Meeting The Challenge Of Our Time In The 21st Century

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THE “BEST SOLUTION SET” IS THE FRAMEWORK OF DISASTER RESILIENCE. To anticipate and plan for the full spectrum of what can happen, and build capacity FOR preparedness, protection, early warning, emergency response, and recovery in every community. To inform, educate, train, and build equity in all sectors of the community. Powerpoint courtesy of Dr Walter Hays, Global Alliance for Disaster Reduction

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Meeting The Challenge Of Our Time In The 21st Century

  1. 1. MEETING THE CHALLENGE OFOUR TIME IN THE 21ST CENTURY
  2. 2. CREATING PARADIGM SHIFTS THAT WILL ACCELERATETHE TRANSITION FROM BEING DISASTER PRONE TO BEING DISASTER RESILIENT
  3. 3. THE CHALLENGE OF THE 21ST CENTURY • Protecting and preserving PEOPLE and COMMUNITIES from the potential disaster agents of natural hazards
  4. 4. A SNAPHOT OF OUR WORLD• 7 billion people, and growing while…• Living and competing in an interconnected global economy,• Producing $60 trillion of products each year, and• Facing complex disasters every year that can adversely impact a community’s 3 S’s, 5E’s, and 1H.
  5. 5. THE 3 S’s • SAFETY (from the potential disaster agents of recurring natural hazards) • SECURITY • SUSTAINABILITY
  6. 6. THE FIVE E’s • ECONOMY • ENERGY • ENVIRONMENT • ECOLOGY • EDUCATION
  7. 7. THE 1 H • HEALTH CARE
  8. 8. A DISASTER is ------ the set of failures that occur whenthree continuums: 1) people, 2)community (i.e., a set of habitats,livelihoods, and social constructs), and3) recurring events (e.g., floods,earthquakes, ...,) intersect at a point inspace and time, when and where thepeople and community are not ready.
  9. 9. THE THREE CONTINUUMS OF EVERY DISASTER• PEOPLE• COMMUNITY• RECURRING EVENTS (AKA the potential disaster agents of Natural Hazards, which are proof of a DYNAMIC EARTH)
  10. 10. FIVE INTER-CONNECTED WEAK-LINKS CAUSE DISASTERS• UN--PREPARED• UN—PROTECTED• UN---WARNED• UN--ABLE TO RESPOND• UN--RESILIENT
  11. 11. LIKELY CAUSES OF COMPLEX DISASTERS DURING THE 21ST CENTURY• Increasing morbidity, mortality, homelessness,and economic losses from recurring naturalhazards striking non-disaster-resilientcommunities• Threats related to global climate change• Environmental degradation and pollution of air,water, and soil• Endangerment and extinction of plant and animal life
  12. 12. LIKELY CAUSES OF COMPLEX DISASTERSDURING THE 21ST CENTURY• Poverty• Chronic hunger• Health care needs• Increasing risk of pandemic disease• Large-scale migration of people• Endangered plant and animal life• Conflict and terrorism
  13. 13. AN UNDESIRABLE LEGACY OF THE21ST CENTURYBefore we realize it, we couldshare in an unnecessary andirreversible reduction in thequality of life on Planet Earth ifwe fail to design and implementa global strategy for disasterresilience.
  14. 14. THE “BEST SOLUTION SET” IS THEFRAMEWORK OF DISASTER RESILIENCE• To anticipate and plan for the full spectrum of what can happen, and build capacity FOR preparedness, protection, early warning, emergency response, and recovery in every community.• To inform, educate, train, and build equity in all sectors of the community,
  15. 15. WHEN YOU KNOW WHAT TO DOAND HOW TO DO IT, --- JUST DO IT!• Communities working strategicallycan implement a realistic set ofscientific, technical, and politicalsolutions to reach the elusive goal ofdisaster resilience --- withinEXISTING administrative, legal, andeconomic constraints, --- NOW.
