Nano-enabled Manufacturing : Transitioning from Science to Products Mano Manoharan General Manager GE Global Research Bang...
Global trends … <ul><li>…  create big challenges </li></ul>Population Consumption Energy Security Environment
It’s a material world Stone age Iron age Bronze age Silicon age Courtesy : US Geological Survey <ul><li>Challenges </li></...
This is GE   <ul><li>Operations in over    100+  countries </li></ul><ul><li>300,000+  employees   worldwide </li></ul><ul...
History of innovation 1909 Ductile tungsten 1913 Medical X-ray 1927 First television broadcast reception 1932 Langmuir Nob...
GE Global Research <ul><li>First US industrial lab </li></ul><ul><li>Began 1900 in Schenectady, NY </li></ul><ul><li>Found...
3,000 technologists strong Global Research Center Niskayuna, NY John F. Welch Technology Center Bangalore, India China Tec...
John F Welch Technology center People Infrastructure <ul><li>4300 +   Technologists  </li></ul><ul><li>Over 60% with advan...
From concept to product Stage Effort Concept    Product In the end its all about business impact Academic Research Industr...
<ul><li>Started:  2002  </li></ul><ul><li>Vision: </li></ul><ul><li>High risk, big impact programs </li></ul><ul><li>Cross...
The Nanotechnology Platforms at GE NanoTubes and NanoRods Thermoelectrics, PV NanoParticles NanoEngineered Surfaces NanoCe...
Nanotechnology for GE…  The Ultimate Material Science Current Material Limits Today Evolutionary Progress of Technology Na...
The Lotus effect Hydrophobic material + Appropriate Texture Superydrophilic Hydrophilic material + Appropriate Texture Con...
<ul><li>Superhydrophobicity for GE </li></ul><ul><li>Today: teflon, silicones, polymers… </li></ul><ul><li>GE need:  Metal...
Droplet Impact Applications 1mm-radius droplet impacting at 3m/s All three textures are superhydrophobic,  but exhibit vas...
Nanomanufacturing  A paradigm shift needed to realize the benefits of nano
It has happened before Materials Intermediates Products Silicon Transistor Radios Source: Lux Research It can now happen i...
Nanomanufacturing scorecard <ul><li>Does a value chain exist for the product ? </li></ul><ul><li>How much of the value cha...
Nanomanufacturing and sustainability <ul><li>Nature has done distributed and sustainable nanomanufacturing for a while ! <...
Nanotechnology @ GE <ul><li>The Ultimate Materials Science </li></ul><ul><li>Sweet spot for GE </li></ul><ul><li>Balance b...
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Mano Manoharan GE - Nano-enabled Manufacturing

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Dr Manu Manohar GE future of Material science

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  • GE is the only company included on the original Dow Jones Industrial Index in 1896 that is still listed today…a testament in large part to our history of innovation. From lighting and health care to aviation and energy, we have a long, proud history of churning out new inventions and breakthroughs that have transformed how people live.
  • GE is known for many things: world-changing innovation, global scope, unyielding integrity, financial stability and reliable growth, among others. But most of all, we’re known for hiring exceptional people and giving them unparalleled opportunities to build their careers and capabilities. There is simply no other company in the world with such a diverse a set of businesses in which to work, and such a development-focused culture in which to grow.
  • GE has a rich history of innovation, starting with Edison’s ductile tungsten filaments for the first practical lightbulb Most of these innovations were Imagination Breakthroughs in their day Many, such as the lightbulb, medical x-ray, jet engines, Lexan, have grown into multi-billion dollar businesses And some, like MRI, have taken existing technology and incorporated new technology push the limits of performance and capabilities to even greater heights. GRC developed enabling technology that led to the introduction of the first clinically viable high field MRI scanner. GRC also has had two Nobel Prize winners: Langmuir and Giaever
  • It started in a barn. In 1900, the General Electric Company was only eight years old. The hottest technology of the day was electricity. GE’s chief consulting engineer, Charles Proteus Steinmetz, a reknowned industrial scientist of his time and a contemporary of Thomas Edison, convinced the GE leadership that if the company were to maintain its edge in lighting and electricity, and find new areas to grow, they would need a research laboratory. Charles Coffin, GE&apos;s first CEO, agreed and the first industrial research lab in the US was born in the carriage barn in Steinmetz&apos;s backyard. Steinmetz then persuaded Willis Whitney, a young chemistry professor from MIT who had been conducting experiments for GE, to become the first director of the GE Research Laboratory. Elihu Thomson, a founder of the company, summed up the mission of the lab: “It does seem to me therefore that a Company as large as the General Electric Company, should not fail to continue investing and developing in new fields: there should, in fact, be a research laboratory for commercial applications of new principles, and even for the discovery of those principles. One of the earliest projects of the new lab was to defend the company&apos;s primary asset – incandescent lighting – through innovation. In 1908, GE scientist William Coolidge invented the ductile tungsten filament that made the GE incandescent lamp significantly more durable than the original design. It was an invention that secured GE&apos;s technological leadership in the market and epitomizes the role of the GE research lab – bringing innovation to the marketplace. The Research Lab has expanded considerably since then, but our mission remains the same – bringing great technology to the marketplace.
