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Diffusion of excellence across uk foundries and metal forming firms

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Presentation by Temitope Akinremi to the Cast Metals Federation (CMF) annual award dinner.

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Diffusion of excellence across uk foundries and metal forming firms

  1. 1. Temitope.Akinremi@wbs.ac.uk Warwick Business School University of Warwick Twitter: @Temi_Akinremi Diffusion of Excellence Across UK Foundries and Metal Forming Firms Stephen Roper and Temi Akinremi
  2. 2. About The Project & Phase 1 Outcome • Project Objectives; • 1st Phase; Research Questions & Interviews  Industry perception of Innovation Collaboration, Motivation & Current Practice • Understanding of innovation and its benefits • Collaboration with SC Partners the most common innovation collaboration • Inter-firm collaboration non-existent • Knowledge about capabilities can influence the decision to collaborate • Assess to information on trustworthiness essential for collaboration Develop strategies for best practice diffusion Identify extent of adoption of practices & barriers Identify productivity improvement practices Understand productivity distribution in case-study sectors
  3. 3. Focus in Year 2 • 2nd Phase; Conducted sector survey for generalizable outcomes  Extent of adoption of innovation practices and barriers to adoption  Influence of informational market failures on innovation collaboration • 170 firms across case-study sectors; 75 Foundries , 95 Metal-Forming Firms 33 27 15 64 27 4 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 0-9 10-49 50-249 NumberofFirms Firm Size Number of Firms Interviewed by Firm Size Casting Industry Metal-Forming Industry
  4. 4. Outcome…… • Firms that innovated in the last 3 years 41% 37% 22% Percentage of Foundry Firms that Introduced New or Improved Products/Services By Size Band 0-9 10-49 50-249
  5. 5. Outcome…… • Motivation for Innovation 13.98 5.00 8.93 10.61 14.41 13.98 11.60 2.78 0.00 25.80 11.71 21.55 35.93 35.34 51.99 26.86 10.93 11.12 58.54 83.82 69.52 53.45 50.25 31.94 61.54 86.28 88.88 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Process Improvement Remaining Competitive Customer Demand Cost Reduction Stricter Standards Improving Time to Market Increasing Margins Improving H&S Improving Quality Percentage Importance of Innovation Motivation in Foundries Low Importance (%) Medium Importance (%) High Importance (%)
  6. 6. Outcome…… • Collaboration with External Partners
  7. 7. Outcome…… • Aim of Collaboration  Quality Improvement  Product Development/Improvement  Business Re-Engineering 6.1 6.1 9.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 11.1 14.8 33.3 18.5 25.9 14.8 7.4 7.4 20.0 40.0 33.3 20.0 20.0 26.7 13.3 40.0 9.6 13.7 19.9 10.1 12.3 10.0 5.9 9.8 0.0 20.0 40.0 60.0 80.0 100.0 120.0 Supply Chain Efficiency Business Re-Engineering New/Improved Products Lean Production Quality Mangement Robotics/Automation Data Connectivity Process/Product Simulation Aim of Collaboration in SME Foundries 0-9 Firmsize 10-49 Firmsize 50-249 Firmsize Total Industry SMEs
  8. 8. Outcome…… • Collaboration Partners  Most Common Collaboration; Firm-Supplier Collaboration 3.4 3.4 5.1 5.1 3.4 0.0 1.7 0.0 1.7 2.2 7.7 7.7 1.1 9.9 5.5 2.2 1.1 5.5 3.0 4.9 5.9 1.0 3.0 4.9 3.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 14.0 16.0 18.0 20.0 Firms within Enterprise Group Customers Suppliers Competitors/Firms within Sector Firms outside Industry Sector Consultants/R&D Institutes Universities/Higher Education Government/Public Research Trade Associations Percentage of Collaborating Firm CollaborationPartner Percentage of Collaboration In SME Foundries 0-9 Firmsize 10-49 Firmsize 50-249 Firmsize 9% 17% 20% 8% 18% 11% 7% 2% 8% Total Percentage of Collaboration in SME Foundries Firms within Enterprise Group Customers Suppliers Competitors/Firms within Sector Firms outside Industry Sector Consultants/R&D Institutes Universities/Higher Education Government/Public Research Trade Associations
  9. 9. Outcome…… • Barriers to Collaboration  Most Influential Barriers; Lack of Trust & Openness Insufficient Knowledge on Capability 12.4 26.0 16.4 10.3 11.1 20.6 13.2 21.0 14.4 18.5 22.3 11.9 16.5 25.8 22.8 13.5 22.9 17.9 21.6 20.6 35.2 18.8 8.2 20.6 20.3 16.8 31.0 20.5 21.5 25.3 42.6 46.4 25.4 40.1 20.9 26.7 11.8 9.5 11.2 11.8 8.4 10.6 12.9 18.3 10.1 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% New Product/Process Risk Firm Size Time Constraint Lack of Funds Lack of Trust & Openness IP Ownership/Protection Insufficienct Knowledge on Capability Corporate Culture Competitive Environment Influence (%) InnovationCollaborationBarriers Percentage Influence of Barriers to Innovation Collaboration in Foundries No Influence (%) Low Influence (%) Medium Influence (%) High Influence (%) Not Applicable (%)
  10. 10. Outcome…… • Importance of Trust & Capability Knowledge 6% 10% 13% 22% 49% Percentage Importance of Capability Knowledge in Foundries Very Unimportant (%) Unimportant (%) Neither Important nor Unimportant (%) Important (%) Very Important (%) 8% 6% 86% Percentage Importance of Trust for Collaboration in Foundries Very Unimportant (%) Unimportant Neither Important nor Unimportant (%) Important (%) Very Important (%)
  11. 11. Conclusion • Less than half of foundries introduced new products/services in the last 3 years • Foundries are motivated to innovate to remain competitive, and for quality improvements • Innovation collaboration geared towards quality improvement, product development and business re-engineering • Firm-supplier collaboration is the most adopted collaboration type • Lack of trust and insufficient knowledge about capability are the most influential barriers to innovation collaboration.
  12. 12. Next Steps • Pilot Innovation Action with Firms  Working with firms as an ‘innovation agent’ to help firms overcome capability and trust barriers  Action Research • Develop a process model for innovation collaboration across industry sectors
  13. 13. February 2018 (6 Months) Project Plan & Engagement End of 1st Phase (12 Months) Interviews, Analysis & Report August 2019 (18 Months) Collection & Completion of Survey End of 2nd Phase (24 Months) February 2020 Analysis & Report February 2021 (36 Months) Development of Practice Model Timeline

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