  16. 16. THE ART AND SCIENCE OF CREATINGA PARADIGM SHIFT FOR COMMUNITY DISASTER RESILIENCE ENCOMPASSES STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS  INTEGRATION OF SCIENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY PREPAREDNESS, PROTECTION, EARLY WARNING, EM. RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY
  17. 17. FIVE PILLARS OF DISASTER RESILIENCE ARE INTERCONNECTEDPREPAREDNESS PROTECTION AND EARLY WARNING ALL ELEMENTS ARE INTERRELATED EMERGENCYRECOVERY RESPONSE
  18. 18. THE GLOBAL AGENDA: COMMUNITY THE GLOBAL AGENDA: COMMUNITY DISASTER RESILIENCE DISASTER RESILIENCE EXPERIENCES WITH PREPAREDNESS EXPERIENCES WITH PROTECTIONEXPAND PARTNERSHIPSEXPAND PARTNERSHIPS GLOBAL BOOKS OFFROM 1990 TO THEFROM 1990 TO THE KNOWLEDGEPRESENT (E.G., IDNDR,PRESENT (E.G., IDNDR,AND ISDR)AND ISDR) EXPERIENCES WITH EMERGENCY RESPONSE EXPERIENCES WITH RECOVERY
  19. 19. FACTORS THAT FACILITATE PARADIGM SHIFTS• PUBLIC AWARENESS OF EACH PROBLEM AND THE BENEFIT/COSTS OF ITS SOLUTION SET.• A COMMON AGENDA PROMOTED BY PARTNERSHIPS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD• INCENTIVES FOR POLITICAL LEADERS AND SCIENTISTS TO ADOPT AND IMPLEMENT PUBLIC POLICIES AND BEST PRACTICES FOR DISASTER RESILIENCE.
  20. 20. CHANGES BASED ON A LARGER SOCIAL CONSTRUCT OF THE ISSUESPOLICY CHANGE 1: FOCUS ON THENATURE AND APPROPRIATENESS OFACTIONS BY GLOBAL PARTNERS ANDTHE WAYS TO ENLIST SUPPORT ANDRESOURCES FOR THE FIVE PILLARS OFDISASTER RESILIENCE.
  21. 21. CHANGES BASED ON A LARGER SOCIAL CONSTRUCT OF THE ISSUES POLICY CHANGE 2: FOSTER CHANGE BY INTEGRATING POLICIES AND BEST PRACTICES FOR PREPAREDNESS, PROTECTION, EARLY WARNING, EMERGENCY RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY BASED ON EXISTING LEGAL MANDATES.
  22. 22. CHANGES BASED ON A LARGER SOCIAL CONSTRUCT OF THE ISSUESPOLICY CHANGE 3: CREATE, ADJUST,AND REALIGN PARTNERSHIPS UNTILYOU CAN SOLVE THE PROBLEMSFACED BY LOCAL COMMUN ITIES INEVERY REGION.
  23. 23. TOWARDS DISASTER RESILIENCE TOWARDS DISASTER RESILIENCE TURNING POINTS: Partnerships for Preparedness, Protection, Early TURNING POINTS: Partnerships for Preparedness, Protection, Early Warning Emergency Response, and Recovery Warning Emergency Response, and RecoveryTHE KNOWLEDGE BASE CAPACITY BUILDING CONTINUING EDUCATIONReal and Near- Real Time Seek out, Enlighten, and Enlighten Communities onMonitoring/Communication Enable “Partnerships” Their RisksVulnerability and Risk Build Strategic EquityCharacterization Transfer Ownership of the Through “MMA” Scenarios Knowledge BaseBest Practices for Mitigationand Adaptation Close Gaps in Knowledge Engage Partners in MMA and Implementation Learning ExperiencesSituation Data Bases Transfer Ownership of Multiply “Partnerships” byCause & Effect Relationships Emerging Technologies Regioal/global TwinningAnticipatory Actions for all Move Towards A Disaster Update Knowledge BasesEvents and Situations Intelligent Community After Each MMA ScenarioInterfaces with all Real- andNear Real-Time SourcesGateways to a DeeperUnderstanding
  24. 24. RISK ASSESSMENT ACCEPTABLE RISK •HAZARD MAPS •INVENTORY RISK •VULNERABILITY UNACCEPTABLE RISK •LOCATION DISASTER RESILIENCE DATA BASES YOUR AND INFORMATION COMMUNITY COMMUNITY GOALS BEST POLICIES ANDHAZARDS: PRACTICES FOR:GROUND SHAKINGGROUND FAILURE •PREPAREDNESS, EARLY.SURFACE FAULTINGTECTONIC DEFORMATION WARNING, PROTECTIONTSUNAMI RUN UP •EM. RESPONSEAFTERSHOCKS •RECOVERY

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