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Need a Short-term, Day or Part-time Office? 
Receive 10% off only with this promo code “ENET111014”. 
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FEATURED ARTICLES 
Find Almost Anybody’s Email Address With #LinkedIn by Irina Shamavea ……………….6 
The Five Websites All...
4
5
6 
Many of you have read through the post Find (Almost) Anybody’s Email Address by Rob Ousbey and use his technique. Rob h...
7 
Step 3. On the Contacts Settings Page on LinkedIn select the “Outlook contacts import” op- tion to import the saved fil...
8 
Further Applications of the “Hack” 
Here is a variation of quickly solving another sourcing task, using the import func...
9 
The Five Websites All Tech Recruiters 
Need to Know About 
By Gild 
| Recruiting & Sourcing | 
Hunting for developers t...
10 
Why recruiters should pay attention to this website: 
Sitepoint allows anyone in web development to write for the webs...
11 
If you’re going to succeed as a tech recruiter, you need to know where tech talent is par- ticipating. It doesn’t matt...
12 
A while ago I wrote what proved to be a popular blog about how to resign with grace. 
But what about the manager who g...
13 
and the impulse. Play to the commercial imperative. 
Don’t be petty. “Well, you can stop using the company car park fr...
14 
You may think an organization with dangerous working conditions, mind-blowing stress, and thankless assignments would ...
15 
otherwise begin to feel stuck. The next item is related: 
2. Be a résumé builder. Ironically, the best employers are o...
16 
vate organization. Because of the nature of the work and the requirement for top-secret se- curity clearances, clandes...
17 
Originally published two years ago, the meat of this post remains newsworthy. All of the fal- deral surrounding employ...
18 
Employment Branding for Passive Candidates 
By John Sumser, HR Examiner.com 
 You can’t recruit and hire passive cand...
19 
Employment Branding for Passive Candidates 
By John Sumser, HR Examiner.com 
1. Communicating the company’s reputation...
20 
Effective Recruiting Step 1: 
Meeting with the hiring manager 
By Marilyn Manzi, SF Workplace Examiner 
The first meet...
21 
Effective Recruiting Step 2: 
Creating a sourcing matrix 
By Marilyn Manzi, SF Workplace Examiner 
The role of a Talen...
22 
Effective Recruiting Step 3: 
Creating an email template 
By Marilyn Manzi, SF Workplace Examiner 
Software Engineers,...
23 
Effective Recruiting Step 4: 
Phone Screen 
By Marilyn Manzi, SF Workplace Examiner 
The hook email, caught the attent...
24 
Effective Recruiting Step 4: 
Phone Screen 
By Marilyn Manzi, SF Workplace Examiner 
Set aside a window of time each d...
25 
How HubSpot’s First VP of Engineering Made Their First 40 Technical Hires 
By Entelo.com 
The following is an exclusiv...
26 
How HubSpot’s First VP of Engineering Made Their First 40 Technical Hires 
By Entelo.com 
Where did you find most of t...
27 
How HubSpot’s First VP of Engineering Made Their First 40 Technical Hires 
By Entelo.com 
With that said, when compani...
28 
How HubSpot’s First VP of Engineering Made Their First 40 Technical Hires 
By Entelo.com 
I look at GitHub, Apache, Mo...
29 
How HubSpot’s First VP of Engineering Made Their First 40 Technical Hires 
By Entelo.com 
With product candidates, it’...
30 
How HubSpot’s First VP of Engineering Made Their First 40 Technical Hires 
By Entelo.com 
Let’s say you could go back ...
31 
The CEO of an emerging growth company called me a while ago, a bit shocked after hav- ing seen the employment contract...
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fit all. Before you embark on drafting employment agreements for your international opera- tions, think through the st...
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jurisdiction recognize the principle of choice of applicable law, this is usually overridden by considerations of publ...
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9. You don’t issue your contract on time. Often, some delay is not a big deal, but there are jurisdictions (most often...
35 
Are you finding yourself in an MBA recruitment comfort zone? 
Skilled MBA candidates can be found at every graduate bu...
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LaBine & Associates 
Specialize in IT and Sales 
San Mateo, CA 
Laura LaBine is a Recruiting Specialist based in the S...
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GDI Infotech 
IT Consulting and Staffing 
Ann Arbor, MI 
GDI Infotech offers IT Solutions for Information Management a...
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Hatstand Ltd. 
Financial IT Consultancy 
New York, NY 
Hatstand is a global IT consultancy that works within investmen...
39 
Kismet Staffing 
Recruiting for Technology Companies 
Portland, OR 
Recruiting for technology companies nationwide. Ex...
40 
Michael Page 
Nick Powell, Executive Director 
Contingent and Retained Recruitment 
San Francisco, Bay Area, CA 
Micha...
41 
Talent Avenue 
Creative Talent Staffing 
San Francisco, Bay Area, CA 
This isn’t some stuffy, corporate recruiting fir...
42 
GreeneSearch, Inc. 
Specialize in Engineering and 
Product Manager Roles 
San Mateo, CA 
Founded in 2004, we provide t...
43 
Randstad USA 
Joseph Sciscione, Technical Recruiter 
Greater New York City Area, NJ 
For more than 25 years, Randstad ...
44 
Goldstrike! 
Ken Reed, Founder 
San Francisco Bay Area, CA 
Ken Reed founded Goldstrike in 2013, after building two pr...
45 
Southeast TAX Connection 
Placing Corporate Tax Professionals 
Greater Atlanta Area, GA 
Southeast TAX Connection is a...
46 
DEVON Wright 
Direct Hire and Temporary Staffing 
New York, NY 
DAVON Wright is a full-service, nationwide staffing ag...
47 
Allah Smith 
Recruiter 
Houston, TX 
Brenda Rose 
Executive Recruiter 
Danville, CA 
Carlton Eaton 
VP 
Marietta, GA 
...
48 
Alex Knox 
Sr. Technical Recruiter 
Calabasas- ere, CA 
Andrea Carden 
Sr. Recruiter 
Huntsville, AL 
Elizabeth Nelson...
49 
Elaina Frizzell 
Co-Founder/President & Recruiter 
Oak Ridge, TN 
Eric Hoagberg 
Managing Partner 
Raleigh, NC 
Fred T...
50 
Dominika Skladowska 
Recruiter 
BIOT, Outside U.S. 
Donna Rutledge 
Sr. Technical Talent Partner 
San Mateo, CA 
Dorot...
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014
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Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014

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Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting guidebook showcases the latest tools and technical recruiters servicing the high tech sectors. Whether you are looking to hire a search firm or acquire the right sourcing tools for your recruiting project, you'll find them here! Articles included in this edition:
P.6 Find Almost Anybody's Email Address With Linkedin
P.9 The Five Websites All Tech Recruiters Need to Know About
P.12 Somebody resigned. Don't be a fool. Stay cool.
P.14 How The CIA Keeps Employees Happy
P.17 Employment Branding for Passive Candidates
P.20 Effective Recruiting Steps 1 to 4
P.25 How Hubspot's First VP of Engineering Hired Their First 40 Technical Hires
P.31 Top 10 Pitfalls in Managing in Employment Contracts as You Go Global
P.35 Broaden Your MBA Talent Search

Published in: Recruiting & HR
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Who's Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook Winter 2014

  1. 1. 2 Need a Short-term, Day or Part-time Office? Receive 10% off only with this promo code “ENET111014”. [Must provide this promo code to receive discount or click here to receive more information.] Short-term or day office needs A part-time office For start-ups and home workers Provide full-time office space for a project team, or overflow space for as long, or as short as you need. From $60 per day.* Don’t need an office all the time? Access a private office in any of our 2,000 worldwide locations 5 days every month. From $99 per month.* Use one of our locations with phone answer- ing, mail handling and access to meeting rooms. From $49 per month.* (* Pricing is subject to change. Please contact General Manager for details.) 2,000 locations | 750 cities | 100 countries Contact Regus General Manager Mardin Amiri at 408-573-5985 or email your inquires to mardin.amiri@regus.com
  2. 2. 3 FEATURED ARTICLES Find Almost Anybody’s Email Address With #LinkedIn by Irina Shamavea ……………….6 The Five Websites All Tech Recruiters Need to Know About by Gild………………………..9 Somebody resigned. Don’t be a fool. Stay cool by Greg Savage…………………….…..12 How The CIA Keeps Employees Happy by J.C. Carleson…………………………………...14 Employment Branding for Passive Candi- dates by John Sumser………………………...17 Effective Recruiting by Marilyn Manzi Step 1: Meeting with the hiring manager...20 Step 2: Creating a sourcing matrix ……......21 Step 3: Creating an email template ….......22 Step 4: Phone Screen ……………………......23 How HubSpot’s First VP of Engineering Hired Their First 40 Technical Hires by Entelo……..25 Top 10 Pitfalls in Managing in Employment Contracts as You Go Global by Ute Krudewagen……………………………………31 Broaden Your MBA Talent Search………….35 FEATURED RECRUITERS LaBine & Associates…………………………….36 GDI Infotech……………………………………..37 Hatstand Ltd……..….…………………………..38 Kismet Staffing…….…………………………….39 Michael Page US.....………………………...….40 Talent Avenue……………...……………………41 GreeneSearch……………..…………………....42 Randstad US...……...……………………………43 Goldstrike!.......…………………………………...44 Southeast TAX Connection…………………...45 Devon Wright……………………………………46 Recruiter Listings by Industry………..……...…47 WIN THIS BOOK! We are giving away Work Like A Spy (Business Tips from a Former CIA Officer) to one lucky reader. This is a book every manager should read. To enter the drawing send us an email with your name, title and company name to worklikeaspy@enetrecruiter.com. TABLE OF CONTENTS IMPORTANT NOTE: The Who’s Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook is produced by enetRecruiter, LLC. enetRecruiter is a service plat- form built to better connect hiring companies to essential HR & Recruiting tools and resources. All the resources and individuals featured in the guidebook are for general reference. enetRecruiter does not guaranty or warrant the accuracy, completeness of the information contained in this guidebook, or the qualifications, competence of the individuals and companies featured. Certain information con- tained in this guidebook is subject to change. Be sure to confirm with featured companies regarding their service offerings and pricing. Additionally, the authors of featured articles may have paid a fee to be included in this guidebook and featured recruiters includes both members as well as non-members on enetRecruiter.com. Copyright © 2014 enetRecruiter, LLC. All rights reserved. No portion of this guidebook may be reproduced without written permission from enetRecruiter, LLC. Contact us at info@enetrecruiter.com or visit our site at www.enetrecruiter.com.
