Health 2.0 – The Next Wave

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Health 2.0 – The Next Wave

  1. 1. Change and Reform in the American Health Care System Kent Bottles, MD ICSI [email_address]
  2. 2. ICSI Online <ul><li>www.icsi.org </li></ul><ul><li>http://icsihealthcareblog.wordpress.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>ICSI on Facebook </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ICSIorg </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Kentbotttles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Norskedoc </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Dr. Alan Greene’s Healthcare Bubble <ul><li>Trade at high volumes </li></ul><ul><li>Prices at variance with intrinsic values </li></ul><ul><li>Market prices are unsustainably high </li></ul><ul><li>Misallocation of resources into non-optimal uses </li></ul><ul><li>Destined to come to an end </li></ul>
  4. 4. Adam Bosworth of Keas <ul><li>“When the consumers all leave, sooner or later the laggards have to follow or die” </li></ul>
  5. 5. Health 2.0 <ul><li>“ Community is the killer app in health care” Steve Case, Revolution Health </li></ul><ul><li>Web 1.0 users search for and read information </li></ul><ul><li>Web 2.0 regular people create content on line </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Photo-sharing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Video-uploading </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Music downloading </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Personal blogging </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Podcasts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tom O’Reilly 2005 </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Health 2.0 <ul><li>The use of social software and its ability to promote collaboration between patients, their caregivers, medical professionals, and other stakeholders in health </li></ul><ul><li>California study showed people with lowest levels of social contact had mortality rates 2 to 4 times greater than those with strong social networks </li></ul><ul><li>Supportive social networks improve outcomes in patients with heart failure, post-partum depression, preoperative pain, and anxiety </li></ul>
  7. 7. Flowering of Pro-Ams <ul><li>Committed, networked amateurs working to professional standards with new technology </li></ul><ul><li>Rap music </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul><ul><li>Podcasts </li></ul><ul><li>Linux </li></ul><ul><li>The Sims: 90% of content is from Pro-Ams </li></ul><ul><li>The Grameen Bank barefoot bankers $4 bil </li></ul><ul><li>Astronomy: Dobson, CCD, Internet </li></ul>
  8. 8. Nielsen Online: Time on Social Networks http://www.physorg.com/news163254287.html <ul><li>Number of minutes Americans spent on social networks grew 83% from 4/08 – 4/09 </li></ul><ul><li>Total minutes on Twitter </li></ul><ul><ul><li>7.9 million to 300 million </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Total minutes on Facebook </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1.7 billion to 13.9 billion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>700% increase </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Nielsen Online: Time on Social Networks http://www.physorg.com/news163254287.html <ul><li>Russian internet company invested $200 million in Facebook valued at $10 billion </li></ul><ul><li>Friendster and MySpace are declining </li></ul><ul><li>“ Consumers have shown that they are willing to pick up their networks and move them to another platform, seemingly at a moment’s notice,” Jon Gibs, Nielsen Online </li></ul>
  10. 10. The Social Life Of Health Information Pew Internet and American Life Project, June 2009 <ul><li>2000: 46% American adults had internet access, 5% households had broadband, & 25% Americans looked on line for health </li></ul><ul><li>2009: 74% go online, 57% have broadband, & 61% looked on line for health </li></ul>
  11. 11. The Social Life Of Health Information Pew Internet and American Life Project, June 2009 <ul><li>Where do you get information about health: </li></ul><ul><li>86% ask health professional, like doctor </li></ul><ul><li>68% ask a friend or family member </li></ul><ul><li>57% use the internet </li></ul><ul><li>54% use books </li></ul><ul><li>33% consult insurance provider </li></ul>
  12. 12. The Social Life Of Health Information Pew Internet and American Life Project, June 2009 <ul><li>“ Just in time someone like me” </li></ul><ul><li>41% of e-patients read someone else’s commentary on blog, website </li></ul><ul><li>24% of e-patients consult rankings of docs </li></ul><ul><li>24% of e-patients consult rankings of hosp. </li></ul><ul><li>19% of e-patients receive updates </li></ul><ul><li>13% of e-patients have listened to health podcast </li></ul>