  • Global Research is truly a global enterprise. We have four global sites and a fifth under development in Qatar; global teams working on global technologies. Having a global presence like this enables us to access the best and brightest talent from all over the world. It also enables us to have a keen understanding of the technology needs and drivers in the key markets where GE is doing business. It’s about bringing technology closer to our businesses and to the regions of the world where we are competing.
  • If you look at the examples in the previous slide…they were across different GE businesses… All of those we made possible by engineers here. The reason why we are successful….mini GE…almost all disciplines…This is a great way to share knowledge, domain expertise across different businesses and product lines We are however based on a center of excellence model…ensuring minimal duplication of skills…might have small overlaps
  • So what high risk, big impact programs should we explore. Consider the tech diversity of GE, that’s not a trivial question. So first question – where’s the money now? Where is Jeff Immelt– pretty good guy- investing his money.
  • sampling
  • Opportunity we see is huge How do we achieve? Value chain
  • Mano Manoharan GE - Nano-enabled Manufacturing

    1. 1. Nano-enabled Manufacturing : Transitioning from Science to Products Mano Manoharan General Manager GE Global Research Bangalore PPT shrinker v 11.0.0.8313 - FJ
    2. 2. Global trends … <ul><li>… create big challenges </li></ul>Population Consumption Energy Security Environment
    3. 3. It’s a material world Stone age Iron age Bronze age Silicon age Courtesy : US Geological Survey <ul><li>Challenges </li></ul><ul><li>Resource constraint </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainable development </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Recycle, reuse, optimize </li></ul><ul><li>New generation of materials </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tailor-made </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Multi-functional </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Synthesized bottoms up </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. This is GE <ul><li>Operations in over 100+ countries </li></ul><ul><li>300,000+ employees worldwide </li></ul><ul><li>$157+ billion in revenue in ’09 </li></ul><ul><li>Manufacturing facilities in 30+ countries </li></ul><ul><li>Broad Portfolio </li></ul>Media GE Capital Energy Infrastructure NBC Universal Technology Infrastructure Consumer & Industrial
    5. 5. History of innovation 1909 Ductile tungsten 1913 Medical X-ray 1927 First television broadcast reception 1932 Langmuir Nobel Prize in chemistry 1938 Invisible/glareless glass 1942 First US jet engine 1953 LEXAN TM polycarbonate 1955 Man-made diamonds 1962 Semi-conductor laser 1973 Giaever Nobel Prize in physics 1984 Magnetic resonance imaging 1994 GE90 ® composite fan blade 1999 Digital X-ray 2004 Lightspeed VCT
    6. 6. GE Global Research <ul><li>First US industrial lab </li></ul><ul><li>Began 1900 in Schenectady, NY </li></ul><ul><li>Founding principle … improve businesses through technology </li></ul><ul><li>One of the world’s most diverse industrial labs </li></ul>Market focused R&D
    7. 7. 3,000 technologists strong Global Research Center Niskayuna, NY John F. Welch Technology Center Bangalore, India China Technology Center Shanghai, China Global Research – Europe Munich, Germany
    8. 8. John F Welch Technology center People Infrastructure <ul><li>4300 + Technologists </li></ul><ul><li>Over 60% with advanced degrees </li></ul><ul><li>10% Global Experience </li></ul><ul><li>Over 950 Patents filed </li></ul><ul><ul><li>US$175 Million Investment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>50 acres: 1.153M sq ft of Labs & offices </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>24 x 7 captive power </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Zero emission </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. From concept to product Stage Effort Concept Product In the end its all about business impact Academic Research Industrial R & D Industrial production Lots of Nano Some Nano Limited Nano Establish scientific principles or technical concept Demonstrate technical concept Identify market opportunity Demonstrate value proposition Initial application toll gates identified Major technical risks retired Validate market opportunity