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  5. 5. 6 Many of you have read through the post Find (Almost) Anybody’s Email Address by Rob Ousbey and use his technique. Rob has developed a Google Doc email permutator bit.ly/ name2email to create a list of potential correct email addresses of a person. Rob suggests that after populating the list with the possible email addresses we use http:// rapportive.com to verify which one is correct. For those who may need more than an occasional email guesswork: Here is how to do the same verification faster and, in some cases, more reliably, using #LinkedIn. The technique below is a variation of my 2010 post, that worked beautifully for almost four years, but is no longer working for those of us who got the new LinkedIn Contacts. The technique below is good for some other sourcing hacks besides the address guessing. Have a name and a company name? Step 1. Use the famous bit.ly/name2email tool to generate a list of possible email address- es. Step 2. Use this file: Outlook-Export-Format (download the csv file). Paste the list of emails from the Step 1 into the “email” column. Example. Suppose we want to find the correct address for Siobhan Neilland who works at Amazon. The Outlook-formatted file, which is the result of the steps 1 and 2, will look like this: Find Almost Anybody’s Email Address with #LinkedIn By Irina Shamaeva, Partner and Chief Sourcer at Brain Gain Recruiting | Recruiting & Sourcing |
  6. 6. 7 Step 3. On the Contacts Settings Page on LinkedIn select the “Outlook contacts import” op- tion to import the saved file. This is it! Here is what you will see in this particular example in the Contacts’ MS Outlook-imported section, found among the “Sources”. The person number two on the list is the one. So here is the result: we have identified the email of the person in question. If you look at her profile, you will see this email listed now “for us personally” in the “Contact Info” section of the profile. (Finding her correct email wasn’t such a hard task in this specific case, since she also lists the email address publicly on the profile.) As a “side effect” in this case we have found one more real person who is using another one of the generated email address- es. Apparently, the rest of the email addresses do not point to any LinkedIn members. Now… if you are looking to verify the correct email addresses of several people, you can do this in only one “step 2/step 3″ action for all of them, just by pasting the emails in ques- tion to the end of the outlook export file’s “email” column. The file will get extra rows but will continue working just fine. You can accomplish all of the guesswork about many people in one shot. Find Almost Anybody’s Email Address with #LinkedIn By Irina Shamaeva, Partner and Chief Sourcer at Brain Gain Recruiting | Recruiting & Sourcing |
  7. 7. 8 Further Applications of the “Hack” Here is a variation of quickly solving another sourcing task, using the import function as de- scribed above. You could use the technique in the steps 2-3 for a different sourcing task: verifying that for a given list of employees at a specific company everyone has email addresses following a specific pattern. In this scenario you may start with auto-creating a list of Emails instead of the email permutator. There’s another thing or two that can be done with this… later. If the target professional population you are working with is typically registered on LinkedIn, then this method of locating their correct email address may find more up-to-date results than Rapportive. This is because Rapportive crawls social profiles and is “behind” compared with straight checking with LinkedIn, as I have explained in this post. In any event it’s quick and is worth trying. For those people who are not on LinkedIn but are on another network such as Google+, Rapportive may work better; the two approaches can be combined, of course. Please keep an eye on this blog for other methods to be described, soon. ■ Irina Shamaeva is a recognized leader in Sourcing, Social Recruiting, and Internet Research. She is Partner and Chief Sourcer at Brain Gain Recruiting, an executive search firm with the focus on placing software development and management consulting can- didates nationwide. In addition to sourcing for her agency, Irina takes on Sourcing / Name Generation/Internet Research projects across numerous industries and geogra- phies – which she loves doing! Find Almost Anybody’s Email Address with #LinkedIn By Irina Shamaeva, Partner and Chief Sourcer at Brain Gain Recruiting | Recruiting & Sourcing | Learn to Source Like a Pro Sign Up for the People Sourcing Certification Program Designed and regularly updated by industry leader Irina Shamaeva, taught by a team of Master Sourcers, the Program stands out in the content quality and the practical value it provides. Teams from many large corporations have raised their productivity by attending the sourcing classes we provide. Visit us at http://sourcingcertification.com
  8. 8. 9 The Five Websites All Tech Recruiters Need to Know About By Gild | Recruiting & Sourcing | Hunting for developers to hire is time consuming and rather difficult, if you don’t know where to look. Normally, when recruiting, you might start your search on LinkedIn. But the problem is devel- opers don’t use it regularly. With tight hiring deadlines and low developer activity on a go-to professional network, one question comes to mind: where are the developers? In this article, we’ll cover five websites that developers are actively participating on, but you may not know exist. FIVE WEBSITES TECH RECRUITERS NEED TO KNOW Data Science Central Data Science Central is a community website that was built for - you guessed it - data sci- entists. This is a rich resource that covers every spectrum of data science - from analytics to visualization. Why recruiters should pay attention to this website: As the amount of data created on the web increases, it’s important to have people that can examine this data and turn it into useful information. By keeping tabs on Data Science Central, not only will you have a better understanding of data science topics, you’ll improve the way you communicate with this profession. TopCoder TopCoder, owned by Appirio, is a website where professional designers, developers, and data scientists work on problems for fun and rewards. Why recruiters should pay attention to this website: TopCoder differentiates itself from other websites for tech talent by weaving in gamification. With the ability to solve real problems, tech talent can showcase their abilities. And as a re- cruiter, this is exactly what you want to see. SitePoint Sitepoint is a content platform where professionals in all areas of web development write helpful articles.
  9. 9. 10 Why recruiters should pay attention to this website: Sitepoint allows anyone in web development to write for the website. This serves as a great platform for developers to share their expertise and help others succeed. You can use Sitepoint the same way you would use a site like Stack Overflow. If you’re look- ing for a developer that specializes in Ruby, you can view the Ruby topic on Sitepoint and get an idea of who’s knowledgeable. XDA-Developers Searching for developer talent that specializes in mobile technology? With over 5 million registered users, XDA-Developers is a community and resource dedicated to mobile tech. Why recruiters should pay attention to this website: The mobile revolution is here and because of it developers that specialize in mobile tech- nology are in high demand. With a large user base, XDA-Developers is a great website you can use to start your search and keep your finger on the pulse of the mobile world. Geeklist Geeklist is a social network built for developers and anyone interested in technology. Why recruiters should pay attention to this website: For tech talent, Geeklist can potentially be a better place to spend your time than LinkedIn. With the ability to share links, communicate with users who share similar interests, and follow specific technical topics, Geeklist is a network developers want to be part of. As a tech recruiter, you need to go where your target candidates hangout. This social net- work is one to keep on your radar. THIS IS THE TIP OF THE ICEBERG We covered five websites in this article, but the reality is new niche websites are popping up every day. | Recruiting & Sourcing | The Five Websites All Tech Recruiters Need to Know About By Gild
  10. 10. 11 If you’re going to succeed as a tech recruiter, you need to know where tech talent is par- ticipating. It doesn’t matter if a social network has millions of users or hundreds. If your target candidates aren’t active there, you’re wasting your time. Find out where your target candi- dates hang out and go there. Your next developer hire may be out there just waiting to be discovered. ■ Gild is changing the way everyone — from startups to Fortune 1000 organizations — finds and evaluates technical talent. Gild scours the web for developers, using predictive tech- nology to automatically evaluate their abilities. That means you not only find candidates — you know who can get the job done. Backed by proprietary data analysis that examines developers’ actual work, Gild’s tech hiring software is used by growing companies to find the developers they need to innovate. Founded in 2011, Gild is headquartered in San Fran- cisco and has offices in Salt Lake City and Milan. | Recruiting & Sourcing | The Five Websites All Tech Recruiters Need to Know About By Gild
  11. 11. 12 A while ago I wrote what proved to be a popular blog about how to resign with grace. But what about the manager who gets a resignation? How should they behave? Sad to say, the commercial world is rife with mind-blowing tales of how badly bosses react when an employee resigns. In the recruitment industry we all know of cases of petty, vindictive and childish behaviour when an employee resigns, especially to go to a competitor. I wrote before that the way you exit a company defines you in some way, and can hurt or help you in the future. The same goes for the receiver of the resignation. I appreciate better than most that the emotions that flood you when an employee resigns unexpectedly can cloud your judgment. You are angry, feel betrayed, scared of the reper- cussions perhaps. But retaining your dignity and acting with grace is the best way. Keep calm. This is hardest thing to do sometimes, I know. Retain your cool. Avoid saying threatening things. “I will get you for this”. Avoid saying emotive things. “After all I have done for you, you repay me with this?” You look foolish at best, and you inevitably inflame the situation. Mostly, if you behave like this it gives the departing employee all the ammuni- tion they need to neglect their remaining obligations to you and the company. So, you lose. Understand the reasons. This is hard. The employee has prepared their ‘spiel’. They have fi- nessed how they portray the reasons. Often it’s designed to diffuse the situation, and is not the real reason at all. Sometimes it’s an outright lie. You need to dig and explore, calmly and rationally, why this person wants to leave. Maybe the situation can be saved, if that is what you want. Maybe you can learn something about your own business that could save future resignations. Don’t make an impulsive counter-offer. You face losing a key person. You throw more mon- ey at them. There and then. Never a good look. Often regretted. First explore the reasons. Dig and discuss. A restructured package or evolved role may be an answer. But that comes later, in another discussion, if at all. Don’t boot them out the door. This happens all the time. It makes no sense. If the person is going to take data or secure relationships for their future job, trust me, they have done that already! The damage is already done. So now you need to act in your best interests. And your best interest may be to keep them right where they are while you put a few things in place to mitigate the damage. It might be just for a week, or a few days. But don’t kick them out the door in a knee-jerk display of pique. Be cool. Be smart. Suppress the emotion Somebody resigned. Don’t be a fool. Stay Cool. By Greg Savage | Employment |
