K. class v glass ionomer

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K. class v glass ionomer

  1. 1. GLASS IONOMER
  2. 2.  These tooth-coloured materials were introduced in 1972 for use as restorative materials for anterior teeth (particularly for eroded areas, Class III and V cavties).
  3. 3.  bond chemically to dental hard tissues and release fluoride for a relatively long period
  4. 4.  restorationof carious lesions in low- stress areas such as smooth-surface and small anterior proximal cavities in primary teeth
  5. 5. GICs are commonly classified into four principal types:
  6. 6. GICs are commonly classified into four principal types:Conventional Glass Ionomer Cements
  7. 7. GICs are commonly classified into four principal types:Conventional Glass Ionomer CementsHybrid Ionomer Cements (Also known as Light or Chemical Cured Resin-modified Glass Ionomer or Dual-cured Glass Ionomer Cements)
  8. 8. Tri-cure Glass Ionomer Cements
  9. 9. Tri-cure Glass Ionomer CementsMetal-reinforced Glass Ionomer Cements
  10. 10. Composition and preparation
  11. 11. Composition and preparationGIC Powder
  12. 12. Composition and preparationGIC Powder powder is an acid-soluble calcium fluoroaluminosilicate glass (similar to that of silicate) but with a higher alumina-silicate ratio that increases its reactivity with liquid.
  13. 13.  fluoride
  14. 14.  fluoride Lanthanum, Strontium, Barium or Zinc Oxide additives provide radioopacity.
  15. 15.  the raw materials are:
  16. 16.  the raw materials are: Silica 41.9%
  17. 17.  the raw materials are: Silica 41.9% Alumina 28.6%
  18. 18.  the raw materials are: Silica 41.9% Alumina 28.6% Aluminum Fluoride 1.6%
  19. 19.  the raw materials are: Silica 41.9% Alumina 28.6% Aluminum Fluoride 1.6% Calcium Fluoride 15.7%
  20. 20.  the raw materials are: Silica 41.9% Alumina 28.6% Aluminum Fluoride 1.6% Calcium Fluoride 15.7% Sodium Fluoride 9.3%
  21. 21.  the raw materials are: Silica 41.9% Alumina 28.6% Aluminum Fluoride 1.6% Calcium Fluoride 15.7% Sodium Fluoride 9.3% Aluminum Phosphate 3.8%
  22. 22. GIC Liquid
  23. 23. GIC Liquid Originally, the liquids for GIC were aqueous solutions of polyacrylic acid in a concentration of about 40 to 50%.
  24. 24. GIC Liquid Originally, the liquids for GIC were aqueous solutions of polyacrylic acid in a concentration of about 40% to 50%.
  25. 25.  Theliquid consists of acid is in the form of co-polymer with itaconic, maleic or tricarboxylic acids.
  26. 26.  Tartaric acid is also present in the liquid. It improves handling characteristics and increases the working time, but it shortens the setting time.
  27. 27. Manipulation:
  28. 28. Manipulation:1. Surface of the prepared tooth must be clean and dry
  29. 29. Manipulation:1. Surface of the prepared tooth must be clean and dry2. The consistency of the mixed cement must allow complete coating of the surface irregularities
  30. 30. 3. Excess cement must be remove at the appropriate time
  31. 31. 3. Excess cement must be remove at the appropriate time4. The surface must be finished without excessive drying
  32. 32. 3. Excess cement must be remove at the appropriate time4. The surface must be finished without excessive drying5. Protection of the restoration surface must be ensured to prevent cracking or dissolution.
  33. 33.  The conditions are similar for lutting applications, except that no surface finishing is needed.
  34. 34. Setting Time:
  35. 35. Setting Time: GIC TYPE 1 - 5-7minutes
  36. 36. Setting Time: GIC TYPE 1 - 5-7minutes GIC TYPE 2 - within 10minutes
  37. 37. Advantages:
  38. 38. Advantages: Inherent adhesion to tooth structure
  39. 39. Advantages: Inherent adhesion to tooth structure High retention rate
  40. 40. Advantages: Inherent adhesion to tooth structure High retention rate Little shrinkage and good marginal seal
  41. 41. Advantages: Inherent adhesion to tooth structure High retention rate Little shrinkage and good marginal seal Fluoride release and hence caries inhibition
  42. 42.  Biocompatible
  43. 43.  Biocompatible Minimal cavity preparation required hence easy to use on children in and suitable for use even in absence of skilled dental manpower and facilities (such as in ART)
  44. 44. Disadvantages
  45. 45. Disadvantages: Brittle
  46. 46. Disadvantages: Brittle Soluble
  47. 47. Disadvantages: Brittle Soluble Abrasive
  48. 48. Disadvantages: Brittle Soluble Abrasive Water sensitive during setting phase.
  49. 49.  Some products release less fluoride then conventional GIC
  50. 50.  Some products release less fluoride then conventional GIC Not inherently radiopaque though addition of radiodense additives such as barium can alter radiodensity
  51. 51.  Some products release less fluoride then conventional GIC Not inherently radiopaque though addition of radiodense additives such as barium can alter radiodensity Less aesthetic then composite
  52. 52. Uses:
  53. 53. Uses: Type I - For luting cements
  54. 54. Uses: Type I - For luting cements Type II - For restorations
  55. 55. Uses: Type I - For luting cements Type II - For restorations Type III - Liners and bases
  56. 56. Uses: Type I - For luting cements Type II - For restorations Type III - Liners and bases Type IV - Fissure sealants
  57. 57. Uses: Type I - For luting cements Type II - For restorations Type III - Liners and bases Type IV - Fissure sealants Type V - Orthodontic Cements
  58. 58. Uses: Type I - For luting cements Type II - For restorations Type III - Liners and bases Type IV - Fissure sealants Type V - Orthodontic Cements Type VI - Core build up

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