Advertising Tactics……………………………………………………………...23 Budget………………………………………………………………24 Results ……………………………………………………………...25 Photos……………………………………………………………....26 Appendix…………………………………………………………...27 2
  4. 4. The AdCats Agency T he AdCats Agency is a small, student-based organization, formed to serve the FBI Collegiate Marketing & Recruitment Program. Based in New York City, the team is comprised of New York University students performing under the direction of Professor Jacob Jacoby and his Advertising Management course. Together with Edventure Partners, the AdCats Agency offers full service support for the FBI’s local marketing of their professional staff opportunities. The AdCats Team Account Creative Public Production Finance Research Management Relations Allison Wile Meika Justin Jin Yun Bonilla Kun Creative Hollander Zhang Tiffany Chang Research Director PR Production Account Director Finance Manager Director Director Deanna Director Ferrante- Gomez Fernando Balino James Gaskill Daniel McCoy Kristina Erica Swallow Carberry Account Manager Brent Davis Soo Eun Park Jiana Paladino Erik Westphal Rogelio Sam Howard Plasencia Gelyn Teofilo Sabina Tracey Sobinina Svenningsen Caroline Tseng Randy Reiser Robert Wright 3
  5. 5. Executive Summary A s the primary investigative arm of the federal government, the Federal Bureau of Investigation is one of the most well-respected and sophisticated intelligence agencies. Comprised of a diverse range of professions, the FBI offers special agent career opportunities as well as professional staff positions. The FBI is focusing recruitment efforts on individuals with critical skills and experience in various areas including intelligence, foreign language, computer science and engineering. Our Challenge Our challenge was to increase the number of competitive candidates for professional staff positions, and increase awareness and consideration within our target market of these opportunities. By focusing on these specific marketing objectives, we designed and implemented our own unique marketing campaign for the FBI over the course of four months. Functioning as a full-service advertising agency, we researched, strategized and repositioned the professional staff brand image. By fielding studies before, during and after the campaign launch, we gained vital target market insights that informed our campaign strategy and development. Both public relations and advertising divisions engaged traditional as well as non traditional marketing mediums into our mix, to deliver material and awareness through print and online. Total impressions were generated through newspaper advertising, posters and flyers around campus and in academic departments, promotions by clubs and academic departments, social network sites, co-sponsorships, and an event. 4
  6. 6. Our Approach 2-Pronged Approach to Fulfilling our Objectives We’ve taken a two-pronged approach in developing our campaign. Consumer attitudes are changing every day and simply releasing advertising is no longer enough. We wanted to build a message, but more importantly, build a brand and an experience that our target market will remember and act on. CREATE ADVERTISEMENTS CREATE FBI AND PR EVENTS FANS/ADMIRERS OBJECTIVE: Increase awareness and the OBJECTIVE: Get students and target market to number of applicants start thinking of the FBI in the foreground, rather than the background…and ultimately become a top career choice IN PUBLIC IN LIVES Catch attention, saturate the environment with Create valuable content that will show that the FBI our ads, make people think, “I want to apply!” is relevant to their lives; they’ll become brand fans TARGET FOCUS TARGET FOCUS Key Location: NYU campus Key People: Target Market 5
  7. 7. Research Methodology Pre-campaign and target market research was conducted using surveys as a research tool. There were 17 questions on the questionnaire, and is a combination of all of the questions found on the original research template provided by the client and Edventure Partners, as well as original agency-generated questions. Over the course of a week, our research team conducted interviews with a random sample of 167 people within our target market, using this survey. Answers generated were analyzed for their quantitative and qualitative insights into the current market environment. Key findings were also used to determine our strengths and weaknesses and our brand opportunity. See Appendix 1 for target market research data charts (pg. 27) The Sample  167 people were surveyed randomly  46% Male, 54% Female  87% US citizen (22% non-US citizen)  Age: - 17-20 years old: 40% - 21-24 years old: 56% - 25-28 years old: 4%  Ethnic Background - Caucasians: 88% - Asians: 46% - Hispanic/Latino: 11% - African-American: 7% - Other: 13% 6
