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The connections between authenticity and native-speakerism: Students’ reactions to international English varieties

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The connections between authenticity and native-
speakerism: Students’ reactions to international
English varieties
CELC S...

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Overview
What I did
• Authenticity and Native-speakerism
Results
• Of the study
Implications
• Reactions to international ...

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No time for Definitions
• Please see Pinner, 2016; Lowe & Pinner, 2016
• We have all experienced Native-speakerism,
either...

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The connections between authenticity and native-speakerism: Students’ reactions to international English varieties

  1. 1. The connections between authenticity and native- speakerism: Students’ reactions to international English varieties CELC Symposium, Singapore 26th May 2016 11:40-12:10 Seminar Room 1 Richard Pinner
  2. 2. Overview What I did • Authenticity and Native-speakerism Results • Of the study Implications • Reactions to international speakers
  3. 3. No time for Definitions • Please see Pinner, 2016; Lowe & Pinner, 2016 • We have all experienced Native-speakerism, either as prejudice or privilege.
  4. 4. Lowe, R., & Pinner, R. (2016). Finding the Connections Between Native-speakerism and Authenticity. Applied Linguistics Review, 7(1), 27-52. doi: 10.1515/applirev-2016-0002
  5. 5. This Study
  6. 6. Frankenstein • Data comes from a classroom activity • Activity was not designed for research/data collection • Data comes from several collection points with different groups (teachers and students) in Japan
  7. 7. What did I do? • Taught Global English and World Englishes • Empower the students (and teachers) with ownership of the English Language • Stress the importance of celebrating the varieties of English
  8. 8. What did I do? • After learning about Global English watched videos of people from around the world speaking English • Participants rate the speakers in these videos out of 10 for ‘authenticity’ – Authenticity is purposefully left undefined • Participants write a comment to explain their choice
  9. 9. Name Nationality Average St. Dev. Ban Ki-moon Korean 4.40 3.00 14th Dalai Lama China (Tibet) 4.74 1.81 Edwin Thumboo Singaporean 5.54 2.83 Shinzo Abe Japanese 5.75 1.33 Dynamo British (Northern) 6.30 1.65 Naomi Watts British/Australian 7.88 2.45 Arnold Schwarzenegger Austrian 8.51 1.49 Barack Obama North American 8.65 2.83 Queen Elizabeth II British (RP) 9.07 1.48 N= 41
  10. 10. 0.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00 7.00 8.00 9.00 10.00 Korean Japanese China (Tibet) Singaporean British (Northern) British/Australian North American Austrian British (RP) Nationality
  11. 11. Overall average 4.40 (lowest) (4) “He’s Korean” [Chinese student] (8) “His English is formal and like native speakers!” (2) “He is not good at speaking English natively.” (4) “He speaks English fluently. But he doesn't make eye contact with people. Because his speech isn't persuasive.” (5) “I don't think he is poor at speaking English. However, he is a Korean.” (5) “The way he pronounced "L" and "R" / "B" and "V" seemed almost the same, so it sounded unnatural.”
  12. 12. Overall average 4.74 • (4) “ He makes eye contact with people and he try to convey his thought to people. But his way of talking is a fool.” • (5) “His English is easy for me.” • (10) “He is top of Japanese” • (4) “He made too many pauses between phrases, so it sounded quite awkward.”
  13. 13. Overall average 5.54 • (3) “Chinglish” [Chinese student] • (3) “He is a suspicious-looking person.” • (1) “I don't like him. I think he isn't a gentleman.” • (7) “I feel his English is not good. His English is similar to mine.”
  14. 14. Overall average 5.75 • (5) “I can understand his English fully. His English is easy to hear for Japanese, but I think it's not authentic.” • (3) “I think his English isn't the same as native English” • (8) “His English is similar to Native Speaker's, but different a bit.” • (9) “I can understand his speech easier than [Ban Ki Moon]”