  12. 12. 13 and the impulse. Play to the commercial imperative. Don’t be petty. “Well, you can stop using the company car park from today then!” You look like a jerk. Be bigger than that. Thank them. Yes, I know you are hugely pissed off. But this person worked for you. And if they are still there, we presume you valued their input. Thank them. It can do no harm, and usually helps a lot. Pay them what they are owed. Your choice, but shortchanging someone at this point inevi- tably leads to bitterness and often costly repercussions. And your remaining staff will hear of it and your reputation will be damaged. One door closes, another opens. If I only had a dollar for the times I have felt, and others have told me “We were devastated when she resigned, but in fact it’s been for the best. We never realized how destructive she was in the team, and things are much better now and other people have stepped up…” A resignation may be a negative, but it’s also an op- portunity. Look for that opportunity. Who can you promote? What team structure can you now change for the better? Keep the door open. My attitude to this is simple. If the person leaves on a sour note. Lies, is destructive, does not stick to their notice obligations, or coasts through that period, they are history to me as far as future employment goes. If, on the other hand they resign for sound reasons of their own, give appropriate notice, help with handover, maintain the right atti- tude, the last thing I say to them is this. “I wish you well, and if the circumstances are right for both of us, the door may well be open here in the future”. I probably re-hired 25 people over the years. And they just about all worked out, because now they know the grass is not greener on the other side. The way you handle stressful and challenging situations defines you as a leader. It adds to, or detracts from, your internal credibility too. I know it’s easy for me to give this advice, and in truth there are many times I have not be- haved like this myself. But I learned. I got better. I handled things differently over time. And I was much happier, and more effective as a leader, for it. ■ Greg was the founder of leading recruitment companies Firebrand Talent Search, People2People and Recruitment Solutions. He is an established global leader of the recruitment industry and a regular keynote speaker worldwide. Greg provides specialized advice for Recruitment, Professional Services & Social Media companies. Check out Greg’s blog here http://gregsavage.com.au/. Somebody resigned. Don’t be a fool. Stay Cool. By Greg Savage | Employment |
  13. 13. 14 You may think an organization with dangerous working conditions, mind-blowing stress, and thankless assignments would have trouble with retention. You would be wrong. Here's why top secret agents stick around. Obviously, the CIA is not a perfect place, and the job isn’t for every- one. As with any job, there are pros and cons to the undercover profession. The bureaucracy can be maddening, advancement can be slow, and there are plenty of incompetent jerks, just like in any large organization. Yet the clandestine service manages to retain many officers whose skills, education, and experiences would allow them to pursue their choice of opportunities in the outside world. In fact, the retention rate in the clandestine service compares very favorably to the pri- vate sector. So why do the employees stay? A big part of the reason for the impressive retention is because of the CIA’s mission. Case officers believe in what they do, and they like making a difference in the world. The travel opportunities, the glamour of the job, and the excitement also keep people around. But while these factors are not fully replicable in the corporate world, the CIA also utilizes a number of organizational strategies that can cer- tainly be duplicated by private employers to keep talented and in-demand employees happy and productive. The following organizational structures and strategies used by the CIA are listed not only be- cause they appeal to high-performing individuals, but because they also contribute to high- performance for organizations: 1. Encourage frequent rotation. CIA officers change assignments frequently. My own assign- ments have lasted everywhere from 60-day stints in war zones with minimal infrastructure to almost three years in a more stable position. Perhaps more important, each of my assign- ments was drastically different from the last. For a self-confessed job-hopper such as me, this was very appealing. There was little opportunity to get bored and ample opportunity to learn. High performers hate stagnant environments. Small companies in particular, though, fre- quently face headroom limitations that make upward mobility difficult. A company with on- ly six employees simply can’t justify promoting to the management ranks everyone who shows potential; to do so would result in a top-heavy, unproductive organization. However, allowing talented employees to move between departments, functions, and locations breeds a multidimensional workforce, and also helps to circulate knowledge and talent throughout your organization. It also keeps things interesting for your employees, who might How the CIA Keeps Employees Happy By J.C. Carleson | Employment |
  14. 14. 15 otherwise begin to feel stuck. The next item is related: 2. Be a résumé builder. Ironically, the best employers are often those who make it the easi- est to find work elsewhere. That’s because the top employers provide the best training op- portunities, the most challenging assignments, the most capable mentors, and the most di- verse experiences. The better and the more challenging the job, the better it makes as an entry on a résumé. It’s hard to beat “Clandestine Service Officer, Central Intelligence Agency” for an eyebrow- raising résumé entry. By becoming an employer recognizable in your own right for the quali- ty and talent of your workforce, though, you become more attractive not only to the top candidates, but also to your customers and clients. 3. Match the person, not the title, to the task. After I finished my year of training to become a clandestine service officer, I reported for my first day of work expecting not much more than instructions on where to find my desk and introductions to my new colleagues. I was stunned, then, when the first words out of my new boss’ mouth were, “Did you pass your fire- arms training?” I had--in fact, I had done surprisingly well for someone who doesn’t like guns--but I couldn’t imagine why she was asking. It turns out that she wanted me to head to Af- ghanistan. As soon as possible. It was not the first day on the job that I had anticipated, but this was shortly after 9/11, so I quickly agreed to go. If you are serious about attracting the top talent in your industry, you can’t afford to let your employees languish in unchallenging positions. Too often, employers recruit bright and tal- ented individuals, but then hesitate to give them any real responsibility until they are more “seasoned” or more senior in the organization. In the meantime, the talented recruits are bored out their minds and likely to spend their ample free time surfing the Internet for a bet- ter job. I’m not advocating that employers put untested new hires in situations where a beginner’s mistake could be costly for the organization. I do, however, believe that employees’ skills and abilities--not their seniority or job title--should determine who is best qualified for the highest-stakes assignments. When the CIA identifies a high-profile target, careful attention is given to selecting the right officer for the job. Consideration is given to language, nationality, personality, gender, age, and area of expertise. It does not always make sense for a 55-year-old English-speaking white male electrical engineer from Wisconsin to try to recruit a twenty something female hijab-wearing Middle Eastern student who speaks only Arabic, for example--even if the 55- year-old is a highly skilled senior officer. Human resource practices within the CIA are substantially different from those within a pri- How the CIA Keeps Employees Happy By J.C. Carleson | Employment |
  15. 15. 16 vate organization. Because of the nature of the work and the requirement for top-secret se- curity clearances, clandestine careers can be far more intrusive and emotionally involved than a typical nine-to-five job. Moreover, CIA officers are in demand from private-sector employers, and--yes-- sometimes even from foreign governments that are just as eager as we are to establish penetrations of their rival intelligence services. All the more reason, then, for the CIA to employ an organizational and personnel structure that facilitates critical work while simultaneously motivating and monitoring employee performance. Whether or not national security depends upon your organization’s success, your workforce can benefit from some of the CIA’s recruiting and organizational strategies. Whether you are hiring a CEO or a fry cook, you should have confidence that your selection process is fair, accurate, and effective. And once you have built an organization, you should put in place a structure that maximizes performance and attracts and retains top talent. ■ Excerpted from Work Like a Spy: Business Tips from a Former CIA Officer. Published by Portfolio/Penguin. Copyright J.C. Carleson, 2013. J.C. Carleson is a former undercover CIA officer and corporate strategy consultant. She spent nine years conducting clandestine operations around the globe before trading the real world of espionage for writing about espionage. How the CIA Keeps Employees Happy By J.C. Carleson | Employment |
  16. 16. 17 Originally published two years ago, the meat of this post remains newsworthy. All of the fal- deral surrounding employment branding is focused on active candidates. There is a deeper and more important conversation to be had about reaching passive candidates. These are the people who are working and have no idea that your company exists. The candidate universe has six major components:  Active (looking right now, shipping resumes)  Researching (Starting to look, no applications)  On Alert (willing to take a job if the right opportunity presents itself)  Less Than Happily Employed (unsatisfied but not looking)  Happily Employed (not looking)  Disenfranchised (gave up looking) Communicating the story behind your employment brand is done differently by segment. You might ask yourself whether you ever want to reach some of those segments. That’s a local decision. But, there are some you definitely want to reach who won’t know about your work with the other segments. Particularly in shortage environments, being known to people who currently aren’t in the market is really important. Having them think of you once they decide to enter the market is where you want to be. I like what NetTemps used to say: “While some think passive candidates include all qualified individuals who are not currently looking for a job, this is a wishful (almost delusional) way of looking at things. A passive candidate is someone who is not looking for a job, but would be open to taking one if the right opportunity came along. People who are happily employed and not open to taking a new job are not candidates for employ- ment, passive or otherwise-and you will have to wait until they have a very bad day at work before you can consider them a legitimate prospect.” Here’s the conventional wisdom about “passive candidates”.  Passive candidates are defined as candidates who are satisfied with their current posi- tion and are accomplishing great things. (Association for Automatic Identification and Mobility)  Passive candidates are not actively looking for a new position. They are satisfied in their current position. The best search firms are typically experts at engaging passive candi- dates in a 1:1 approach. (The Passive Candidate Mindset) Employment Branding for Passive Candidates By John Sumser, HR Examiner.com | Employment |
  17. 17. 18 Employment Branding for Passive Candidates By John Sumser, HR Examiner.com  You can’t recruit and hire passive candidates using the same workflow nor the same re- cruiters used for active candidates. (Lou Adler, ERE)  A passive candidate is a candidate who is not actively applying to open requisitions and who is employed. (Lindsey Gurian)  Passive candidates don’t need a ‘job’, they already have one. Passive candidates need to be offered opportunities which will allow them to change the trajectory of their ca- reer. This raises the bar and makes employer branding more important than ever be- fore. (Welcome to the Talent Economy by Daniel Shapero)  How to Be a Successful Passive Candidate: Constant Networking (Debra Feldman, the JobWhiz)  Sadly, the vast majority of applicants do not possess the skills you are looking for. They’re not even close. You see, the truly qualified individuals are busy working in their fields of expertise and will never see your ad. We call those people “passive candidates.” (Miller- Abrahamson) It’s simpler, really. Some of the experienced people who are already working in the industry don’t get jobs by sending out applications. The most important thing about ‘passive candidates’ isn’t that they are passive, it’s that they are qualified. When they want the next job, they network around the industry. When you want them to work for you before they’re ready to move, you network to them. There are no new entrants to the market who are experienced. As obvious as that is, it gets left out of the conversation all the time. People who are new apply for jobs one way. Peo- ple who are experienced do it differently. People who are really happy in their work don’t do it. If I am new to the business, I need your website to tell me about your cultural values, the good works you do, the heroic journey of your CEO and the visionary view that drives your work. If I am experienced, I learn about you at trade shows and from the woman two cubi- cles over who used to work for you. So, what is Employment Branding for seasoned professionals? Well, it isn’t glossy and full of advertising-speak. The employment branding task, when reaching out to experienced workers, is complicated territory that hasn’t been fully defined just yet. Here are some things to think about. | Employment |