  13. 13. The Social Life Of Health Information Pew Internet and American Life Project, June 2009 <ul><li>Creating new health content themselves </li></ul><ul><li>6% of e-patients have tagged online health content </li></ul><ul><li>6% of e-patients have posted comments in online group discussion </li></ul><ul><li>6% of e-patients have posted comment on blog </li></ul><ul><li>5% of e-patients have posted review of doc </li></ul><ul><li>4% of e-patients have shared photos, videos, or audio files about medical issues </li></ul>
  14. 14. Doctors and Twitter http://www.33charts.com/ <ul><li>Follow and listen </li></ul><ul><li>Goof around, think about how you want to use it. </li></ul><ul><li>Follow whoever you darn well please </li></ul><ul><li>Your patients and hospitals are listening </li></ul><ul><li>What happens on Twitter stays on Twitter </li></ul><ul><li>Exercise intelligent transparency </li></ul>
  15. 15. Twitter http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,1902604,00.html <ul><li>Clive Thompson’s ambient awareness </li></ul><ul><li>“Social warmth of stray details” </li></ul><ul><li>Twitting during a conference </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Public record of ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Continues dialogue well past end of conference </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wider audience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Second layer of discussion </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Twitter Tips for Health Executives http://www.nonclinicaljobs.com/ <ul><li>Follow back </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter has follow limit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Followers plus 10% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2000 followers can follow 2200 people </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Retweet, Interact, and Reply </li></ul><ul><li>Follow Friday: #FF, #followfriday </li></ul>
  17. 17. Online, ‘a Reason to Keep on Going’ Stephanie Clifford, NY Times, June 1, 2009 <ul><li>“I was dying of boredom. Eons, all by its lonesome, gave me a reason to keep on going.” Paula Rice, 73 </li></ul><ul><li>“One of the greatest challenges…we face as older adults…is actually about our social network deteriorating on us.” J. Coughlin </li></ul>
  18. 18. Online, ‘a Reason to Keep on Going’ Stephanie Clifford, NY Times, June 1, 2009 <ul><li>“ The new future of old age is about staying in society, staying the workplace and staying very connected. Technology is going to be a very big part of that, because the new reality is, increasingly, a virtual reality. It provides a way to make new connections, new friends and senses of purpose.” Joseph Coughlin, MIT AgeLab </li></ul>
  19. 19. Online, ‘a Reason to Keep on Going’ Stephanie Clifford, NY Times, June 1, 2009 <ul><li>MyWay Village in retirement homes </li></ul><ul><li>Eons (online community for Boomers) </li></ul><ul><li>Facebook, Twitter </li></ul><ul><li>One third of people 75 years old and older live alone </li></ul>
  20. 20. Cell Phones and Medicine http://ow.ly/cB41 <ul><li>“ When the iPhone launched, it was a $500 piece of crap. Now, with apps, it’s a minicomputer.” Ryan </li></ul><ul><li>Gravitytank </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Surveyed 804 smartphone users </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ethnographically studied 20 app-phones users </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interviewed 20 app developers </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. Cell Phones and Medicine http://ow.ly/cB41 <ul><li>Spend two hours per day on phone </li></ul><ul><li>Interact with phone 30 times a day </li></ul><ul><li>Average of 21 applications </li></ul><ul><li>How many apps do you use everyday </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1-2: 26% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3-4: 24% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>5-6: 21% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>6 +: 29% </li></ul></ul>
  22. 22. Cell Phones and Medicine http://ow.ly/cB41 <ul><li>Mobile productivity used to mean email and calendar access </li></ul><ul><li>Now applications for nutrition, exercise, finance, shopping, hobbies, access to media content </li></ul>
