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E design storytelling_ux stories

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E design storytelling_ux stories

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E design storytelling_ux stories

  1. 1. STORYTELLING A BRANDING TOOL C O M M U N I C A T I O N Narration is as much a  part of human nature as breath and the  circulation of blood. —A.S.Byatt (writer) ”
  2. 2. The good story STORY AND BRANDING (B) 3 The good story moves us, makes us think and feel.  We can recognize our fears, our hopes and dreams. C O M M U N I C A T I O N
  3. 3. Storytelling: The Basics S T O R Y T E L L I N G
  4. 4. The four elements of  storytelling Let’s start out by looking at what we need to make good story.  In Storytelling Klaus Fog (et al) identifies four core elements: When we are dealing with storytelling, we need to identify the different aspects of our story. What is the message,  how to communicate it (media  and medium code), what do we want to achieve and by what channels (technology).  In short:  How are we staging the story? You can define these as follows (next slides) … C O M M U N I C A T I O N S T O R Y T E L L I N G
  5. 5. Message Conflict Characters Plot The moral of the story. The focused theme. The cause,the challanges. How to solve it.  Who is who (roles)? How do we percieve of a  person first time (exposition)? Values? Goals?  How to stage the plot‐key events? Substance Drive and  mechanisms C O M M U N I C A T I O N The four elements of  storytelling “(Maybe I’m not) that far away from civilisation,  perhaps … If I can manage it over that hill … But?!” “But, yes! I can see lights in the distance … the  lights from a small village! I might not freeze to  death after all …” Franquin: IDÉES NOIRES S T O R Y T E L L I N G
  6. 6. Part of: the substance. The message, or the core‐message,  is the single message you aim to communicate. There may be nuances in the different levels of  conflicts, plot structure and character traits, but  along the way (or in the end) there must be a  core‐message. Message C O M M U N I C A T I O N E X T E R M I N A T E ! S T O R Y T E L L I N G
  7. 7. Conflict C O M M U N I C A T I O N Part of: the drive and the  mechanisms of the story. The conflict must be important enough to  make people engaged.  And it must be possible to solve.  The story can refer to a typical consumer’s conflict (how often have you not tried to …  etc.) Or the conflict can be a part of the theme when referring to how you solved a  company crisis (internal communication). S T O R Y T E L L I N G
  8. 8. 2 Characters C O M M U N I C A T I O N Part of: the drive and the mechanisms of the story. There are character driven stories, plot  driven stories or a mix of both. Character driven stories focuses on the  characters and, secondary, on the story’s plot. It may be a very typical plot in which the character is the driving force. The plot can also be the driving force,  perhaps even to the extent where the  characters are victims of the plot and are not able to avoid the events. S T O R Y T E L L I N G
  9. 9. The Fairy‐tale Model C O M M U N I C A T I O N S T O R Y T E L L I N G
  10. 10. An example (NASA) C O M M U N I C A T I O N S T O R Y T E L L I N G
  11. 11. Another example: Apple S T O R Y T E L L I N G
  12. 12. Plot (The Story Model) Hero/company‐employees and leaders Goal/ winning/passion Adversary/lack of confidence/bad times/competitors Support/courage to break down barriers/an opportunity/innovation Beneficiary/ the customers and the brand Benefactor /company‐brand (often also a hero) C O M M U N I C A T I O N POINT OF NO RETURN S T O R Y T E L L I N G
  13. 13. The Company’s Core Story S T O R Y T E L L I N G
  14. 14. The Core Story C O M M U N I C A T I O N S T O R Y T E L L I N G
  15. 15. 3 The Core Story C O M M U N I C A T I O N S T O R Y T E L L I N G
  16. 16. The Core Story and Digital  Storytelling Sharing the stories in social media C O M M U N I C A T I O N Digital storytelling is the interactive dialogue, that enables the core story to be developed and shared. Digital storytelling can be developed through dialogue in  Internal digital media such as intranet, closed projectforums and  relatively closed linkedin groups External and relatively open social networks like Facebook,  websites with interactive gameplay etc. S T O R Y T E L L I N G