  18. 18. 19 Employment Branding for Passive Candidates By John Sumser, HR Examiner.com 1. Communicating the company’s reputation in a way that is consonant with the market’s view. This is harder if the company has a bad reputation or is going through a rough patch. Attempts to repair a bad reputation have to be gradual and part of a long range plan. On the other hand, if the company has a stellar marketplace persona, re- cruiting gets accelerated. It’s easier to recruit experienced workers to Facebook than HP right now. 2. Understanding the company’s reputation requires constant market monitoring. Experi- enced people post reviews on Glassdoor. Inexperienced people read them. Experi- enced people don’t need to; they are plugged into the industry grapevine. 3. The more an industry relies on contractors and consultants (say Entertainment, Publishing, Banking, Healthcare), the more these itinerant workers control the company’s reputation in the marketplace. Managing the contractors’ perception of the company is the last thing on most supervisors’ minds. They’re the first people that experienced folks talk to about what it’s like over there. 4. Even if you have a crummy reputation, people will come to work for you if you offer them skills, money or big opportunities that they don’t currently have. Armed Forces are particularly good at this. 5. The important things about a company’s reputation vary. Everyone knows that Great Big Consulting Company X is a sweatshop. The insiders also know that 10 years of working for them enables you to write your own ticket. Experienced employees in your own company are the foundation of great employment branding in the industry. Figuring out how to collect and interpret their view of the firm is the first step. The Glassdoor data tells you what they are saying. That’s where you start. ■ John Sumser is the founder, principal author and editor-in-chief of the HRExamin- er Online Magazine. John explores the people, technology, ideas and careers of senior leaders in Human Resources and Human Capital. John is the also principal of Two Color Hat where he routinely advises Human Resources, Recruiting De- partments and Talent Management teams with product analysis, market segmentation, positioning, strategy and branding guidance. | Employment |
  19. 19. 20 Effective Recruiting Step 1: Meeting with the hiring manager By Marilyn Manzi, SF Workplace Examiner The first meeting with the hiring manager is fundamental. Asking the right questions will give you the information needed to create a matrix for sourcing. In preparation for the face-to- face with the hiring manager, read the job description thoroughly. Make connections about how the requirements play a role into the primary responsibilities. For example, you have been given the assignment to fill a Project Manager role. A general project manager requires attention to detail, strong interpersonal skills, and the ability to hold others accountable without being hostile. A strong understanding of the foundation of a project manager will allow you to ask “branch questions.” Meaning, there is the founda- tion/trunk that grounds all general job descriptions; learning how this Project Manager job differs from another Project Manager job is by asking branch questions. During your informational interview with a hiring manager, you would begin describing gen- eral foundation skills of a Project Manager role: For example, I understand that this person will be putting together material for employees to meet milestones and ensure success through strong interpersonal skills; however, it is unclear to me which departments this em- ployee will be engaging with in this role. The hiring manager may respond like this: We are seeking a Project Manager that has experience coding for front-end; has the ability to speak technical terms with the engineering team, design, product management, and high level executives. Utilize open-ended questions to keep the conversation fluid, such as: “If you were to hire someone today for this role, what would success look like 3 months from now?” Once you have gathered as much information as possible in 15-30 minutes, it is highly recommended to implement a reflection process immediately after speaking with the hiring manager. Post It Exercise: Take out Post-It notes and write 1-3 words on each note. The words will be derived notes taken with hiring manager; categorize these Post-Its. For example, you have “2-3 years experience,” “retail experience,” “digital background,” “graduated with a de- gree in Computer Science” on 4 separate Post-It notes. To simplify the details, create two categories including: “2-3 years experience in digital retail” & “Computer Science or related degree” This will be two of your “must haves” as you create a matrix for sourcing. In sum, it is important to ask the right questions and have a lot of details to categorize, sim- plify, and include in your matrix. Streamlining information will give you control and compre- hension of what the hiring manager is looking for on a clear and concise level. Marilyn Dyan Manzi, MA, is the Talent Acquisition Manager @ Westfield Labs & a regis- tered Marriage and Family Therapist intern with the Board of Behavioral Sciences. In her specialty as a Recruiter, she applies her learned skills as a psychotherapist to her practice in observing employee behavior, creating a sourcing matrix, phone screening, in person interviewing, onboarding, and understanding what retains employees. | Recruiting & Sourcing |
  20. 20. 21 Effective Recruiting Step 2: Creating a sourcing matrix By Marilyn Manzi, SF Workplace Examiner The role of a Talent Acquisition Manager at a startup can become overwhelming if you do not utilize reflection for samples of your populated results. It is important to try different methods of sourcing to obtain desired outcomes. The sourcing matrix is crucial for targeting your desired audience, measuring your data, and keeping a record for future opportunities. Please refer to “Step 1” of the recruiting process before moving onto the following infor- mation. Gather your “must haves” from the Post-It exercise results from "Step 1" and list horizontally across row 2 on an Excel spreadsheet; refer to picture attached for visual description. No- tice, each column includes separate boxes that are complementary components of your matrix for sourcing potential candidates. Preferred sourcing platform: LinkedIn Recruiter In LinkedIn Recruiter, there is an advanced search option to utilize Boolean search method. Input your manual matrix located on your Excel spreadsheet (use quotations for exact re- sults): · “investment banking” AND “market analysis” AND “business development” AND excel AND (methodical OR analytical OR systematic). *I excluded “SF Bay Area” and “Ivy League University” because LinkedIn offers a checkbox for refining these two components. · Run search=populated results based on your created matrix; great job for making it to this level; you are well on your way! Once you reach your results, you can refine the process. Select both “SF Bay Area” and Ivy League graduates by checking the desired list of schools. Sort through and ensure your re- sults meet your requirements. In sum, learning how to source efficiently comes with refinement; if your matrix is not provid- ing you with effective results: step back and reflect on each component; is there anything I can do to make this more clear or concise? Once you have your list of potential candidates, your goal is to achieve at least a 20% re- sponse rate. Step 3, we will learn how to create an email template encompassing human emotion VS. spam. | Recruiting & Sourcing |
  21. 21. 22 Effective Recruiting Step 3: Creating an email template By Marilyn Manzi, SF Workplace Examiner Software Engineers, Visual Designers, and UX Designers are in high demand. Hooking a can- didate that is contacted multiple times a week requires communication that grabs their at- tention. Create an email template that is general enough and allows you to manipulate a couple of sentences in order to tailor it to your recipient. Personalizing your message will give you a much higher ROI. Include personal information that is specific enough to hook the candidate. For example, choosing a book: You will more than likely purchase a book by reading the back cover, the first few pages, or someone you trust refers you the book. Your potential candidates will buy your message if you raise their interest level high enough to respond. The introduction sentence should entail something like this: “I am struck by your education in x and how it plays into your career now. It may not have much correlation or a lot and curious to understand through your shoes is probably difficult to comprehend via LinkedIn research.” After you have hooked the candidate’s interest level, transition into your idea of how you believe they could be a fit for the role. For example, “It appears that you have the ability to create harmony in your work environment based on having experience as a manager.” At this point, you have hooked the candidate and opened their mind to the idea of the po- sition you are about to pitch. Before describing the position, introduce the culture of the company. For example, “I thought of you because x company is a great place to work be- cause the team is x. The next goal is to relieve the reader of pressure. This will allow the reader to remain open- minded and spare 15 minutes to speak with you. For example, “I am not trying to sell you on this job or be pushy. I just thought of you for this role and can be more strategic in what you are truly seeking in a position, if any. You may be happy where you are and cheers if that is the case. If you are thinking about a change of environment, please read the job descrip- tion here:” In sum, one way to create a successful email template includes a personal hook, a real ex- ample of how the candidate's experience matches the position you are pitching, descrip- tion of the company, and remaining neutral in your closing paragraph. | Recruiting & Sourcing |
  22. 22. 23 Effective Recruiting Step 4: Phone Screen By Marilyn Manzi, SF Workplace Examiner The hook email, caught the attention of a passive candidate. Your created “hook” email is important because it is the first attempt at opening a door to this candidate’s interest level. The hook email template will serve both rapport building and time efficiency, if emailed, thoughtfully. You have met with the hiring manager, created a matrix for sourcing, an email template with plug in spaces, have your applicant tracking system in place, and you are ready for screening these candidates on the phone. Double-check the background of your hooked candidate; is the candidate qualified according to your sourcing matrix? Ask yourself what is unclear while comparing their background to the matrix before scheduling a phone screen. Creating questions that are tailored to the candidate is essential for a successful phone screen. Your questions should be 50% qualifying within the matrix and the other 50%, behav- ior related. Placing candidates in front of hiring managers represents you; surprise the hiring manager with your ability to match complementing personalities. To hold the interest of the candidate during the phone screen, ask questions about the candidate's career passions, initially. Utilize the art of open-ended questions; asking “yes” or “no” questions sets you up for limited information. Body language is a key element to under- standing a candidate's truth to what they are saying; however, over the phone you want to pay attention to voice tone. For example, does the candidate have a flat affect when talk- ing about their current responsibilities? If you notice their voice become more passionate discussing certain responsibilities, focus on those when you are selling the position. If you have the candidate's needs understood, you can frame the position into an appealing per- spective. Your introductory questions will entail gathering information related to their career vision. Reflect back what you heard from the candidate to allow the words to be heard and un- derstood; this is how the candidate will begin to relax and be more authentic with you. Af- ter your reflective listening skills paid off, provide a summary of the company’s vision and highlight what would be appealing to the candidate's goals. Ensure that the candidate un- derstands the information you have relayed by asking how they understand the vision; again, reflective listening is key. If the candidate practices reflective listening, this is a strong interpersonal skill; you want candidates that have this ability. During the phone screen, be sure to confirm the following: 1) Authorized to work in the Unit- ed States. 2) Double check your matrix; does this candidate meet each “must have?” 3) Candidate’s availability for a phone interview; document at least 3 different time/day op- tions. | Recruiting & Sourcing |
  23. 23. 24 Effective Recruiting Step 4: Phone Screen By Marilyn Manzi, SF Workplace Examiner Set aside a window of time each day to complete phone screens including a 5 minute break to take fresh notes for each candidate. The habit of a scheduled window allows you to analyze how many phone screens you are completing within a consistent time frame. ■ | Recruiting & Sourcing | Reach over 5,000 HR & Recruiting Professionals! Promote your agency, products & services in our next 2015 edition of Who’s Who in High Tech Recruiting Guidebook For more information, please contact us at sponsor@enetrecruiter.com. Create a FREE account on enetRecruiter.com to find and connect with high tech recruiting professionals.
