2014/3/25
1
Does CLIL work for Japanese secondary school
students?: Potential for the ‘weak’ version of CLIL
CLIL in Japan...
2014/3/25
2
Result (1): CLIL lessons = high density Student’s comment
I learnt about the world situation that I
hadn’t kno...
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Does CLIL work for Japanese secondary school students?: Potential for the ‘weak’ version of CLIL by Makoto Ikeda

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Symposium Presentation slides from Professor Makoto Ikeda based on his article for the International CLIL Research Journal. http://www.icrj.eu/21/contents.html

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Does CLIL work for Japanese secondary school students?: Potential for the ‘weak’ version of CLIL by Makoto Ikeda

  1. 1. 2014/3/25 1 Does CLIL work for Japanese secondary school students?: Potential for the ‘weak’ version of CLIL CLIL in Japan: Beyond the European context 26 March 2014, Sophia University Makoto Ikeda (makoto-i@sophia.ac.jp) Two types of CLIL Bentley (2009) Dale and Tanner (2012) Total immersion Partial immersion Subject courses Language classes based on thematic units Language classes with greater use of content Strong/hard CLIL Content-oriented Weak/soft CLIL Language-oriented Ball (2009) Partial immersion Subject-led (modular) Language-led Subject lessons taught by CLIL subject teachers Language lessons taught by CLIL language teachers Working definition ‘Weak/soft’ CLIL is a type of content and language integrated instruction taught by trained CLIL language teachers to help learners develop their target language competency as a primary aim and their subject/theme/topic knowledge as a secondary aim. Research context School: Wako Kokusai High School in Saitama Participants: 80 students (16-17 years old; 62 female and 18 male students; B1 on CEFR) Teachers: Two experienced CLIL language teachers (Japanese) and ALTs (native speakers) Content: Global issues (e.g. war and peace) Period: 35 weeks from April 2012 to March 2013 (62.5 hours for two groups and 72.5 hours for the other two.) Research questions (1) Do the students perceive any CLIL features which are distinct from normal English lessons? (2) Does their language proficiency develop as a result of CLIL lessons? Instruments (1) Course evaluation questionnaire 10 multiple-choice and 1 open-ended questions (2) Essay writing tests (pre-test and post-test) Criterion Online Writing Evaluation Service
  2. 2. 2014/3/25 2 Result (1): CLIL lessons = high density Student’s comment I learnt about the world situation that I hadn’t known at all [Content/Culture]. I enjoyed the lessons particularly because I thought about the topics deeply using my head [Cognition], discussed with my friends [Communication/Culture] and gave presentations in groups [Communication/Culture]. Result (2) = Some developemt in writing More words, more vocaburary types but more errors Category Scale Test Mean SD t-value Holisticscore Criterionscore Pre-test Post-test 2.03 2.72 0.73 0.77 -8.10** Fluency Numberof words Pre-test Post-test 153.67 196.38 53.24 63.99 -6.47** Accuracy Numberof errors Pre-test Post-test 15.03 19.61 8.30 10.04 -3.55** Numberof errors persentence Pre-test Post-test 1.07 1.29 0.43 0.54 -2.98** Complexity Numberof wordtypes Pre-test Post-test 83.38 97.33 21.09 24.86 -4.86** Percentage of Base list1words Pre-test Post-test 83.92 80.88 5.14 5.33 3.76** Percentage of Base list2words Pre-test Post-test 4.78 5.16 2.48 2.48 -1.07 Percentage of Base list3words Pre-test Post-test 3.00 3.39 1.79 1.37 -1.75 Percentage of otherwords Pre-test Post-test 8.30 10.58 4.12 4.75 -3.40* Findings (1) The students noticed there were distinct CLIL characteristics in the course that were different from other English lessons. (2) The learners’ overall written English proficiency developed, particularly in terms of fluency and complexity. NB These language learning gains cannot be totally attributable to the CLIL lessons, as the participants also learnt English outside the CLIL classroom. Conclusions  A ‘weak’ form of CLIL does work for Japanese secondary school students.  The ‘soft’ version of CLIL should be recognised as an adapted, contextualised breed while, at the same time, its authentic, universal model (i.e. ‘hard’ CLIL) is pursued as the norm.  Effective CLIL lessons can be conducted by teachers who are adequately and amply trained in CLIL theories and skills.

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