  8. 8. Target Market Insight #1: Demographic & Psychographic Implications Based on our “Fields of Study” statistics, the most popular majors that would be of interest to our campaign are:  Accounting/Finance  Sciences (Physics, chemistry, math, biology, nursing, forensics)  International Studies  Foreign Language Roughly less than half of respondents were fluent in another language (mainly Research Recommendations Spanish, Chinese, and Hindi); 80% of  Emphasize leveraging foreign these languages are those highly coveted language skills for a meaningful job by the FBI. with the government. The most frequented campus locations  Use emails, buzz marketing, print are: advertisements and Facebook to  Dorms reach the audience.  Bobst Library  Washington Square Park  Kimmel Center for Student Life The best means to reach our audience is by email, word of mouth, posters/flyers. Target Market Insight #2: Perception of Jobs & the Job Market Overall, job seekers think it is difficult to find a job in the current market. The best places to reach these people are either Research Recommendations online, on university or job websites, or at on-campus career fairs. They seem to be  Emphasize the ease of using the most interested in salary, job security, and FBI’s website. advancement opportunities over other benefits. Finally, job seekers find it  Emphasize salary, job security and advancement opportunities. important to feel that the work they do makes a difference in the world.  Emphasize that working for the FBI will make a difference in the world. 7
  9. 9. Target Market Insight #3: Knowledge & Awareness of FBI Jobs Generally, people were highly underexposed to information about job opportunities in the FBI.  91% of those surveyed never heard of the website, www.fbijobs.gov  96% of those surveyed have never spoken with an FBI recruiter  25 people have been exposed to FBI advertising Most people said they received ad exposure via television. Because the FBI does not advertise on television, the target market is highly exposed to the FBI image portrayed on television shows and movies, rather than through other mediums. This causes misconceptions. Eighty-seven percent did indeed believe that the mass media causes misconceptions about the FBI. People typically think of the FBI as field agents who work undercover in dangerous situations. While 25 viewers claimed to have been exposed to actual FBI advertisements, only nine have ever visited the website. Email is the best way to reach this target market about job opportunities; email advertising seems to have the most potential. Only one person has been exposed to FBI advertising online. People were overall uninformed. When asked if they know how to look for a job in the FBI, 86% said no. Entering “FBI job” as a search term on Google returns an immediate link to the www.fbijobs.gov web page. While it is this easy to find information about FBI jobs online, people are not motivated to do so. FBI is not turning up in their evoked set of career options. Research Recommendations  Advertising’s ultimate goal should be to direct the viewer to the website, where there is a wealth of information  Email advertising seems to have the most potential.  Present relate-able human models in advertising  Follow up campaigns with on-site recruiters, to drive ubiquitous presence of marketing 8
  10. 10. Target Market Insight #4: Perception of FBI Jobs & Government Jobs Thirty one percent of those surveyed said that the FBI limits an individual’s career. Fifty percent of those surveyed did not want to work for the government because of low salaries, lack of advancement opportunities, lack of creativity, bad associations with the government, lack of privacy, and lack of excitement. Most of these perceptions do not necessarily pertain to FBI professional staff job characteristics. Therefore, we tried to change these perceptions by communicating that there is a decent salary, room for advancement, travel opportunities, creativity, and excitement. Most people have never considered a career with the FBI, so we needed to communicate all of the different positions that are available and why they may be more beneficial than private sector occupations. The people who have considered FBI as an employer did so between the ages of 13-17 years old, after seeing images of special agents on television or in the movies. Some people consider the FBI to be exciting, which is a great attribute, but tied in with many misconceptions and pigeonholed to a narrow image of the special agent. Forty-eight percent of those surveyed believed that there are negative qualities associated with the FBI. Such qualities include danger, risk of death, low salary and confidentiality; these factors discourage applicants from applying. A lot of people are hesitant about applying for FBI positions, even if they know they are qualified for the job. Thirty-four percent claimed that even if they saw a position that they were interested in and were qualified for, they would not likely apply for the job. This may be due to the risk factors associated with this line of work, and so we needed to communicate the broad spectrum of job opportunities in the agency that are not dangerous. Most people did not find that government jobs would limit their career any more than a non-government job, but they still would not choose to apply for FBI positions. The number of people who did not find that a job in the FBI would be more limited than another career thought so because of low salaries, lack of promotions, and the confidentiality factor. 9