  24. 24. 25 How HubSpot’s First VP of Engineering Made Their First 40 Technical Hires By Entelo.com The following is an exclusive interview with Yoav Shapira, HubSpot's 1st VP of Engineering. Entelo sat down with their former Vice President of Engineering to learn his tactics for hiring and scaling a talented tech team — all from the ground up. Between 2007-2012, Shapira was a core member of HubSpot’s management team, serving as vice president of the engineering and the platform strategy teams. He arrived to Hub- Spot only a year after the company was founded, and led the hiring initiatives to build a ro- bust department of engineers, product managers, and designers. By the time he left the company in 2012, HubSpot’s product and engineering team had grown at an exponential rate. In its early stages, HubSpot boasted a grand total of 10 em- ployees. These days, the company that spearheaded inbound marketing SaaS under the same name, is made up of over 500 team members. Despite working with underqualified recruiters and their sub-par candidate recs, Shapira customized HubSpot’s tech hiring using one key rule to not only filter out bad candidates, but also less-than-stellar tech recruiters. Entelo: You hired employees 4-40 for the HubSpot tech team, which included designers, product managers, and engineers. What were some differences between how you ap- proached hiring employees for the product and engineering teams? Yoav: With product, we were lucky that we had these other groups like the IMCs, consult- ants, account managers, because we had these people who were forced to learn our methodology and our points from the beginning and they had at least a few months of get- ting to know our customers and their goals, their complaints and their pains, which made them really good candidate PMs. What we had to screen for was wattage, organization skills, being detail-oriented, and communication skills with engineers, whereas if you had to go to the outside world, you sort of have to look for a bunch of different things. A lot of those were pretty filtered for us. I also hired QA (quality assurance)/test engineers. We tried slotting them into teams, then investing more in test automation and creating a team for that. The latter worked much better than the former. Manual QA is a thing of the past. | Recruiting & Sourcing |
  25. 25. 26 How HubSpot’s First VP of Engineering Made Their First 40 Technical Hires By Entelo.com Where did you find most of the engineers you’d bring in for interviews? Referrals. At that point, the team I was supervising, that referrals worked best. This started when we had 15 or 20 people who were at least a couple of years in. We went from the Paul English playbook, where every couple months to three months, I called people on the team and I said, “Who’s the best person you’ve ever worked with who you haven’t referred yet?” and I would follow up with those candidates. At that point, we could also afford to fly people in for interviews, which we couldn’t afford at first and if it came down to it, we could also afford to relocate them. We switched from a mix that was mostly recruiters, to probably 75% referrals, and some recruiters were always in the mix. There was a big evolution. We didn’t have big network, so we hired a lot of contingency re- cruiters. At first, we turned to these recruiters because they sent us that candidate. Then we put in place the “three strikes and you’re out” rule. If a recruiter sent us three candidates that we didn’t hire, we stopped the relationship. And they knew this upfront. I’d tell recruit- ers what we were looking for, and then gave them feedback on what was good and what was bad about every candidate. Then you ended up with two contingency recruiters who were great at their jobs. What’d you like about them? These recruiters either owned or co-owned the firm that they worked with, and weren’t just normal employees of a big staffing agency. There was an incentive in being more relation- ship-oriented, less transactional, and more responsive to our feedback. You’ll tell a lot of recruiters that you’re looking for a specific engineer candidate. They’ll pre- tend they understand, and send you someone completely different. So you tell them, “Nope. This was not the person I was looking for,” and send you someone very similar the next day. Importantly, I spent the time giving them careful, detailed feedback on each candidate, good and bad. Well beyond just a cursory "nope." If I spend the time giving the feedback (not to mention interviewing the candidate in the first place), they best well listen. Those guys make money on a contingency basis because if they don’t make successful re- ferrals, they don’t make any money. In-house recruiters tend to be mediocre. | Recruiting & Sourcing |
  26. 26. 27 How HubSpot’s First VP of Engineering Made Their First 40 Technical Hires By Entelo.com With that said, when companies get bigger, they hire in-house recruiters, because they think they need to have someone dedicated to this and they need recruiters to coordinate and process candidates. Shortly after I left, HubSpot hired at least one in-house recruiter. Now I think they have multiple full-time in-house recruiters. Engineers still do most of the interview- ing, but recruiters coordinate the whole process. We never did that while I was there. We tried recruiting on general job boards, then moved on to more category-specific ones like Stack Overflow, 37Signals (now Basecamp), Joel on Software, and Authentic Jobs. There was a lot of noise, bad candidates, unqualified people, and some of them came from agencies. Then we did a lot of stuff around Craigslist and LinkedIn. We split-tested a lot of ad copy with short and long job descriptions that were heavy on ninjas and rock stars and tried out more traditional copy, too. Those had mixed results. These job boards, contingency recruiters — no matter what, when you had someone’s info put in front of you, what info was given to you upfront and was it actually valuable? Do peo- ple just give you a resume, and you had to do research on them? Yup, I usually got a resume by default. I would go through sites like Google, LinkedIn, GitHub, or Open Source to find out what I could about the candidate. What was the standard operating procedure to find a developer? Would you go to GitHub, Stack Overflow, or were there some sites better than others? I love it when a candidate has their own website. My site is a one-page static site that links to everything, but I’d love for them to have a domain. It’s okay if it’s white labeled, but hav- ing a domain is a good sign. Recruiters can recognize a digital native when they have their own domain. I’d look for that in their emails, too. If they had john@johnsmith.com on their resume, it’s better than john- smith@gmail.com. I don’t care where it goes to behind the scenes, but good candidates demonstrate they’re digital natives. I do look for a LinkedIn profile, that’s pretty standard. But these days and even then, which was maybe three to five years ago, I was okay if a candidate didn’t have a great LinkedIn profile. LinkedIn is not what it used to be. Everyone is gravitating towards social media sites, like Facebook, and there's less separation between personal and professional. | Recruiting & Sourcing |
  27. 27. 28 How HubSpot’s First VP of Engineering Made Their First 40 Technical Hires By Entelo.com I look at GitHub, Apache, Mozilla, and other open source contributions anywhere I can find them. I’ve never really looked at Google+, but if they have that, that’s okay, too. If they have code, I look at the code itself. I want them to, at least, have some sort of online pro- file, personal website, or portfolio. That’s huge. One issue we’ve heard people run into is they’ll see people have large presences on GitHub, and they have a lot of commits to open source repositories, but when we bring them into interview, they’re not actually good at writing code. Is there a quick way to audit someone’s coding chops? I might have only seen that happen only once or twice, so it’s pretty rare when it happens, but it does happen. At HubSpot, the first interviewing round, even if you had a lot of open source, included a coding challenge that any candidate could do remotely. We also screened for factors like cultural fit and a candidate's interest in the company's mission. We’d do the coding challenge with a shared Google Doc — one person writes code and the other person can see it. We also used similar tools like FizzBuzz and see[Mike]code, which anyone should be able to test with whether or not they have open source contribu- tions before they come into the office. And by the way, every single time we skipped that test because someone was really senior, we almost always regretted it. Good candidates crush that test, and they don’t mind it. How would that change if you were looking for a product level or a design person. For a de- signer, would you look at their visual portfolio and that’s it? With a designer, it’s a little more subjective. You look at their visual portfolio if they have one, and you hope you like it. Even if I don’t like it, I still try to understand how they got their design, which you can do again with Google Docs or over the phone. You could both look at the portfolio at the same time, pick one of their projects and ask, “Tell me how this came about.” Hopefully they can explain an evolution that shows they took into account users’ needs, did some market research, looked at comparables, and ended up with something. If they have something that’s well-rationalized and well- supported, even if I don’t like it visually, at least that makes sense, and that’s good. | Recruiting & Sourcing |
  28. 28. 29 How HubSpot’s First VP of Engineering Made Their First 40 Technical Hires By Entelo.com With product candidates, it’s actually similar, but a little more abstract. On their resume, you look for an achievement and hope they can explain how they got there. I’d say, “Oh you increased this feature from this adoption to that adoption. Tell me how that came about. Tell me how you prioritized your road map." Stuff like that. But the initial screening stage is harder with product people than it is with developers. For product people, especially a good referral from someone who says, “Hey, I worked with this person. They’re smart, worked hard, worked fast,” we’ll bring them in to interview them in-person because it’s hard to do a quick, efficient screening over the phone. Did diversity hiring among the engineering and product teams ever come up in manage- ment meetings? Yes, not in every single management meeting, but it came up when we were recruiting and looking at our pipeline. We were actively thinking, “How do we find more minority candi- dates?” We never actually solved that nugget that well, but we always wanted to. I would love to find more qualified minority candidates. All the research is there that shows that di- versity on the team is great for a company. Diversity hiring came up regularly, and we never had a good solution. What are a couple of things you tried that didn’t work very well? We sponsored a Python for Women workshop at our office, which brought a bunch of wom- en to learn how to code. It seemed like a good idea, but they were too beginner. They may have been at a better level maybe two or three years down the road. We also told our recruiters, obviously, we’d love to have more minority candidates. That did- n’t help much. I don’t think we tried to tweak our job board ad copy to target minorities. That could’ve been interesting. It’s hard to do it in a legal way, but we never really tried. What do you think disconnect was? There weren’t a lot of great examples of things you could do to find more candidates. There wasn’t even evidence that the candidates were there. It’s not like there was a place we knew of that had 50% of the team who were women. Otherwise, I would’ve tried to reach out and ask them, “How did you make that happen?” But we didn’t know of any such place, a comparable or company that was really good. | Recruiting & Sourcing |