  23. 23. Cell Phones and Medicine http://ow.ly/cB41 <ul><li>25% of apps are paid </li></ul><ul><li>69% purchased an app in last month </li></ul><ul><li>Send about $6 a month for apps </li></ul><ul><li>“Paying is a no-brainer if you think it’s going to make your life better.” </li></ul>
  24. 24. Cell Phones and Medicine http://ow.ly/cB41 <ul><li>50% of app users: apps are essential tools to get more done and stay organized </li></ul><ul><li>Gender balanced and highly educated </li></ul><ul><li>Use computers, TVs, MP3 less and less </li></ul><ul><li>Time pressed </li></ul><ul><ul><li>78% never enough hours in day </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>77% always looking for ways to manage time </li></ul></ul>
  25. 25. Cell Phones and Medicine <ul><li>www.personalpediatrics.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>“A national network of dedicated physicians who are reinventing the lost art of pediatric house call medicine using wireless technology and state-of-the-art recordkeeping software.” </li></ul>
  26. 26. Cell Phones and Medicine http://mobilehealthnews.com/2401/interview-dr-hodge-the-first-iphone-doctor/ <ul><li>Natalie Hodge, MD (first iPhone Doctor) </li></ul><ul><li>3 years of experience in St. Louis </li></ul><ul><li>“ We intend to be an entirely mobile platform – there is no need for an office, at least for pediatricians.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Everything I need for my practice could fit in the trunk of my car.” </li></ul>
  27. 27. Cell Phones and Medicine http://mobilehealthnews.com/2401/interview-dr-hodge-the-first-iphone-doctor <ul><li>Hodge’s office had 5 employees </li></ul><ul><li>$200,000 a year in overhead </li></ul><ul><li>$50,000 a year in overhead for Personal Pediatrics new model of home visits </li></ul><ul><li>“Revenue is about the same” </li></ul>
  28. 28. Health 2.0 Tools <ul><li>Blogs </li></ul><ul><li>Online forums </li></ul><ul><li>Podcasts </li></ul><ul><li>Really Simple Syndication (RSS) </li></ul><ul><li>Social networks build online communities </li></ul><ul><li>Wikis enable community to record, edit, and verify knowledge on a particular disease </li></ul>
  29. 29. Health 2.0 Reasons Why Connect with Others <ul><li>See what others say about treatment 36% </li></ul><ul><li>To research others’ experiences 31% </li></ul><ul><li>To get education that helps me 27% </li></ul><ul><li>To get emotional support 17% </li></ul><ul><li>To build awareness around disease 15% </li></ul><ul><li>To share my knowledge with others 14% </li></ul><ul><li>To get recommendation about hospital 13% </li></ul><ul><li>To get recommendation about doctor 10% </li></ul><ul><li>To feel I belong to a group 8% </li></ul>
  30. 30. The State of the Blogosphere October 2008 <ul><li>Technorati indexes 133 million blogs </li></ul><ul><li>7.4 million blogs in last 120 days </li></ul><ul><li>1.5 million blogs in last 7 days </li></ul><ul><li>900,000 blog posts in last 24 hours </li></ul>
  31. 31. What is a blog? <ul><li>Weblog, Web log, blog </li></ul><ul><li>Online publication made up of postings </li></ul><ul><li>Credited with enormous influence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Resignation of Trent Lott </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resignation of Dan Rather as anchor of CBS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Harriet Miers nomination withdrawn </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jeff Jarvis blogged “Dell Sucks” </li></ul></ul>
  32. 32. Scott Adams on Blogs <ul><li>The world sure needs more of ME </li></ul><ul><li>Maybe I’ll shout so others nearby can experience the joy of knowing my thoughts </li></ul><ul><li>No, wait, shouting looks too crazy </li></ul><ul><li>I know – I’ll write down my daily thoughts and badger people to read them </li></ul>
  33. 33. Scott Adams on Blogs <ul><li>If only there was a description of this process that doesn’t involve the words egomaniac or unnecessary </li></ul><ul><li>What? It’s called a blog? I’m there </li></ul>
  34. 34. The blogger’s philosophy <ul><li>“Everything that I think about is more fascinating than the crap in your head.” </li></ul><ul><li>Scott Adams </li></ul>
  35. 35. Comment on Medical Blog <ul><li>“ These medical blogs are just fantastic. I think all too often patients and the Public at large have a strange notion that doctors are somehow almost non-human in the sense of not having ordinary, everyday feelings and concerns common to all humans. We expect them to be miracle workers and superhuman, totally clinical yet warm and caring at the same time.” </li></ul>
