Separation of Powers<br />Review<br />
Federalist #51<br />	“Ambition must be made to counteract ambition.  The interest of the man must be connected with the co...
Separation of Powers<br />The division of powers among several institutions that must cooperate in decision or policy-maki...
Distribution of Power<br />Founders assumed that the Legislative Branch is most powerful.<br /><ul><li>Article I– the most...
The other branches depend on Congress for much of their authority.</li></ul>Today– many think of the Executive Branch has ...
Increasing powers of the president
Increasing legislative influence of the White House.</li></li></ul><li>Checks and Balances<br />“…by so contriving the int...
Fig. 2.2<br />
FEDERALISM<br />
Types of power arrangements<br />Unitary governments<br />Confederation governments<br />Federal governments<br />
Federalism and the American Founding<br />	The balance of power between the central government and the states was at the h...
Federalism and the American Founding<br />	Although the Federalists won the struggle over ratification, the federal balanc...
Federalism and the American Founding<br />	“[If] the people should in the future become more partial to the federal than t...
National Government Powers<br />Expressed powers<br />collect taxes<br />coin money <br />declare war<br />Implied powers<...
	10th Amendment<br />	“The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the Stat...
Stages of Federalism<br />There have  been FOUR STAGES OF FEDERALISM throughout American history.<br />1789               ...
Stages of Federalism<br />There have  been FOUR STAGES OF FEDERALISM throughout American history.<br />1789               ...
Fig. 3.2 top<br />
Stages of Federalism<br />There have  been FOUR STAGES OF FEDERALISM throughout American history.<br />1789               ...
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Chapt 3

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  • Bobby Knight…. When his team is playing in Puerto Rico, he hit a ref when blowing up about a call… P.R. asks for extradition– but Indiana refuses.
  • Chapt 3

    1. 1. Separation of Powers<br />Review<br />
    2. 2. Federalist #51<br /> “Ambition must be made to counteract ambition. The interest of the man must be connected with the constitutional rights of the place. It may be a reflection on human nature that such devices should be necessary to control the abuses of government. But what is government itself but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary.”<br />--James Madison (Publius), Federalist #51<br />
    3. 3. Separation of Powers<br />The division of powers among several institutions that must cooperate in decision or policy-making<br />The allocation of constitutional authority to each of the three branches of government<br />With different responsibilities<br />Different powers<br />Different constituencies, which makes them accountable to different groups of people<br />Different terms of service<br />
    4. 4. Distribution of Power<br />Founders assumed that the Legislative Branch is most powerful.<br /><ul><li>Article I– the most detailed in outlining power and restrictions
    5. 5. The other branches depend on Congress for much of their authority.</li></ul>Today– many think of the Executive Branch has having the most power.<br /><ul><li>Growth of the bureaucracy
    6. 6. Increasing powers of the president
    7. 7. Increasing legislative influence of the White House.</li></li></ul><li>Checks and Balances<br />“…by so contriving the interior structure of the government as that its several constituent parts may, by their mutual relations, be the means of keeping each other in their proper place.”<br />“Ambition must be made to counteract ambition.”<br />Each has in interest in making sure others do not gain more power than their fair share.<br />
    8. 8. Fig. 2.2<br />
    9. 9. FEDERALISM<br />
    10. 10. Types of power arrangements<br />Unitary governments<br />Confederation governments<br />Federal governments<br />
    11. 11. Federalism and the American Founding<br /> The balance of power between the central government and the states was at the heart of the constitutional struggle between the Federalists and the Antifederalists.<br />
    12. 12. Federalism and the American Founding<br /> Although the Federalists won the struggle over ratification, the federal balance of power remained contested and paradoxical throughout American history and was at the heart of struggles throughout American history such as:<br /> 1. the ability of states to “nullify” federal laws;<br /> 2. the Civil War;<br /> 3. the power of the central government in the New Deal;<br /> 4. the “rights” of states vs. the rights of citizens in the Civil Rights Movement.<br />
    13. 13. Federalism and the American Founding<br /> “[If] the people should in the future become more partial to the federal than to the State governments … the people ought not surely to be precluded from giving most of their confidence where they may discover it to be most due.”<br />--James Madison (Publius)<br />Federalist #46<br />
    14. 14. National Government Powers<br />Expressed powers<br />collect taxes<br />coin money <br />declare war<br />Implied powers<br />The “necessary and proper” powers the national government from their implication in the Constitution<br />State Government Powers<br />Reserved powers<br />“police powers” (the powers to regulate the health, safety, and morals of its citizens)<br />10th Amendment<br />
    15. 15. 10th Amendment<br /> “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.”<br />
    16. 16. Stages of Federalism<br />There have been FOUR STAGES OF FEDERALISM throughout American history.<br />1789 1937 1960 1970 1990<br />“DUAL FEDERALISM”<br />
    17. 17. Stages of Federalism<br />There have been FOUR STAGES OF FEDERALISM throughout American history.<br />1789 1937 1960 1970 1990<br />“DUAL II. “COOPERATIVE FEDERALISM” FEDERALISM”<br />
    18. 18. Fig. 3.2 top<br />
    19. 19. Stages of Federalism<br />There have been FOUR STAGES OF FEDERALISM throughout American history.<br />1789 1937 1960 1970 1990<br />I. “DUAL II. “COOPERATIVE III. “REGULATED<br /> FEDERALISM” FEDERALISM” FEDERALISM<br />
    20. 20.
    21. 21. Stages of Federalism<br />There have been FOUR STAGES OF FEDERALISM throughout American history.<br />1789 1937 1960 1970 1990<br />I. “DUAL II. “COOPERATIVE III. “REGULATED IV. “NEW<br /> FEDERALISM” FEDERALISM” FEDERALISM FEDERALISM”<br />
    22. 22. State to State Relationships<br />Full Faith and Credit<br />Privileges and Immunities<br />Extradition<br />

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