  29. 29. 30 How HubSpot’s First VP of Engineering Made Their First 40 Technical Hires By Entelo.com Let’s say you could go back and talk to the HubSpot management team on recruiting on your first day. Advice? Invest more in co-op programs. We did a little bit of the Northeastern co-ops, and I would’ve done more. You get them for about six months, not just three, and that’s enough time to shape and mold them, and that’s a big difference. I’m sure Northeastern may be relatively unique, and I’m sure that’s not the only school that has co-ops programs. Find other co-ops nationwide and really recruit hard at those places, as opposed to just MIT or Harvard or whatever. Find schools that have co-ops, grab as many smart cohorts as you can, and teach them for about six months. Your goal should be to hire them as full-time em- ployees. That’ll fill all your entry-level, junior-level recruiting needs potentially forever with scalable approach. One piece of advice for recruiters trying to place folks on engineering teams? Learn how to code just so you can do the screening more efficiently. And, like everyone says, quality over quantity is true at all levels, even college recruiting. If you talk to executive recruiters, like really high end — “Help-me-find-the-CFO” sort of recruiters — those guys know it’s quality over quantity. I don’t know why the people who are recruiting at the junior or mid-levels think that it’s a volume business. It’s not. If you give me one awesome perfect candidate that I’m likely to hire every three months for a year, I would love you, Mr. Recruiter, and keep paying you and be happy about it. But they try to scam me with all these people for entry-level jobs, and that sucks. I want you to actually do the filtering and funneling for me in an efficient way. Yoav Shapira is currently the Vice President of Product Management at Jana, a mobile tech platform founded in 2009 with global customers, including Microsoft, Google, Unilever, P&G, Johnson & Johnson, Nestlé, Danone, and General Mills. Thanks, Yoav, for the insight! As he mentioned, recruiters' referral networks are one of the best sources for finding top candidates. ■ Entelo gives companies a competitive advantage in building great teams. The Entelo plat- form leverages big data, predictive analytics and social signals to help recruiting organiza- tions find, qualify and engage with in-demand talent. To learn how leading companies like ESPN, Facebook, GE, and Salesforce are building their teams using Entelo, visit www.entelo.com | Recruiting & Sourcing |
  30. 30. 31 The CEO of an emerging growth company called me a while ago, a bit shocked after hav- ing seen the employment contracts that had just been issued to a couple of new hires in Hong Kong. “How could they be longer than mine!? Are you sure that is the approach we should take as we expand our operations?” This CEO, like many US executives, employment lawyers and HR representatives, is accus- tomed to one- or two-page US-style at-will offer letters. But in many jurisdictions around the world,. detailed employment agreements are not only customary and best practices, but are simply required. In fact, as foreign companies expand into the US, we see the reverse phenomenon – foreign companies rolling out foreign-style employment agreements to US- based regular employees, thus losing the benefits of the unique concept of at-will employ- ment in the US. Against this background, here are ten important pitfalls to be aware of as you develop your global employment documentation: 1. You don’t use a contract. Outside the United States, your employees will expect a con- tract – and might sue if they don’t get one! Written employment agreements are best prac- tices and they can incorporate crucial terms such as probationary periods, termination grounds, or working time provisions. In fact, many jurisdictions require written employment agreements. In China, for instance, a company that fails to issue a written employment agreement within one month of the commencement date will be subject to double wage claims. In the European Union, under Directive 91/533/EEC, an employer is required to in- form its employees of all relevant terms of the employment relationship within two months of commencement of employment; commonly, this information is provided in the employ- ment agreement. Several EU member states have more stringent requirements. 2. You fail to protect your company by including probationary periods and proper termina- tion provisions. Given the lack of at-will employment, probationary periods are crucial out- side the United States. Each country has different rules on the maximum duration of a pro- bationary period, whether renewals are permissible, etc. (e.g., Germany permits a six-month probationary period, China six months for open-term contracts, but only one month for fixed-term contracts of less than one year, and two months for contracts longer than one year). If you include a probationary period, make sure to make any termination decisions before expiration of the probationary period. In various jurisdictions, termination provisions are crucial as well. While they may not always give a company full protection (since ulti- mately, it is statutory restrictions that determine in which instances terminations are permissi- ble), they often give a company at least a good starting point to enforce a termination (e.g., in case of violation of company policies such as a code of conduct). 3. You don’t think strategically when it comes to employment contracts. One size does not |Employment| Top 10 Pitfalls in Managing Employment Contracts as You Go Global By Ute Krudewagen, Partner at DLA Piper
  31. 31. 32 fit all. Before you embark on drafting employment agreements for your international opera- tions, think through the strategy you want to use. The most common approach is to pre- pare a local-law-compliant employment agreement in line with best practices and the standard approach of the specific jurisdiction where you hire. Some companies feel strong- ly about global consistency, though, and would rather create a “global” template that would only be localized as necessary under local laws. One hybrid approach is to agree on company-specific clauses (such as references to specific global policies and commission plan or bonus language – keeping in mind that internationally, once granted, variable compensation is hard to take away or amend) to include in any agreement globally, while otherwise working off local templates. Also consider the interrelationship between your contract and policies. In some jurisdictions, it is advisable to incorporate relevant handbook policies in the contract (e.g., in the UK you need to mention disciplinary and grievance procedures). Having policies incorporated (e.g., data protection) can also often protect the company if claims are brought to show the employee was aware of procedures. Finally, do not forget data privacy considera- tions. Consider, for instance, whether you need consent to the transfer of personal data in the employment agreement, or a standalone data privacy notice. 4. You don’t properly address assignment of intellectual property. Keeping your intellectual property safe starts from day one. Have you considered how to address IP assignment? If there is a standard proprietary information and inventions assignment agreement (PIIA) you want to use, this must be localized under local laws. Sometimes, specific policies and pro- cedures are required. In China, for instance, absent company rules on payments made for employee-created patents, a company will end up paying an amount determined under statutory rules. In Russia, trade secrets must be specifically outlined in a company trade se- crets regime or those trade secrets will not enjoy protection. 5. You use the wrong employing entity. Make sure your employees (and the government and courts) know who’s the boss. A common mistake is to print the employment agreement on the parent company’s letterhead, or to include the parent company as employer of record in the contract. This is only accurate where that company in fact acts as the em- ploying entity (which is not feasible in some jurisdictions, like Brazil, Mexico or Russia). Where you have set up an international structure of local subsidiaries, these should be expressly in- dicated to be the employing entity, or you risk joint employer liability and permanent estab- lishment exposure of the employing entity, thus obliterating all the tax planning the compa- ny has done. One exception to this rule: if stock option grants are made in a parent com- pany, that company should be issuing the stock award documentation. 6. You use the wrong template. Which template to use is not determined by the employing entity, but by the jurisdiction in which the employee performs his or her services. While most |Employment| Top 10 Pitfalls in Managing Employment Contracts as You Go Global By Ute Krudewagen, Partner at DLA Piper
  32. 32. 33 jurisdiction recognize the principle of choice of applicable law, this is usually overridden by considerations of public policy, and employees are almost always deemed protected (for example, see Article 8 of the Rome Convention). Accordingly, an employee in France should receive a French law-governed employment agreement, even if the employee works for a UK employing entity. Otherwise, the employee could enjoy the best of both worlds (in this example, UK contractual rules, plus French statutory rules). Also, templates for specific individuals or situations should be used where appropriate, such as fixed-term employment agreements (where permissible), managing director or entrust- ment agreements (e.g., in Germany or Japan for certain individuals in corporate roles), or agree- ments with specific working time provisions depending upon level of the employee. 7. You fail to translate your contract. No surprise, but employees should be able to under- stand their agreement or it will not be enforced against them. It is always fascinating when employees who used to be fluent in English during their entire employment relationship seem to have lost their ability to communicate in that lan- guage when it comes to bringing a termination lawsuit. In- deed, many jurisdictions (such as Belgium, France or Poland) require employment agreements to be in the local language, even for an employee fluent in a foreign language. Absent that, the agreement will not be enforceable (at least not against the employee). 8. You insert unenforceable non-compete provisions. You may think US state-to-state rules are confusing, but it gets much more interesting abroad. Rules on post-termination restrictive covenants vary significantly from jurisdiction to jurisdic- tion, with many following a general reasonableness approach (as in Australia, the United Arab Emirates or the UK), others prohibiting them outright (e.g., India, Mexico and Russia) and yet another set of jurisdictions requiring specific payouts for post-termination non- competes (e.g., China, France and Germany). If you include such provisions in your em- ployment agreement or PIIA, ensure that you understand the legal requirements. For in- stance, in Germany, once included, a post-termination non-compete can only be terminat- ed with a one-year advance waiver, or the company will end up paying the mandatory 50 percent post-termination non-compete compensation even if it has no desire in enforcing the provision. |Employment| Top 10 Pitfalls in Managing Employment Contracts as You Go Global By Ute Krudewagen, Partner at DLA Piper
  33. 33. 34 9. You don’t issue your contract on time. Often, some delay is not a big deal, but there are jurisdictions (most often in the common law context) in which a valid contract is predicated not only on offer and acceptance, but also payment of a consideration, and these actions must happen within the proper timeframe. For example, if an employee in Canada receives his or her employment agreement after having commenced employment, then that em- ployee will not be technically bound by the agreement, since no additional consideration was provided for the contractual restrictions set out in the contract. Ongoing employment is not sufficient. 10. You let your contracts become stale. Last but not least, keep in mind that laws change, as do your company’s practices. Implement a process to regularly review your template agreements and make sure they still provide you the best protection possible. ■ Ute Krudewagen is a partner in DLA Piper's global employment group. She handle issues around the world wherever her clients have a global workforce, including in Asia Pacific, Europe, the Americas, and the Middle East. She clients range from start-up companies just "going global" to established mul- tinational companies with a large and varied global workforce in industries such as IT, fashion/retail, oil/gas, manufacturing, etc. You can find Ute’s blog on global employment and labor law at www.internationalemploymentlawyer.com. |Employment| Top 10 Pitfalls in Managing Employment Contracts as You Go Global By Ute Krudewagen, Partner at DLA Piper
  34. 34. 35 Are you finding yourself in an MBA recruitment comfort zone? Skilled MBA candidates can be found at every graduate business school, regardless of size, rank and location. Many employers limit their recruitment efforts by singling out schools in their “backyard”, focusing on a small number of top ranked business schools, sticking to old habits, or simply recruiting from the alma maters of their senior executives year-after-year. As recruiters look to find the leadership candidate "needle in the recruitment haystack," a diversified search can help them discover high potential candidate sets they would have otherwise missed. Any graduate business school student is ahead of the game, going above and beyond in pursuit of higher education in preparation for the future. Value isn’t always defined by a “top five” reputation. Take a lesson from some of the most well-known names in business: McKinsey and Amazon. McKinsey, the world renowned consulting firm, is always on the lookout for exceptional can- didates worldwide. Brian Rolfes, Director of Global Recruiting, explains that “there is no McKinsey ‘type,’ (…) Our culture is defined by the diversity of our people and the strength of our values.” Seeking “people who thrive in a fast-changing environment”, Amazon recruits talent from a wide range of locations. According to CNN Money, last year the tech firm hosted over 170 interns from more than two dozen business schools. By strategically sourcing talent from a larger pool of candidates online, virtual recruitment allows companies to explore MBA talent across the board. Instead of narrowing a search by school or location, recruiters can use a global search to discover valuable candidates based off of their experiences, skills, preferences, group involvement, etc. Whether a job re- quires a Mandarin speaking consultant with a marketing background, or a French speaking financial advisor from the west coast, the comprehensive MBA Focus database and its ad- vanced search capabilities will help you extend your reach to business leaders from more than 75 leading graduate business schools around the world. ■ |Recruiting & Sourcing| Broaden Your MBA Talent Search By MBA Focus