  11. 11. Building Blocks Key Consumer Insight People are blinded by pop culture’s interpretation and representation of the FBI. Instead of professional staff job opportunities and a stable career path, some think only of special agents. Others associate the job with high levels of danger and the promotion of unpopular government policies. However, in a time of great change and uncertainty in which previously trusted companies have fallen, consumers may place a greater value on the relative safety and comfort of a career with the FBI, sacrificing a more prestigious or financially rewarding position. Education Since the consumer insights yielded significant misconceptions about the FBI, the market must be educated about the very existence of staff positions, along with the number of benefits that they entail. Students must be made aware of the broader context of the FBI and start to consider it as a launch pad for careers. This includes changing preconceived notions about the government, the FBI, and particularly, special agents. Benefit The FBI offers a number of benefits: job security, career advancement, health care and retirement benefits, relocation opportunities, and much more. Reason to Believe/Support The benefits that the FBI offers are among the top priorities of job seekers. Students are challenged by the current economic climate, and are looking for a position and company that they can believe in. 10
  12. 12. Campaign Strategy & Implementation Objectives Our objectives were to influence people between the ages of 18 to 24 years old with a coveted skill set to visit the FBI employment website (www.fbijobs.gov) and to apply for jobs. We wanted to increase the market awareness of the variety of professional staff opportunities, and to shed the “special agent” image. Target Audience The target market was comprised of college students between the ages of 18- 24 years old with a wide range of majors, including: engineering, accounting/finance, language, Islamic studies, physical sciences, computer engineering, computer science, and information technology. They must also be United States citizens, be able to pass a background check, be amenable to a one-year commitment, and cannot ever have been convicted of felony. In order to appeal to candidates with the above qualifications, we focused our campaign efforts toward students at New York University. Applicants who are interested in professional staff positions will likely be willing to look past any perceived shortcomings of working in the public sector, and to sacrifice the most competitive salary level in exchange for the FBI’s many benefits. Such benefits include job security, flexible work hours, health care and retirement benefits, and advancement opportunities. 11
  13. 13. Positioning We’ve enabled a position of educating applicants. There is a severe lack of knowledge within our target market not only about the FBI in general, but also about the availability and range of their professional staff job opportunities. Qualified applicants who are aware of job openings are not interested because they harbor misconceptions most likely developed from the media. We wanted to reposition FBI professional staff careers as exciting experiences and advantageous opportunities. We wanted to increase its value in the consumer’s mind, make it a primary option in the target’s evoked set when considering career choices, and ultimately, bring the image of the professional staff to the foreground while distinguishing it from the special agent representation. By focusing on the specific characteristics and benefits offered through a professional staff career path, our campaign has sought to own and emphasize a position of attributes and benefits. The various professional staff characteristics that we highlight in our advertisements challenge the popularized special agent image, and pave the way to changing preconceived notions about the FBI. Our campaign additionally positions an educative call to action, by directing job seekers to the website, www.fbijobs.gov, for more information on the range of occupations as well as on how to apply. Ideal Consumer Response At the launch of our campaign, we hoped for an ideal response in which a student who was previously unaware of professional staff career options would be made aware through our advertising and public relations. After learning about professional staff positions, the student would ideally take into consideration the job security and various benefits available, and submit an application through the FBI jobs website. 12
