Perspective
• Perspective (from Latin perspicere, to see  through) in the graphic arts, such as  drawing, is an approximate representa...
• The two most characteristic features of  perspective are that objects are drawn:
• Smaller as their distance from the  observer increases
• Foreshortened: the size of an objects  dimensions along the line of sight are  relatively shorter than dimensions across...
• Early history• The earliest art paintings and drawings  typically sized objects and characters  hierarchically according...
• The most important figures are often  shown as the highest in a composition,  also from hieratic motives, leading to the...
• The only method to indicate the relative  position of elements in the composition  was by overlapping, of which much use...
• Systematic attempts to evolve a system of  perspective are usually considered to have  begun around the 5th century B.C....
• Using flat panels on a stage to give the  illusion of depth.• The  philosophersAnaxagoras and Democritus  worked out geo...
• Alcibiades had paintings in his house  designed based on skenographia, thus  this art was not confined merely to the  st...
• Euclids Opticsintroduced a mathematical  theory of perspective; however, there is  some debate over the extent to which ...
Perspective
Perspective
Perspective
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Perspective

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Perspective

  1. 1. Perspective
  2. 2. • Perspective (from Latin perspicere, to see through) in the graphic arts, such as drawing, is an approximate representation, on a flat surface (such as paper), of an image as it is seen by the eye.
  3. 3. • The two most characteristic features of perspective are that objects are drawn:
  4. 4. • Smaller as their distance from the observer increases
  5. 5. • Foreshortened: the size of an objects dimensions along the line of sight are relatively shorter than dimensions across the line of sight
  6. 6. • Early history• The earliest art paintings and drawings typically sized objects and characters hierarchically according to their spiritual or thematic importance, not their distance from the viewer, and did not use foreshortening.
  7. 7. • The most important figures are often shown as the highest in a composition, also from hieratic motives, leading to the "vertical perspective", common in the art of Ancient Egypt, where a group of "nearer" figures are shown below the larger figure or figures.
  8. 8. • The only method to indicate the relative position of elements in the composition was by overlapping, of which much use is made in works like the Parthenon Marbles.
  9. 9. • Systematic attempts to evolve a system of perspective are usually considered to have begun around the 5th century B.C. in the art of Ancient Greece, as part of a developing interest in illusionism allied to theatrical scenery and detailed withinAristotles Poetics as skenographia:
  10. 10. • Using flat panels on a stage to give the illusion of depth.• The philosophersAnaxagoras and Democritus worked out geometric theories of perspective for use with skenographia.
  11. 11. • Alcibiades had paintings in his house designed based on skenographia, thus this art was not confined merely to the stage.
  12. 12. • Euclids Opticsintroduced a mathematical theory of perspective; however, there is some debate over the extent to which Euclids perspective coincides with a modern mathematical definition of perspective.

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