  35. 35. 36 LaBine & Associates Specialize in IT and Sales San Mateo, CA Laura LaBine is a Recruiting Specialist based in the San Francisco Bay Area, bringing over ten years of experience in the staffing/recruiting industry. Her company helps small and medium size businesses grow, working closely with them to find a solution that best matches their needs. LaBine believes in delivering high touch customer service with a commitment to excellence. With a team of recruiters at her side, LaBine remains hands on at performing expert-level sourcing of top talent through the Internet, cold calls, writing and placing ads, networking, and employee referrals to find de- sired prospects with the negotiation and people skills to retain such individuals. We Specialize In The Following: Industries Start ups, Small Businesses, Service Companies, Manufacturing Companies. Function  IT, Sales, Operations, Web, Marketing and Administrative roles. General Service Area  North America, CA Laura LaBine, Chief Talent Officer http://www.LaBineAndAssociates.com 1-650- 577-5954 Laura@LaBineAndAssociates.com |Featured Recruiter|
  36. 36. 37 GDI Infotech IT Consulting and Staffing Ann Arbor, MI GDI Infotech offers IT Solutions for Information Management and Information Technology Consulting Services. GDI uses the innovative InfoReady Platform to offer information discov- ery and collaboration solutions to bring people and critical information together for valua- ble results. GDI's flexible delivery models include onsite staffing, offsite project services, and offshore development. While GDI has adapted and changed with the introduction of new technological demands, our commitment to customer service and value-added delivera- bles has never faltered. We Specialize In The Following: Industries  Technology Industries Function  Information Technology General Service Area  North America, MI Cory Cooper, PHR www.gdii.com 1-734-477-6900 cory@gdii.com |Featured Recruiter|
  37. 37. 38 Hatstand Ltd. Financial IT Consultancy New York, NY Hatstand is a global IT consultancy that works within investment banking focusing on trading systems, connectivity, data management and regulatory change; with offices in London, Geneva, New York, Hong Kong and Singapore. • Full life-cycle staffing from sourcing through offer negotiation for front-office IT consulting roles in the investment banking industry • Partnered with external hiring managers to assess staffing needs and define requirements for open positions • Quickly adapted to US market and competitive investment banking industry We Specialize In The Following: Industries Financial Markets Function  Financial IT General Service Area  North America, NY Bram Spiessens, Resourcing & Selection Executive www.hatstand.com 1-212-918-4568 info@hatstand.com |Featured Recruiter|
  38. 38. 39 Kismet Staffing Recruiting for Technology Companies Portland, OR Recruiting for technology companies nationwide. Experienced in locating specialized talent for technical, scientific and executive positions. Particular expertise in the scientific technol- ogies industries: Battery, Power, Semiconductors, Precision Engineering, Chemical, Biotech, Solar. I've happily placed candidates in roles such as: Senior Software/Controls Engineers, Assem- bly Technicians, Senior Mechanical Engineers, Power Device Engineer, Lithium-Ion Battery Engineer, Senior Electro-Mechanical Engineer, Principal Mechanical Engineer (Plasma), Prin- cipal Solar Process Engineer, Senior Systems Engineer, Director of Engineering, Staff Process Engineer (CMOS), Ion Implant Scientist, and Director Systems Design. We Specialize In The Following: Industries  Semiconductor, Mechanical, Industrial Engineering, Consumer Electronics, Nanotechnology, Renewable Energy, Manufacturing, Professional Services Function  Engineering, Technical Roles General Service Area  North America, OR Molly Eaton, Owner/Principal Recruiter www.kismetstaffing.com 1-971-207-5572 molly@kismetstaffing.com |Featured Recruiter|
  39. 39. 40 Michael Page Nick Powell, Executive Director Contingent and Retained Recruitment San Francisco, Bay Area, CA Michael Page is one of the world's leading professional recruitment consultancies, specializing in the place- ment of candidates in permanent, contract, temporary and interim positions with clients all over the world and has grown by organic expansion rather than through mergers or acquisitions. Established as a specialist recruiter in 1976, PageGroup has expanded rapidly over the past 36 years and now has 155 global offices in 36 countries. While size has its advantages, it doesn't define us - the nature of our organic growth means that each new of- fice is integrated into the region that it serves. It also means that as an employer looking to hire, or as a candi- date aiming to grow your career you have the best of both worlds; a team that understands the market and geography you operate in, plus the resources and expertise of an international network at your disposal. PageGroup’s strategy remains consistent: organic growth by region and discipline, focusing on growth mar- kets, development of home-grown management expertise and a structure that champions our own talent. Our San Francisco office opened in 2011, serving Michael Page’s growing client base and bridges the gap in demand for professional recruitment solutions in the Western United States. We Specialize In The Following: Industries  Technology & Financial Sectors Function  Sales & Marketing, Accounting & Finance, Engineering General Service Area  North America, CA Nick Powell, Executive Director www.michaelpage.com 1-415-926-7401 npowell@michaelpage.us.com |Featured Recruiter|
  40. 40. 41 Talent Avenue Creative Talent Staffing San Francisco, Bay Area, CA This isn’t some stuffy, corporate recruiting firm. Talent Avenue leads to great jobs. And, it’s the shortcut to finding great talent. We meet face-to-face with all talent. UI, UX, art directors, copywriters, producers/project managers, graphic designers, design directors, creative directors, account managers, smart thinkers and great presenters. From junior, mid, senior and awesome, etc. , we know good people at every level. Our staff has experience at Communication Arts, Venables Bell & Partners, Butler Shine Stern & Partners, Yelp and many other creative shops and booming startups. We will help you find Freelance, Freelance to Fulltime, Direct Hire and Internships. We Specialize In The Following: Industries Advertising, Marketing, Creative & Production, Interactive/Entertainment Function  Creative roles such as Art Director, Design Director, Graphics Designer, Production Artist, Production Director, Web Designer, Web Developer, Ad Account Director, Marketing Manager, Public Relations Manager General Service Area  North America, CA Jessica Cizek, Account Manager www.talentavenue.com 1-415-814-2770 Jessica@talentavenue.com |Featured Recruiter|
  41. 41. 42 GreeneSearch, Inc. Specialize in Engineering and Product Manager Roles San Mateo, CA Founded in 2004, we provide the level of professionalism, industry experience and career guidance technology professionals should expect when seeking a new opportunity. GreeneSearch works directly with leading venture capital firms to help build their technical teams for premier and emerging enterprise software, online consumer, mobile and gaming companies. We have a combined 40 years of technology industry experience in engineering, marketing and business development, which gives us first-hand knowledge of the technology market. We Specialize In The Following: Industries  Information Technology, Computer Software, Software Development Function  Information Technology, Engineering, Product Management General Service Area  North America, CA Rob Greene, CEO www.greenesearch.com 1-650-817-5300 jobs@greenesearch.com |Featured Recruiter|
  42. 42. 43 Randstad USA Joseph Sciscione, Technical Recruiter Greater New York City Area, NJ For more than 25 years, Randstad Technologies has been connecting companies around the world to customized technology solutions that meet and surpass objectives. We com- bine our deep industry expertise with our broad range of full-service capabilities - recruit- ment, consulting, projects, outsourcing - to deliver the right fit to our clients and candidates. From recruitment to technology solutions aimed at protecting and maximizing the value of technology investments, we power our clients' success - and drive our candidates' growth. Randstad is a $22.0 billion global provider of HR services and the second largest staffing or- ganization in the world. From temporary staffing to permanent placement to in-house, pro- fessionals, search & selection, and HR Solutions, Randstad holds top positions around the world and has approximately 29,300 corporate employees and around 4,500 branches and in-house locations in 39 countries around the world. We Specialize In The Following: Industries  Information Technology, Finance Function  Business Analysis, Data Management, Project Manager, Software and Application Developer General Service Area  North America, NJ Joseph Sciscione, Technical Recruiter http://technologies.randstadusa.com/ 1-732-623-5929 joseph.sciscione@randstadusa.com |Featured Recruiter|
  43. 43. 44 Goldstrike! Ken Reed, Founder San Francisco Bay Area, CA Ken Reed founded Goldstrike in 2013, after building two previous successful recruiting firms that focused on engineering, high-tech and Asia/Pacific. His first firm, TKO Personnel, ran 17 years, through the purchase by NASDAQ-traded Hall Kinion. His second firm, TKO Phoenix, focused only on overseas recruiting. Goldstrike is a new firm that builds on the successes and lessons learned over 25 years of recruiting and combines recruiting in North America and overseas markets. We Specialize In The Following: Industries  The hardware, IT and systems engineers who build the key technologies and devices that enable today’s ‘internet everywhere’ revolution. Function  Engineers and managers for US SME’ (small to medium enterprises) entering or ex- panding in Asia/Pacific countries. General Service Area  North America, CA and Asia Pacific Ken Reed, Founder, Head Prospector www.goldstrikers.com 1-408-942-0138 kreed@goldstrikers.com |Featured Recruiter|
  44. 44. 45 Southeast TAX Connection Placing Corporate Tax Professionals Greater Atlanta Area, GA Southeast TAX Connection is a professional search firm that specializes exclusively in recruit- ing and placing tax professionals at corporate tax departments and accounting firms throughout the Southeast region. From our headquarters in Atlanta, we serve clients in Georgia, Tennessee, Virginia, the Carolinas, Florida, Alabama, Louisiana and Arkansas. Our dedicated search consultants source, screen and deliver “Best in Class” tax talent cov- ering all skill sets, including: federal and state income tax compliance, tax accounting and provision, international tax and transfer pricing, tax planning and research, mergers and ac- quisitions, audit and controversy, sales and use tax, property tax, and tax technology. We serve tax professionals at all career levels, from seniors and managers to directors and vice- presidents. We Specialize In The Following: Industries  All Function  Tax Professionals General Service Area  North America, GA Carlton Eaton, Vice President www.southeasttaxconnection.com 1-678-557-2709 carlton@southeasttaxconnection.com |Featured Recruiter|
  45. 45. 46 DEVON Wright Direct Hire and Temporary Staffing New York, NY DAVON Wright is a full-service, nationwide staffing agency that offers flexible staffing op- tions. When you have identified a position that is critical to your organizational growth, the time to fill that position needs to be managed closely. Many businesses are utilizing the ser- vices of nationwide staffing agencies to gain access to talent and adjust their workforce based on the ever changing needs of their business. DAVON Wright Recruiting & Staffing Solutions offers temporary, temp-to-hire and direct placement options which gives you the access to quickly increase or decrease your workforce as needed. We Specialize In The Following: Industries  All Function  Executive, Legal, Finance, Industrial, Warehouse, Manufacturing General Service Area  North America, NY William Gray, Director of Talent Acquisition http://www.davonwright.com 1-888-494-2795 william@davonwright.com |Featured Recruiter|