  36. 36. Blogs Falling in an Empty Forest Douglas Quenqua, NY Times, June 5, 2009 <ul><li>Technorati: only 7.4 million out the 133 million blogs updated in last 120 days. </li></ul><ul><li>95% of blogs are essentially abandoned </li></ul><ul><li>Why? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Migration to Facebook, Twitter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lack of reader interest </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blogger want to regain privacy </li></ul></ul>
  37. 37. Blogs Falling in an Empty Forest Douglas Quenqua, NY Times, June 5, 2009 <ul><li>“There’s a joke in within the blogging community that most blogs have an audience of one” </li></ul>
  38. 38. Health 2.0 Search Engines <ul><li>Microsoft Health Search </li></ul><ul><li>Praxeon </li></ul><ul><li>Kosmix/Right Health </li></ul><ul><li>Healia </li></ul><ul><li>Healthline Networks </li></ul><ul><li>Organized Wisdom </li></ul>
  39. 39. Health 2.0 Connecting Patients to Doctors <ul><li>Angie’s List Medical </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis Search </li></ul><ul><li>American Well </li></ul><ul><li>ZocDoc </li></ul><ul><li>Health World Web </li></ul>
  40. 40. Few are using HMSA’s Online Care http://www.honoluluadvertiser.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2009905210310 <ul><li>Fewer than 10 people daily using in April </li></ul><ul><li>800 consults in 3.5 month period </li></ul><ul><li>4,000 have signed up to use service (0.3%) </li></ul><ul><li>85% of those who used say excellent or good </li></ul><ul><li>“ I have grave concerns about the safety of Online Care,” Dr. Josh Green </li></ul>
  41. 41. Patient Social Networking Sites <ul><li>Diabetesmine </li></ul><ul><li>I’m Too Young For This! Foundation </li></ul><ul><li>Patientslikeme </li></ul><ul><li>Resolution Health </li></ul><ul><li>Daily Strength </li></ul><ul><li>Sophia’s Garden </li></ul><ul><li>iMedix </li></ul><ul><li>Disaboom </li></ul><ul><li>MedHelp </li></ul><ul><li>HealthCentral Network </li></ul>
  42. 43. Physician Networking Sites <ul><li>Sermo </li></ul><ul><li>MyPACS.net </li></ul><ul><li>Ozmosis </li></ul><ul><li>MedicalPlexus </li></ul><ul><li>Within3 </li></ul><ul><li>iMedExchange </li></ul>
  43. 44. Online Medical Care <ul><li>HelloHealth </li></ul><ul><li>American Well </li></ul><ul><li>Dr Pod </li></ul><ul><li>ISIS (Deb Levine and text messaging for at risk teens) </li></ul>
  44. 45. Health eGames Market Report Douglas Goldstein, et. al. <ul><li>HumanaGames.com </li></ul><ul><li>Kaiser Permanente’s Amazing Food Detective </li></ul><ul><li>HopeLab’s Re-Mission cancer fighting </li></ul><ul><li>Archimage’s $9 million NIH grant and Escape from Diab </li></ul>
  45. 46. Health eGames Market Report Douglas Goldstein, et. al. <ul><li>Exergames </li></ul><ul><li>Brain fitness </li></ul><ul><li>Condition management </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy eating </li></ul><ul><li>Professional training </li></ul>
  46. 47. Health eGames Market Report Douglas Goldstein, et. al. <ul><li>Nintendo Wii and Wii Fit exergames </li></ul><ul><li>29.6 million Wii consoles sold in 19 months at $300 per unit </li></ul><ul><li>www.wiialerts.com </li></ul>
  47. 48. Health eGames Market Report Douglas Goldstein, et. al. <ul><li>Social acceptance of video games </li></ul><ul><ul><li>West Virginia Dance Dance Revolution in 1500 public schools </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Health eGames are Mainstream </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pogo.com 18 million users </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>63% over age 35 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>61% women </li></ul></ul>
  48. 49. Health eGames Market Report Douglas Goldstein, et. al. <ul><li>Clinical research </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Physic Ventures whitepaper </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Debra Lieberman of RWJ $8.25 million </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Re-Mission improved young cancer patients’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Knowledge </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Self-efficacy </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Adherence to prescribed treatment plan </li></ul></ul></ul>
  49. 50. Health eGames Market Report Douglas Goldstein, et. al. <ul><li>Health Plan Involvement </li></ul><ul><li>Humana (HG4H) </li></ul><ul><li>Inland Empire Health Plan exergaming </li></ul><ul><li>CIGNA and HopeLab’s Re-Mission </li></ul><ul><li>CIGNA Virtual Healthcare Community (a patient education island within Second Life) </li></ul><ul><li>Aetna Foundation funded Archimage </li></ul><ul><li>Kaiser’s The Amazing Food Detective </li></ul>