  15. 15. Overall average 8.65 • (10) “I love Arnold Schwarzenegger and He is native English speaker.” • (9) “He is native and it is easy to hear.” • (10) “He is a native speaker.” • (9) “He is very nice guy” • (8) “The speed and rhythm of his English was closer to native speakers but I sometimes felt his "ur" sound and "or" sound unnatural.”
  16. 16. Overall average 9.07 (highest) • (8) “I want like Queen Elizabeth II. I want to go to England someday.” • (10) “Hers is royal. • (10) “Se [sic] is more 'authentic' because she must speak collect [sic] English.” • (10) “She is queen” • (10) “She is the queen” • (10) “She's a Queen” • (10) “Because It is official British movie” • (9) “Her native language is English, and her end of a word is not clear” • (5) “Because she spoke dispassionately, so I felt it is difficult to understand what she wanted to say.”
  17. 17. 6.20 9.00 E L2 E L1 AVERAGE EL1 OR EL2
  18. 18. Non-linuistic 62% Linguistic 38% Authenticity Judgement Non-linuistic Linguistic
  19. 19. TEACHER GROUPS
  20. 20. 9.3 9.7 6.4 6.0 7.0 5.2 6.6 7.1 7.2 6.6 5.6 3.5 British American Indian Singpore Korean Geordie Japanese English Teacher's Ratings 2015 Avg 2014 Avg
  21. 21. Self-discrimination Reves, T., & Medgyes, P. (1994). The non-native English speaking EFL/ESL teacher's self-image: An international survey. System, 22(3), 353- 367.
  22. 22. Conditioning through Market Forces Holliday, A. (2005). The struggle to teach English as an international language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  23. 23. Authenticity Pinner, R. S. (2014). The authenticity continuum: Towards a definition incorporating international voices. English Today, 30(4), 22-27. Pinner, R. S. (2016). Reconceptualising Authenticity for English as a Global Language. Bristol: Multilingual Matters.
  24. 24. Summary • You can download the slides and additional resources at www.uniliterate.com • Please email me! rpinner@sophia.ac.jp 5/29/2016 26
  25. 25. Thanks for your attention! 5/29/2016 27 Pinner, R. S. (2014). The authenticity continuum: Towards a definition incorporating international voices. English Today, 30(4), 22-27. Pinner, R. S. (2016). Reconceptualising Authenticity for English as a Global Language. Bristol: Multilingual Matters. Lowe, R., & Pinner, R. (2016). Finding the Connections Between Native-speakerism and Authenticity. Applied Linguistics Review, 7(1), 27-52. doi: 10.1515/applirev-2016-0002

Editor's Notes

  • Outline study ASAP no apologies just 3 mins of the context
  • I will assume people know what Native-speakerism is because we all will have experienced it, either as prejudice or privilege.
  • Be SURE to mention Teachers and STUDENTS in JAPAN
  • You have been forewarned. This is classroom practice first and the data is merely what I collected in class.
  • Tried to empower students, tried to stress the importance of the issue.
  • 8 speakers.
  • CV >= 1 indicates a relatively high variation
  • Overall, he didn’t do so badly compared to other Asians.
  • This despite world english
  • The two students in the class who had lived abroad for a longer period of time, attending schools overseas, both assigned The Queen a score of 10/10
  • Seems to be self-discrimination many students prefer to listen to native-speakers and they are conditioned to think that native speakers are better, they do not know that the native-speaker is a myth and they do not know about ELF…. They do not realize that most of the communication they do in English will be ELF.
  • ELT is not ELF, but prejudices from ELT industry will bleed into ELF (eg. Jenkins Lingua Franca core is of learners), ELF relies on interlocutors having achieved sufficient proficiency to communicate, presumably through learning and instruction. Therefore the way they learned English is part of their beliefs in ELF. Prejudices from learning will influence interactions in ELF.
  • Students were not told this in the study

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