  14. 14. Message “Discover the possibilities at www.fbijobs.gov” is the message, and is found on all of our advertisements. It also serves as a call to action and directs traffic and attention to the application/information page. Slogan The slogan of the campaign is “Think Beyond the Special Agent.” It implies that there are alternative professions to the special agent position within the FBI, all offering the same key benefits that job seekers look for. Tagline The tagline is “I can’t [insert agent-related skill], but I can [insert staff-related skill].” The tagline is tailored to each advertisement’s featured profession and skill, followed by a body copy of “[blank] is one profession career offering: competitive salary, advancement opportunities, job security, health and retirement benefits.” Campaign Tactics & Media Mix The campaign tactics that were implemented highlighted key attributes such as job security, career advancement, health care and retirement benefits, relocation opportunities, and competitive salary. Our campaign reiterated that FBI offers benefits that are among the top priorities of job seekers. Our media mix included print ads, posters, flyers, online social network sites, campus newspapers, campus events, blogs, email, and word of mouth. We advertised in the campus newspaper, the online university news site, through list-serves, and in prime locations such as the student center and career center. We saturated the market with advertising through all the channels that our target audience utilizes or is exposed to everyday. By partnering with select vehicles that have already secured credibility and trust with the audience, our campaign effectively obtained positive reactions. Campaign/Media schedule See Appendix 2 for full image of media schedule (pg. 29) 13
  15. 15. Campaign Event Working in conjunction with New York University’s Wasserman Center for Career Development and the Women in Communications Club, we held an informational panel event. Featuring five professional staff members from different departments and a special agent, this event brought education and awareness to the target market directly. The panel was moderated by AdCats Agency account manager, Tiffany Chang, and included welcoming remarks by special agent Kescha Wilson of the New York office. Over twenty students attended. Photos were taken by visiting Edventure Partners representative, Shannon Conlon, and AdCats Agency account manager, Erica Swallow. See page 26 for photos from the event. 14
  16. 16. Public Relations Objectives Our objectives for our public relations strategy was to increase NYU undergraduate student awareness of the FBI professional staff job opportunities, and to present a relatable image that departs from the special agent stereotype. Strategy Considering our target audience is NYU students, we strategically implemented our public relations and advertising activities to mediums and areas that would reach our target audience on campus or in their dorms, and would ensure definite exposure. Based on recommendations that the research team drew from preliminary research, we incorporated viral and electronic marketing into our media mix. We tapped into social network sites, academic departments’, club and career center email list-serves, and a club blog. In addition to these publicity endeavors, story coverage was pitched to both online and offline news vehicles, and advertising ran in both print and electronic versions of the campus newspaper. All of these outlets work closely with our target market, and have already secured a sense of credibility and trust with the consumer. Tactics Tactics include press releases, an event, and viral marketing. Press Releases Press releases were submitted to both traditional and non-traditional news vehicles, such as the campus newspaper, www.collegenews.com, and NYU’s Women in Communications Club’s online blog, Lit Up! See Appendix 3 and 4 for press releases (pg. 30-31). 15
  17. 17. NYU On-Campus Initiatives NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development New York University’s Wasserman Center is open to all undergraduate students and provides students with career guidance and job opportunities. The Wasserman Center assists an average of 2,000 students each month. The Wasserman Center sent out an email blast with our flyer attached, on the Monday (November 17) before our event to all students registered with them. Flyers and advertisements were also put up in the center. On-Campus Panel Event with FBI Professional Staff See page 14. 16