  46. 46. 47 Allah Smith Recruiter Houston, TX Brenda Rose Executive Recruiter Danville, CA Carlton Eaton VP Marietta, GA Danielle Peters Recruiter Valencia, CA Danita Streight Recruiter Sugar Land, TX Dean Teschner Executive Recruiter Atlanta, GA Deirdre Prete Recruiter New York, NY Dora Cerrillos Partner Chatsworth, CA Emily Davey Recruiter Akron, OH Iris Smith Senior Recruiter Marietta, GA Jon Mahoney Recruitment Manag- er, Perm Accounting and Finance Boston, MA Julie Trinh Accounting San Jose, CA Kevin Hampton Executive Search Consultant Houston, TX Kimberly Grant Sr. Recruiter Selbyville, DE Larry Revier Senior Recruiting Manager Golden Valley, MN Lisa Haynes Staffing Manager Denver, CO Lisa Martin Recruiter Phoenix, AZ Mark Roman Executive Recruiter Edison, NJ Monty Tolbert Sr. Managing Partner Pomona, NJ Sara Strickler Senior Executive Re- cruiter Parsippany, NJ Shawn Mahoney assistant vice presi- dent new York, NY Shirley Hou Recruiter Dalian, Outside U.S. Stacey Clark Branch Manager Westlake Village, CA Tamara Burks Sourcing Manager Tampa, FL Tim Bramley recruiting director Redondo beach, CA Tracy Bell National Recruiter Plano, TX Darren Bagnall Recruiter San Francisco, CA Denise Marshall Sales Manager La Palma, CO Eric Meine Senior Recruiter San Diego, CA Jamie Lee HR Director San Francisco, CA Jennifer Rosky Senior Executive Re- cruiter Los Angeles, CA Kara Folsom Senior Recruiter/ Account Manager Cranston, RI Larry Schofield Recruiter Idaho Falls, ID Larry Spivey Managing Director Charlotte, NC Martin Igbinogun Technical manage- ment Oakland, CA Roni Zapin Analytics Recruiter New York, NY Rosenda Teta Recruiter Los Angeles, CA Traci Hughes Founder, President Austin, TX Anita Singh Recruitment Specialist Bothel, WA Annette Wise Sr. Recruiter Little Rock, AR Brett Harwood CEO Portland, OR Chip Cameron Global Technology Specialist Orlando, FL Diana Ratsavong Recruiter Philadelphia, PA Eric Edwards Founding Partner Vail, AZ Ian Weinstock Recruiter Arlington, VA James Harris Director of Recruiting Jonesboro, LA Jerry Frank VP Scientific Search New York, NY Joseph Repetto Technical Recruiter Beverly, MA Kitty Alvarez Global Vice President Recruiter Tampa, FL Michael Birdsell Director of Opera- tions San Francisco, CA Nancy Murphy Senior Technical Re- cruiter Littleton, CO Ray Young Sr. Intel Recruiter Lanham, MD Steve frank Recruiter Hartford, CT Terri Clayton President Norfolk, VA Tracy Richards Executive Recruiter (Principal) Cameron Park, CA Lynn Guo Recruiting Manager Beijing, Outside U.S. Swisher Leslie President Miami, FL Andrew Schloss Recruiter Sterling Heights, MI April Dollinger Recruiter Warren, MI Jason Liu HR Recruiter shanghai, Outside U.S. Johnny Wu Recruiting Consultant Shanghai, Outside U.S. Linda Liu Headhunter Ningbo, Outside U.S. Rita Smieska Technical Recruiter Clinton Township, MI Shannon Smith Direct Placement Recruiter Bloomfield Hills, MI Steven Xin Global Staffing Man- ager Fujian, Outside U.S. Wenchao Dong Recruiter Livonia, MI To view details of the individuals listed in this directory or to send them a message, please visit www.enetrecruiter.com. Accounting / Tax Advertising and Marketing Aerospace and Defense Architecture Automotive Aviation / Aerospace
  47. 47. 48 Alex Knox Sr. Technical Recruiter Calabasas- ere, CA Andrea Carden Sr. Recruiter Huntsville, AL Elizabeth Nelson Managing Director Dallas, TX Laura Comiskey Contract Recruiter Sherwood, OR Lisa Retchless Technical Recruiter Redmond, WA David Huch Senior Recruiter Irving, TX Dyanna Gonzaga Vice President, Talent Acquisition and Staffing San Francisco, CA Germaine Robinson Recruiter Queen creek, AZ Jon Reisinger Account Executive Spokane, WA Kyle Jude IT Recruiter Plano, TX Peg English Director of Recruiting Seattle, WA DAVID CLAY Sr. Staffing Consultant Livermore, CA Ed Giorgi Executive Recruiter, Clinical Research Rockville, MD Jim Schlaffer Technical Recruiter Simi Valley, CA Marina Mann Principal Oak Park, CA Venkatesh Bolappa Technical Recruiter San Francisco, CA Vinnie Warren Sr. Technical Recruiter San Jose, CA Anthony Galio Recruiter Clayton, NC April Miller Technical Recruiter Irvine, CA Kinh DeMaree Recruiting Specialist Mountain View, CA Pamela Dixon Staffing Advisor/ Recruiter Sacramento, CA Regina Farr Recruiter Gastonia, NC Sam Lewis Mgr. Recruitment Milwaukee, WI Sharon Spurrier Recruiter San Jose, CA Shibu Cherian Senior Technical Re- cruiter/Consultant Lilburn, GA Stepnanie Lewis Managing Director Atlanta, GA Tommy Winston CEO Wellington, CO Brian Ply Associate-Senior Re- cruiting Manager Alexandria, VA Doug Gray Principal Warrenton, VA Jimmy Matthews Recruiter King of Prussia, PA Lee Knight Vice President Jacksonville, FL Maritess Hochderffer Recruiter San Francisco, CA Nanda Fowler Perm Placement Con- sultant-Engineering Milwaukee, WI Urszula Roman Recruiter Kirkland, WA Audra Montgomery Sales Recruiter Pleasanton, CA Brian Barrera Talent Acquisition Man- ager Carrollton, TX Diane Benveniste Recruiting Consultant - Sales & Marketing and IT Operations Sammamish, WA Jane Crisler Recruiter San Antonio, TX Julie Fanelli Recruitment Manager Brooklyn, NY Leah Quist Account Manager / Recruiter San Jose, CA Lee Ballen Director London, Outside U.S. Pamela Claughton Principal/Senior Recruit- er Plymouth, MA Saide Nikkar Senior Recruiter/ Recruitment Mgr Los Angeles, CA Todd Culotta IT Recruiter Virginia Beach, VA Wendy Hart President, Partner Con- sultant Lake Stevens, WA Beverly Auton Recruiter Mountain View, CA Jiajia Du Headhunter Beijing, Outside U.S. Mark W. Stein Partner Mclean, VA Glynda Finister President Dayton, OH Jill Hernstat CEO San Francisco, CA Kim Hagee Executive Recruiter Pembroke Pines, FL Leah Cummings VP of Recruiting Palm Beach, FL Tera Edmunds Recruiting Manager Coralville, IA Vicki Lauter Principal Atlanta, GA Aaron Lintz Recruiter Margate, FL Anjay Bajaj Director Irvine, CA Arthur Jones Partner Yorba Linda, CA Bernard Burney Recruiter Rolesville, NC Bob Martin Recruiting Strategist Newark, DE Calvert Zhu Headhunter Shanghai, Outside U.S. Colleen Jones COO Foothill Ranch, CA Dave Brar Manager Elk Grove, CA Dave Love Sr. Technical Recruiting Consultant Centerville, OH Deborah Vazquez CEO Ft. Lauderdale, FL Elaina Frizzell Co-Founder/President & Recruiter Banking Biotechnology Call Center Civil Engineering To view details of the individuals listed in this directory or to send them a message, please visit www.enetrecruiter.com. Cloud Computing Commercial Real Estate Communications Computer Games
  48. 48. 49 Elaina Frizzell Co-Founder/President & Recruiter Oak Ridge, TN Eric Hoagberg Managing Partner Raleigh, NC Fred Threatt Technical Recruiter San Martin, CA Jay Adhiya Sr. HR/Recruiter Boston, MA Jemel Buck Managing Director Sterling, VA Jim Trainor Partner Pewaukee, WI Ju Shim Sr. Talent Acquisition Manager New York, NY LaTasha Siler Senior Recruiter Greensboro, NC Lisa Osborne Recruiting Specialist Havertown, PA Liu Suki HR Guangzhou, Outside U.S. Manish Iyer Business Manager Mt. Laurel, NJ Marc Rodriguez Recruiting Manager Santa Ana, CA Maya Russo Senior IT Recruiter Atlanta, GA Melissa Holmes Senior Technical Re- cruiter Overland Park, KS Mini Dhingra Partner Tarrytown, NY Nazo Haroutunian Senior Associate New York, NY Nik Gutscher Sr. IT Recruiter Overland, KS Nishi Karla Manager Chicago, IL Philip Isom Principal Albany, NY Rebecca Lee COO Beijing, Outside U.S. Rob Cantu Consultant San Antonio, TX Roni J Owner Atlanta, GA Sam Laconia Sr. IT Recruiter Alpharetta, GA Sanket Deshpande Recruiter Ann Arbor, MI Sarang Matkari Director - Recruitment Parsippany, NJ Sean Taplin Director London, Outside U.S. Stephanie Quinones Talent Acquisition Man- ager Orlando, FL Steve Biondi Senior recruiter Pacifica, CA Steve Goloskov Sr. Technical Recruiter Baltimore, MD Tony Hotko President Lombard, IL Uma Varadarajan Resource Manager Santa Clara, CA Ward Wilson Sr. Technical Recruiter Salt Lake City, UT Carl Kenny Senior Technical Recruiter Santa Clara, CA Cathy Wu HR Coordinator San Jose, CA Jennifer King Recruiter Englewood, CO Luong Phu Corporate Recruiter Fremont, CA Marjean Bean Owner Little Rock, AR Matt Nelson Contract Technical Recruiter San Francisco, CA Matt Pettis Engineering Recruiter Raleigh, NC Melissa Horton Staffing Consultant Mountain View, CA Phoenix Bu Market Recruiter in Chi- na Beijing, Outside U.S. Richard Sun Recruiter Shanghai, MI Beau Gould Senior Recruiter/ CEO Virtual, CA Karen Adkins Technical Recruiter Leasburg, NC Kristina May Owner San Francisco, CA Phillip Parker-Walker Technical Recruiter Gaithersburg, MD Rob Allen Recruiter Denver, CO Shea Lewis Recruiter Pleasanton, CA Stephen Blank Recruiter Chicago, IL Tami Heyden Recruiter Scottsdale, AZ TD Sykes Regional Recruiter Little Rock, AR Tracy Lightsey Executive Recruiter Atlanta, GA Tracy Peterson Training Evangelist Campbell, CA Abhijeet Srivastava Talent Acquisition Mount Laurel, NJ Amanda Arias Corporate Recruiter Los Angeles, CA Ashley Hernandez Recruiting and Sales Manager Naperville, IL Barbara Marks Corporate Recruiter Atlanta, GA Cheryl Elliott HR Director Sunnyvale, CA Chris Ahsing Sourcer Martinez, CA Chris de los Reyes Sr Employment Coordi- nator Mountain View, CA Chris Schellenberg Recruiter San Diego, CA Cyril Moreau IT Recruiter San Francisco, CA Dan McLaughlin Principal Torrance, CA Dana Pefferly Sourcer Mesa, AZ Daniel Miller Healthcare IT Recruiter Solon, OH Daniel Parrillo President - Sr. Tech Re- cruiter/Staffing Man- ager/Software Engi- neer San Francisco, CA David Sadler Talent Acquisition Spe- cialist Estero, FL Deepa Saluja Sr. Technical Recruiter Fremont, CA Diane Wales recruiter San Francisco, CA To view details of the individuals listed in this directory or to send them a message, please visit www.enetrecruiter.com. Computer Hardware Computer Networking Computer Software
  49. 49. 50 Dominika Skladowska Recruiter BIOT, Outside U.S. Donna Rutledge Sr. Technical Talent Partner San Mateo, CA Dorothy Dodenhoff Sr. Manager - Recruit- ment Charlotte, NC Doug Cohen President & Founder Medfield, MA Ed Gentile Recruiting Manager Brighton, MI Ed Thorpe Sales/Engineering Re- cruiter Santa Cruz, CA Frances Gomillion Technical Recruiter Mclean, VA Helen Leong Consultant San Francisco, CA Herb Deitz President San Carlos, CA Hether Brice Senior Candidate De- velopment Recruiter Austin, TX Irfan Anjum Technical Recruiter New York, NY Jagdeep Kathuria Partner Sterling, VA Jeff Beavers Chief Marketing Officer Chicago, IL Jeff Wiehardt Director, Talent Acquisition Maryland Heights, MO Jim Henry Sr Recruiter Seattle, WA Julian Gonzalez Human Capital Lead Baldwin, NY Kate Rhoades Recruiter Cary, NC KayLee Haw Senior Recruiter San Mateo, CA Kelli Upton Recruiting Manager Ravensdale, WA Keren Douek Director of Recruitment St. Louis, MO Kyle Herman Owner Beaver Dam, WI Leslie Dutton Recruiter Palo Alto, CA Lisa Bays Senior Technical, Engi- neering, & Operations Recruiter Bellingham, WA Luan Lam Head - Global Talent Acquisition San Francisco, CA Maggie Wang Senior Staffing Consult- ant Beijing, Outside U.S. Maria Tselevich technical recruiter Foxboro, MA Mark McCumber Manager Charlotte, NC Martin Prashanth Lead IT Recruiter Princeton, NJ Mary McHenry Technical Recruiter Tracy, CA Matt Brown Talent Acquisition Man- ager Chicago, IL Matthew Liptak Manager, Talent Acqui- sition Burlington, MA Michael Crouch Recruiter Santa Clara, CA Michael James Recruiter Alexandria, VA Michael Lucier Senior Staffing Consult- ant Salem, NH Michelle You Technical & Executive Recruiter Walnut Creek, CA Mike Dodds Client Services Manager Pittsburgh, PA Milann Ruddy Technical Recruiter Santa Clara, CA Natalie Fu Recruiter Shanghai, Outside U.S. Nicole Tembrevilla Engineering Recruiter Santa Clara, CA Paige Blankenship Recruiting Team Lead Dacula, GA Patrick Scott Senior IT Recruiter the colony, TX Priti Beri Recruiter Mountain View, CA Raff Gan Director Singapore, Outside U.S. Rajalakshmi Jambulin- gam Talent Acquisition Man- ager Edison, NJ Rajesh Naidu Resource Manager Santa Clara, CA Ravikumar Dabburi Recruiter Powell, OH Rob Caulfield Director Durham, NC Ronald Shields Co-Founder Oxnard, CA Rose Mauriello President Woburn, MA Ryan Harding Recruiter Glendale, AZ Sally QIN Principal Recruiter Beijing, Outside U.S. Sanjay Pallikonda SR. IT Recruiter Houston, TX Sarah Qi Sr. Recruiter Beijing, Outside U.S. Scott Spears Lead Recruiter San Ramon, CA Shannon Gakenheimer Corporate Recruiter Raleigh, NC Shashi Kushwaha Recruiter Fremont, CA Sheri Shaw Director of Company Owned Professional Search Indianapolis, IN Shreya Chopra Sr. Recruiter San Francisco, CA Sophie Thomas Sr. Technical Recruiter Chicago, IL sreekesh Thampy Technical Recruiter Santa clara, CA Steve Navarro Sourcer San Jose, CA Sunny Zhong Senior Recruiter Shanghai, Outside U.S. Susanne McEvoy Staffing Consultant Stamford, CA Sylvia Hilmy Recruiter Sunnyvale, CA Tiffany Nguyen Talent Acquisition Man- ager San Carlos, CA Vinesa Blackwell Senior Technical Re- cruiter Sausalito, CA Vinothini Arunachalam HR Assistant / Recruiter San Jose, CA Will Murphy HR Manager Chicago, IL Yuvaraj Dhanasekar Talent Acquisition Natick, MA Alex Minero National Skilled Trade Recruiter Glendale, CA To view details of the individuals listed in this directory or to send them a message, please visit www.enetrecruiter.com. Construction / Building

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