    10. 10. <ul><li>Started: 2002 </li></ul><ul><li>Vision: </li></ul><ul><li>High risk, big impact programs </li></ul><ul><li>Cross-business </li></ul><ul><li>Multi-disciplinary team of scientists (>70 in 2008) </li></ul><ul><li>Leverage GE/GRC technology depth and breadth </li></ul><ul><li>Fill the pipeline </li></ul><ul><li>“ Incubator” mindset </li></ul><ul><li>Nano focal point for </li></ul><ul><li>GE businesses </li></ul>Nanotechnology AT 2008 2002
    11. 11. The Nanotechnology Platforms at GE NanoTubes and NanoRods Thermoelectrics, PV NanoParticles NanoEngineered Surfaces NanoCeramics Membranes & Sensors Next Generation Coatings Nanostructured Metals Engineering Nickel Alloys Wear and abrasion coatings
    12. 12. Nanotechnology for GE… The Ultimate Material Science Current Material Limits Today Evolutionary Progress of Technology Nano Is the Enabling Technology for Materials Science As Integrated Circuits Were for Digital Electronics. Potential of Nano Materials NanoTechnology will Create a Step Change New Products, New Markets, Major Improvements Nano Healthcare Aviation Higher Thrust to Weight Ratio Engines Faster, more accurate diagnosis Cleaner, more efficient turbine technology Energy
    13. 13. The Lotus effect Hydrophobic material + Appropriate Texture Superydrophilic Hydrophilic material + Appropriate Texture Contact Angle < 20 0 < 70 0 > 90 0 > 150 0 Hydrophilic Hydrophobic Superydrophobic
    14. 14. <ul><li>Superhydrophobicity for GE </li></ul><ul><li>Today: teflon, silicones, polymers… </li></ul><ul><li>GE need: Metal systems for harsh environments </li></ul><ul><li>Technical Focus </li></ul><ul><li>Superhydrophobic metals & ceramics </li></ul><ul><li>Structure-property relationships </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Quick screen entitlement  priorities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Technical Risks </li></ul><ul><li>Robustness </li></ul><ul><li>Manufacturability @ Cost </li></ul>Model Textures Realistic Textures NanoEngineered Surfaces Platform
    15. 15. Droplet Impact Applications 1mm-radius droplet impacting at 3m/s All three textures are superhydrophobic, but exhibit vastly different but predictable response to droplet impact Superhydrophobic Textures:
    16. 16. Nanomanufacturing A paradigm shift needed to realize the benefits of nano
    17. 17. It has happened before Materials Intermediates Products Silicon Transistor Radios Source: Lux Research It can now happen in nanotechnology Silicon Microprocessor Computers Internet The digital age 1950s 1980s
    18. 18. Nanomanufacturing scorecard <ul><li>Does a value chain exist for the product ? </li></ul><ul><li>How much of the value chain needs to be modified to incorporate nanomaterials? </li></ul><ul><li>Can existing processes be modified or do entirely new processes need to be created? </li></ul><ul><li>Is there a compelling value proposition? </li></ul><ul><li>Can the infrastructure needed be shared across multiple product lines? Companies? Nations? </li></ul>Transitioning from technology push to market pull
    19. 19. Nanomanufacturing and sustainability <ul><li>Nature has done distributed and sustainable nanomanufacturing for a while ! </li></ul><ul><li>Complex, often multi-functional materials are synthesized with minimal waste, high yield, are all recycled and often use the minimum needed energy for their production. </li></ul><ul><li>Need to design nanomanufacturing process with sustainability in mind </li></ul>Nanomanufactuirng a potential path to sustainability
    20. 20. Nanotechnology @ GE <ul><li>The Ultimate Materials Science </li></ul><ul><li>Sweet spot for GE </li></ul><ul><li>Balance between research and applications </li></ul><ul><li>Lab to manufacturing … huge challenge </li></ul>

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