  18. 18. Support Media & Posters Three hundred flyers were put up in five of the largest upperclassmen dormitories: Broome Street, Lafayette, Carlyle Court, Palladium, and Water Street. With an approximate total of 6,000 upperclassmen students residing in these dorms, the number of impressions generated over a 10-day period claims a successful value of 18,000,000. Online Initiatives Facebook Social network site www.facebook.com was a valuable media outlet for our campaign. The majority of the target market accesses Facebook on a daily basis, and Facebook specification allowed for a specified penetration in the NYU community. We built a group page for FBI Professional Support Opportunities on Facebook, open only to the NYU network. As an open group on the NYU network, anyone from NYU can join and invite others from NYU to join. Currently, 92 NYU students are members. The events communication tool allowed us to create an invitation to the on-campus event and publicize it to the group members. All advertisements were uploaded in the “photos” section, and we provided a link to the FBI jobs website under the “posted” items section. The page can be accessed at: http://www.facebook.com/inbox/?ref=mb#/group.php?gid=33452937900 17
  19. 19. 18
  20. 20. Lit Up! Blog Lit Up! is the official blog of the Women in Communications club (WIC) at NYU. Lit Up! covers events and stories of local interest, media commentary and editorials, and is overall a prime source informing NYU students of current events. Lit Up! has two posts on the FBI campaign and the on-campus event. While there is no counter to keep track of page hits, the blog is made public and can be found through search engines, thus inducing high potential impressions. The blog can be accessed at www.wiclitup.wordpress.com. See Appendix 5 for full articles (pg. 32) 19
  21. 21. CollegeNews.com Collegenews.com is a publication of Boston Hannah International and is written by college students and recent graduates. The site gathers daily news and relevant information concerning college students and young people, and promotes its content as a premier source for college students. This online news site covered our campaign efforts. See Appendix 6 for full article (pg. 33) Email List-Serves & Word of Mouth Not only did we reach out to our target audience through the Wasserman Center emails, we were able to specifically target students through academic department list- serves and club emails. Campaign advertisements and event flyers were promoted through this channel. Academic department list-serves were targeted for their language studies, as the FBI seeks linguistic skills in candidates. List-Serve Impressions NYU Clubs 1,775 German Studies Department 19 East Asian Studies Department 48 French Department 400 20
  22. 22. Advertising Objective Our creative objective was to evoke a positive reaction from the target market through the use of effective copy and visual advertisements. Strategy The FBI ads needed to have a combination of rational and emotional appeals, strong execution and quality production. Appeals  Informational/rational appeal when discussing job benefits  Transformational advertising to associate a positive feeling of success or self-actualization with working for the FBI  Emotional integration—we wanted the subjects of the ads to demonstrate some sort of emotional benefit or outcome Execution  Our approach is a straight sell/factual message and one-lined testimonial  Headlines are indirect, so as to provoke a challenge for the audience and to get people to read the body copy  Body copy is straight-sell of information Tonality  Informative  Self-actualizing  Eye-opening  Promising 21
  23. 23. Creative Five advertisements and one event flyer were created (see page 14 for event flyer). Each one entails the message line “Discover the Possibilities at www.fbijobs.gov.” Four ads feature different staff opportunities with tailored statements saying “I can’t do [insert agent-related skill], but I can do [insert staff-related skill].” Each one also consists of body copy that outlines the benefits that accompany such a profession. One overarching ad incorporates models from the other four individual ads, and directly states the slogan, “Think Beyond the Special Agent.” This advertisement too has the message line included at the bottom. An online banner ad was also created, providing straight sell of information, the message and the slogan. See Appendix 7 for full size images of advertisements (pg. 34) 22
  24. 24. Traditional Advertising Initiatives Washington Square News Washington Square News is NYU’s daily news publication, which reaches all types of NYU students throughout the various disciplines and departments at the university. Students are able to obtain a copy of the Washington Square News at various locations around campus, as well as in all dorms, at no cost. An estimated 250,000 readership is considered per issue, making this medium an incredibly viable venue for our campaign. Two press releases, pre and post launch, were submitted for story coverage. While WSN did not pick up the feature, they did run our advertisements for five issues. Advertisements were three inches by eight inches in size, and contracted for publication at a price of $1,000. This negotiation also included a discounted online banner at the price of $500, placed on their online news site, www.nyunews.com. With a circulation of 25,000, the total reach was 75,000. Calculating in the frequency of five issues, our total gross impressions for print advertising was 375,000. The online advertising package allowed us to purchase a time period in which to advertise, and the banner stayed online until the guaranteed number of 140,000 impressions had been met. See Appendix 8 for advertisements in WSN and online (pg. 39) On-Campus As previously stated, advertisements in the form of support media (flyers and posters) were distributed and posted in buildings on campus and in dormitories. Online Advertising Initiatives In conjunction with public relations efforts, advertisements were circulated online through Washington Square News, Facebook, email list-serves, and the blog, Lit Up! 23