  50. 51. Health eGames Market Report Douglas Goldstein, et. al. <ul><li>Second Life </li></ul><ul><li>Heron Sanctuary </li></ul><ul><li>CIGNA Virtual Healthcare Community </li></ul><ul><li>Ann Myers Medical Center </li></ul>
  51. 52. Medicalization of Cyberspace Andy Miah & Emma Rich, London: Routledge, 2008 <ul><li>Controversy and moral panic </li></ul><ul><li>Auctioning of a kidney on eBay </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bidding reached $5,750,100 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>69% of respondents to online poll thought should be legal </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Pro-Anorexia online movement </li></ul><ul><li>Von Hagens’ Body Worlds exhibition and public autopsy </li></ul><ul><li>www.ronsangels.com (ova and sperm for sale) </li></ul>
  52. 53. Medicalization of Cyberspace Andy Miah & Emma Rich, London: Routledge, 2008 <ul><li>“ Information obtained from the Internet may conflict with recommendations provided by physicians, thus leading to confusion and uncertainty in the mind of patient. The consequences of this uncertainty may lead to a delay in treatment or the patient turning to inappropriate forms of therapy” Henson, 1999 </li></ul><ul><li>Anarchic dismantling of established information systems </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Wikipedia vs. Encyclopedia Britannica </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Literary prizes for bloggers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Physicians losing control of medical information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Catholic Church </li></ul></ul>
  53. 54. Medicalization of Cyberspace Andy Miah & Emma Rich, London: Routledge, 2008 <ul><li>Assessment tools for reliability of Internet information </li></ul><ul><li>Codes of conduct </li></ul><ul><li>Quality labels </li></ul><ul><li>User guides </li></ul><ul><li>Filters </li></ul><ul><li>Third party certifications </li></ul>
  54. 55. Medicalization of Cyberspace Andy Miah & Emma Rich, London: Routledge, 2008 <ul><li>Boundaries between patient and expert are blurred by cyberspace </li></ul><ul><li>Each category loses some aspect of its distinctive modus operandi </li></ul><ul><li>New era of collaborative medicine, partnership health, alternative patient knowledge of health </li></ul>
  55. 56. Medicalization of Cyberspace Andy Miah & Emma Rich, London: Routledge, 2008 <ul><li>Ideal consumerist role </li></ul><ul><li>Passive patient role </li></ul><ul><li>Real patients may pursue both roles simultaneously or variously depending on the context </li></ul><ul><li>“ Belief in hierarchy; somewhere, out at the frontiers of science and engineering…there is a conviction from patients that a solution must exist” for each and every medical problem. </li></ul>
  56. 57. Medicalization of Cyberspace Andy Miah & Emma Rich, London: Routledge, 2008 <ul><li>“ Unlike the classic sick role relationship where the doctor told the patient what was wrong and what s/he had to do or take to get better, in the information age the patient is just as likely to tell the doctor what might be wrong and outline a range of possible risks, treatments or therapies.” Nettleton </li></ul>
  57. 58. Medicalization of Cyberspace Andy Miah & Emma Rich, London: Routledge, 2008 <ul><li>Emergence of networks that might be harmful to the patient </li></ul><ul><li>Eating disorders </li></ul><ul><li>Self-harm </li></ul><ul><li>Cyber-suicide </li></ul><ul><li>Cyber-cannialism </li></ul>
  58. 59. Medicalization of Cyberspace Andy Miah & Emma Rich, London: Routledge, 2008 <ul><li>Who owns online communities? </li></ul><ul><li>What legal claims can be made over them? </li></ul><ul><li>Who should regulate online communities? </li></ul><ul><li>Does MD consultant to website have ethical/legal obligations to visitors? </li></ul><ul><li>Can traditional therapy be translated to Internet or is it a new form (e-therapy)? </li></ul><ul><li>Should MD licenses be by state? </li></ul><ul><li>At what point is there a patient/provider relationship? </li></ul>
  59. 60. ICSI Online <ul><li>www.icsi.org </li></ul><ul><li>http://icsihealthcareblog.wordpress.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>ICSI on Facebook </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ICSIorg </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Kentbotttles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Norskedoc </li></ul></ul>

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