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Micro teaching and exploring community resources

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Micro teaching and exploring community resources

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Micro teaching and exploring community resources

  1. 1. Micro-teaching & Community Resources
  2. 2. Micro-teaching
  3. 3. Background Microteaching consists of teaching a brief lesson to a small group of students in an actual classroom. It is often resorted to during student-teacher’s practicum before going out for off-campus teaching. Beginning teachers likewise undertake this learning activity by teaching their peers. In addition to gaining experience in teaching, the opportunity to observe ones own performance for purpose of analysing and evaluating teaching knowledge and skills is considered of great value.
  4. 4. Rationale The ultimate aim in microteaching is to obtain feedback from the students or peers. Feedback may be in the form of a critique on how the lesson’s objective was achieved, the mannerism observed, if any, and the expressions that may have been repeated too often.
  5. 5. Diagramatic representation of a Micro-teaching Cycle
  6. 6. Effectiveness The feedback must be followed by a reflection, that is, look back at why or how such teaching performance progressed the way it did. This step will determine whether this strategy is effective or not. A successful and productive microteaching session is considered a more focused and down-to-earth way of learning than other teaching techniques. For best viewing, critiquing and recording the whole proceedings, audio visual equipment will be needed such as video camera, camera, tape recorder, overhead projector and wide screen. Assistance in using them must be secured ahead of time.
  7. 7. Guidelines: 1. Microteaching is the most effective with groups of 4-6 members, be it for students or peers. 2. The lesson should be brief but complete, requiring about 12-15 minutes. 3. Feedback should be honest and straight to the point. The performers are ready to listen and accept peer’s evaluation. 4. The special equipment needed must be prepared ahead of time. Blank tapes may be needed for own records. 5. Since feedback is crucial in this learning activity, the oral and written mode may be employed.
  8. 8. Guidelines 6. If critique will be required from the students, they must be instructed how such can be expressed and recorded. 7. Practice lessons may be viewed over and over to obtain accurate feedback.
  9. 9. Exploring Community Resources
  10. 10. Background Using community resources as a strategy involves familiarization and eventually close link with all the educational aspects in it – the people and their expertise, the places with rich instructional materials and the natural landscape. Teachers can take advantage of the abundant sources of first hand materials that can make the teaching-learning process spontaneous and natural. All learning activities will necessarily take the students out of the classroom, although some materials from outside can be carried to the classroom or laboratory for further study. Interview with agriculture experts, doctors, historians and business men in the community gather first hand information that are readily available. The community health clinic, orchard, plant nursery, natural ponds are likewise potential resources. Learning is facilitated through actual contact with human and material resources.
  11. 11. Effectiveness 1. The use of community resources is commendable strategy which brings the school close to the community it serves and vice versa. 2. The knowledge and experience gained by exploring and investigating things in their natural settings are guaranteed to be more permanent and lasting compared to those learned from printed pages. 3. Educational trips to the community in a more meaningful ,practical and enjoyable learning. 4. The students become more appreciative, grateful and proud of their rich resources. 5. Interaction between the school and community leads the students to a better understanding of the conditions obtaining in it. In the long run, they may be strongly motivated to participate actively in projects, academic or social that will redound to a reciprocal assistance for both.
  12. 12. Disadvantages 1. The hazards of traveling in big groups limit the use of this strategy. 2. Proper planning and pre-tour preparation can be time consuming 3. Difficulty in scheduling the meeting with the experts is another constraints.
  13. 13. Guidelines 1. The teacher must have a complete file of people, places and things in the community that could be tapped for specific instructional purposes. 2. The objective of this out-of-the-classroom activity must be well understood by the students in order to avoid being distracted by irrelevant and non-educational observations. 3. A note on proper behaviour will contribute immensely to the achievement of the objectives and to the safety and comfort of all. 4. The students must be involved in the selection of the site and in the planning the entire activity so that they will be guided on what to do at every step. This will likewise assist them in tracing the causes of success or failure of the activity during the evaluation time.
  14. 14. Guidelines 5. You may combine the lessons in the other subjects in this single trip, thus enriching their experiences and accumulating vast knowledge rather than tackling a single lesson. 6. When meeting authorities in the community, remind students to be courteous, respectful and warm. They are busy people and must not be disturbed unnecessarily. Remind them to show appreciation and gratitude for the time spent with them and valuable information gathered. 7. Design a Plan B for any failure of communication or last minute cancellation. Ask suggestion for alternative steps from the group. 8. Assign committees with a leader who will be responsible for the conduct of the group and can guide the group during transfers, audiences with lectures if any, and in looking after their needs and comfort. 9. Have the entire class evaluate the results of the trip according to the objective defined beforehand. Encourage them to offer recommendations to improve succeeding trips
  15. 15. Sample Community Resources Places • Plantation • Library • Museum • Art gallery • Theatre • Hospital • Parks • Factories • Bus station • Canal • Rice fields • Municipal buildings • Hill • Cultural exhibits • zoo • Market place • Convention centre • Nursery • Historic sites • Monuments • River
  16. 16. Sample Community Resources People • Mayor • Principal • Professor • Historian • Musician • Doctor • Nurse • Agriculturist • farmer • Fisherman • Policeman • Authors • Librarian
  17. 17. Prepared by: Eren Saturnino Judy lyn Cabagay

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