  25. 25. Budget Objectives The budget department sought to efficiently and effectively allocate resources for the duration of the campaign, maintain accurate records of all campaign values and expenditures, and to report accurate cost versus value figures at the culmination of the campaign. Cost vs. Value Added Proposed Budget Allocation Estimated Estimated Actual Actual Cost Value Cost Value Thank You Letters (CPO, MSM, Event, $4.61 $4.61 $4.61 $4.61 Final) Public Relations Expense $4.61 $4.61 $4.61 $4.61 Posters $218.86 $218.86 $218.86 $218.86 Flyers $123.75 $123.75 $123.75 $123.75 Newspaper Advertisements $1000 $1680 $1500 $1680 Web-site Advertisements $500 $1050 $500 $1050 Photo Shoot $63.59 $63.59 $63.59 $63.59 Advertising Expense $1906.20 $3136.20 $1906.20 $3136.20 Catering/Food $332.25 $332.25 $332.25 $332.25 Campaign Implementation $332.25 $332.25 $332.25 $332.25 Expense Final Report $221.95 $221.95 $221.95 $221.95 Folders for Client $8.12 $8.12 $8.12 $8.12 Campaign Reporting Expense $239.60 $239.60 $239.60 $239.60 Total Campaign Cost $2482.66 $2482.66 Total Campaign Value $3712.66 $3712.66 NET VALUE $1230 $1230 $1230 $1230 Our net value was $1230.00. We spent $2482.66 out of the total budget of $2500.00. 24
  26. 26. Results POST CAMPAIGN RESEARCH Pre-Campaign Data Post-Campaign Data  97 people surveyed in post Heard of Website? Yes: 9% Yes: 19% campaign research www.fbijobs.gov No: 91% No: 81% - 59% Female, 41% Male Spoke with FBI Recruiter? Yes: 4% Yes: 4% - 85% U.S. citizen No: 96% No: 96% - 44% were between the Exposed to FBI Ad? Yes: 15% Yes: 40% ages of 17-20 No: 85% No: 60% - 56% were between the ages of 21-24 years old Knowledge of Career Don’t Know: 29% Don’t Know: 27% Opportunities in FBI Poor: 52% Poor: 43%  32 people saw an FBI ad on Fair: 16% Fair: 21% campus (41% through Good: 3% Good: 9% Washington Square News, 50% through posters and First word when you 1. Agent 6. Secret flyers, 9% through email) hear, “FBI” 2. Secret 7. Government  50% were exposed to an ad 3. Federal 8. Agent two to three times, 41% were 4. Police 9. Federal exposed just once. (6% were 5. Crime 10. Police exposed four to ten times, and 3% were exposed more than If qualified, would you Likely: 27% Likely: 28% ten times) apply? Not Likely: 36% Not Likely: 51% Those NOT Reached Those Reached through Fourty-four (44%) percent of through AdCats’ Ads those surveyed claimed they AdCats’ Ads learned something new. The First word when 1. Secret 6. Government most common answers were: you hear, “FBI” 2. Government 7. Police 1. FBI has job opportunities; 3. Agent 8. Law 4. Federal 9. Secret 2. FBI is recruiting college 5. Police 10. Investigations graduates; 3. Professional staff Knowledge of Don’t Know: 15% Don’t Know: 9% opportunities exist. FBI Poor: 62% Poor: 47% After the campaign, the If qualified, Likely: 25% Likely: 32% percentage of those who heard of would you Not Likely: 57% Not Likely: 34% apply? the website www.fbijobs.gov more than doubled, and “good” and “fair” knowledge of FBI career opportunities increased by 5-6%. Whereas the pre-campaign data found that people primarily associated the word “agent” with the FBI, post-campaign data shows that “agent” is no longer the primary conjured image. Furthermore, after our campaign, more people have claimed to be likely to apply if they qualified for the FBI. 25
  27. 27. Campaign Event Photos FBI Information Panel Event November 19, 2008 Kimmel Center for Student Life A table was set up in the lobby of the Kimmel Center, where the event was taking place. AdCats Agency account manager Tiffany Chang moderated the panel discussion. The event featured five professional staff members and Special Agent Kescha Wilson. 26
  28. 28. Appendix 1: Target Market Research Data Charts Fields of Study/Degree What medium is best to reach you? To what resources would you refer if/when seeking a job? Majority of Time Spent on Campus 3 Most Important Aspects When Choosing a Job How important is it that your job has meaning and makes a difference in the world? 27
  29. 29. 25 People Have Been Exposed to FBI Ads Knowledge of Career Opportunities with FBI First Thing that Comes to Mind when You Hear “FBI” If you saw a position that you were interested in and qualified for, how likely would you be to apply for a position within the FBI? 28