  17. 17. The Core Story and Digital  Storytelling UX* stories *User Experience C O M M U N I C A T I O N Prescriptive structures (linear stories) are recognizable user experience story structures, that allows you to fill in the blanks. This first example is the Behaviour‐Driven Development structure: Title (sets the theme)    Given (context)    And (some more context) When (event)   Then (outcome)    And (another outcome) Example (inspired by Quesenbery & Brooks, 2010): (Title:) smartphone application saves lives. (given:) We are many who usually tell ourselves, that we ought to learn first aid techniques if someone someday might need critical help. (when:) This  was exactly what flashed through Peter’s head, when he suddenly became the witness of a  traffic accident. The driver had hit the tree, and when Peter arrived at the car, the man inside the  car was unconscious. (Then/outcome:) Then Peter remembered, that he recently downloaded the First Aid App. He quickly opened the app, tapped for instructions, and by the aid of visual and  aiditive instructions he managed to make the person safe and call for help.  (And/another outcome:) Had it been more serious, Peter would have needed better skills. So now he has  joined a first aid course. But without this app, he says, he would have panicked. Quesenbery & Brooks (2010): Storytelling for User Experience. Rosenfeld S T O R Y T E L L I N G
  18. 18. The Core Story and Digital  Storytelling UX Stories C O M M U N I C A T I O N Prescriptive structures (linear stories) are recognizable user experience story structures, that allows you to fill in the blanks. This second example is the Me‐Them‐Me structure*: Example (inspired by Quesenbery & Brooks, 2010): (Me:) I love  going to fitness workout in teams, but sometimes the training is cancelled due to  illness or the lack of a substitute instructor. (Them:) The fitness company really need a service  system, that could provide the clients with messages about cancelled training, news and other good and practical stuff. (me:) I told them about company X and their great interactive system  combined with an app soultion, and now I always get their messages before going to the training. *It’s a bit similar to the Now‐Then‐Now structure, only told in a more personal way. Quesenbery & Brooks (2010): Storytelling for User Experience. Rosenfeld S T O R Y T E L L I N G
  19. 19. The Core Story and Digital  Storytelling UX Stories C O M M U N I C A T I O N Prescriptive structures (linear stories) are recognizable user experience story structures, that allows you to fill in the blanks. This third example is the Hero’s journey methapor: Quesenbery & Brooks (2010): Storytelling for User Experience. Rosenfeld Everyday World The Call to  adventure The return to this world The threshold Between worlds World of the Quest Initiation  and trials Achieving the goal Quick assignment (Two‐by‐two:)  Tell each other about a movie you’ve seen that follows this structure. For example Lord of the Rings (Frodo’s journey)? S T O R Y T E L L I N G
  20. 20. The Core Story and Digital  Storytelling UX Stories C O M M U N I C A T I O N Some good advice when working with digital storytelling (Qesenbery & Brooks, 2010): Listening and talking • If you don’t know your audience well, try listening to them. • Let them tell stories. Analyze these stories. Then respond (talk). • In talking to your audience, use the right voice and language. • Prescriptive structures can be implemented, but be open for critics.  and alternative structures made in response to your story. Context • Make room for imagination (don’t be too detailed in your stories). • Use representative characters and situations (context and persona). • Keep the story short and on track (plot). Quesenbery & Brooks (2010): Storytelling for User Experience. Rosenfeld S T O R Y T E L L I N G
  21. 21. Literature Quesenbery & Brooks (2010):  Storytelling for User Experience.  Rosenfeld Fog, Klaus (2004, 2009): Storytelling. Branding in practice. Samfundslitteratur / Sigma  /  Springer Verlag. C O M M U N I C A T I O N S T O R Y T E L L I N G

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