  30. 30. Appendix 2: Campaign/Media Schedule 29
  31. 31. Appendix 3: Pre-Launch Press Release For Immediate Release CONTACT: October 27, 2008 Meika Hollender Public Relations Director Mjh359@nyu.edu – 802.999.8734 NYU Students Break the Pop Culture FBI Image with their “Think Beyond the Special Agent” Campaign In Professor Jacob Jacoby’s Advertising Management class, textbooks are hard to find. Hired by the FBI through Edventure Partners, an organization that assigns students to a company or organization in order to create a ―real world‖ marketing experience, Jacoby’s class is diving headfirst into the world of advertising. Divided into various departments, including Account Management, Marketing Research, Media & PR, Creative, Production and Budget, the class has three months to create and execute a multifaceted campaign targeted at NYU undergraduates. The FBI, popularly misrepresented with the solo ―special agent jacket‖ image, hopes to educate NYU students about the OTHER professional staff opportunities within the FBI. They figured there was no better way than recruiting NYU students to create the messages behind their advertising campaign. Jacoby’s class has created a series of original advertisements in order to reposition the FBI in the minds of students as a feasible career choice and to build awareness about the FBI’s professional staff positions, which include options such as intelligence analysts, linguists, lab technicians and surveillance analysts. Over the next two months, posters, flyers, online placements and one major on-campus event will help educate NYU students about the ―other side‖ of the FBI. Held in late November, the on-campus event will feature FBI professional staff employees who will speak about their experiences and the benefits of working with the FBI. Recruiters are looking for applicants from a long list of disciplines—some include engineering, foreign languages, linguistics, computer science, and finance. Look out for original FBI Professional Staff ads created by Professor Jacoby’s class in the Washington Square News, as well as in Bobst Library and the Kimmel Center, and stay tuned for more information about the November FBI information session. For more information about FBI job opportunities please visit: www.fbijobs.gov. ### 30
  32. 32. Appendix 4: Post-Launch Press Release For Immediate Release CONTACT: December 1, 2008 Meika Hollender Public Relations Director Mjh359@nyu.edu – 802.999.8734 NYU Students Break the Pop Culture FBI Image with their “Think Beyond the Special Agent” Campaign In Professor Jacob Jacoby’s Advertising Management class, textbooks are hard to find. Hired by the FBI through Edventure Partners, an organization that assigns students to a company or organization in order to create a ―real world‖ marketing experience, Jacoby’s class dove headfirst into the world of advertising. Divided into various departments, including Account Management, Marketing Research, Media & PR, Creative, Production and Budget, over the past three months the class successfully executed a multifaceted campaign targeted at NYU undergraduates. The FBI, popularly misrepresented with the solo ―special agent jacket‖ image, hopes to educate NYU students about the OTHER professional staff opportunities within the FBI. They figured there was no better way than recruiting NYU students to create the messages behind their advertising campaign. Jacoby’s class has created a series of original advertisements in order to reposition the FBI in the minds of students as a feasible career choice and to build awareness about the FBI’s professional staff positions, which include options such as intelligence analysts, linguists, lab technicians and surveillance analysts. Over the past two months, posters, flyers, online placements and one major on-campus event will helped to educate NYU students about the ―other side‖ of the FBI. On November 19, the class hosted an on-campus event where FBI professional staff employees spoke about their experiences and the benefits of working with the FBI. Many interested students with a wide range of majors attended the event. After the event, on student said, ―I had no idea there was this other side of the FBI, and since I am a biology major, I am thrilled to know that working with the FBI is an option!‖ Continue to look out for original FBI Professional Staff ads created by Professor Jacoby’s class in the Washington Square News and at nyu.news.com, as well as in the upperclassmen dorms. For more information about FBI job opportunities please visit: www.fbijobs.gov. ### 31
  33. 33. Appendix 5: Lit Up! Blog Articles 32
  34. 34. Appendix 6: CollegeNews.com Article 33
  35. 35. Appendix 7: Creative 34
  36. 36. 35
  37. 37. 36
  38. 38. 37
  39. 39. 38
  40. 40. Appendix 8: Washington Square News Online 39
  41. 41. Appendix 8: Washington Square News - Print 40
  42. 42. 41
  43. 43. 42
  44. 44. 43
  45. 45. 44
  46. 46. 45

×