Information managing as designing        informing        inspiring              innovatingpresentation: rik maes    EMIM,...
Information /        Business   communication    Technology  Strategy StructureOperations
processesstructures                           data                         systems        functions                    rel...
Why IM instruments don’t come up            to the mark1.  Reality is complex and messy2.  Every model is less than realit...
in balans?     inspiring             informing
Informing                           Inspiringstructure                           meaningprescribing, standardizing        ...
A lot of people seewhat is happening  and ask ‘why?’Some people seewhat could happenand ask ‘why not?’
Herbert A. Simon   The Sciences of the Artificial, 1996“Engineering, medecine, business, architecture,and painting are con...
The dominant mindset of managing     decision making                        designing•  Choice between alternatives       ...
Visions on                                 management                          practical scientistreflective practitioner ...
What now matters is the              In the end, design is about shaping a context, ratherdesign and delivery of value.   ...
What I learned from Friso Kramer       •    Models are not pre-representations of the end result, but            sources o...
What I learned from Dana Ponec1.  Your person     •  You have to take a personal stance (what do you        really want to...
desirable (people)         feasible (technology)               viable (business)          “You cannot have brilliant ideas...
Use of model:    ≠ representation of end product    ≠ authorization by customer    = “learning about your ideas”          ...
bricolageimprovisation                            tinkering       drift                       caring hospitality
Our preliminary conclusions1.     Start from real-life       experience, not from       abstract models2.     Imagination ...
Networking                QuestioningExperimenting Associating Observing
Observing     NetworkingReal world                Voelbaar       HaalbaarIdeal world              Associating   Experiment...
The Christmas’ tree approach          network-            ing        experimenting          associating          observing
Information managing as designing
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Information managing as designing

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Informing
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Information managing as designing

  1. 1. Information managing as designing informing inspiring innovatingpresentation: rik maes EMIM, February 2011 photo: michiel hendryckx
  2. 2. Information / Business communication Technology Strategy StructureOperations
  3. 3. processesstructures data systems functions relationsintentions information ideas emotions involvement
  4. 4. Why IM instruments don’t come up to the mark1.  Reality is complex and messy2.  Every model is less than reality3.  The technical bias4.  “Carbon copy” approaches5.  The diarrhoea of projects6.  Narcissism of the management involved Claudio Ciborra7.  Exagerrated expectations
  5. 5. in balans? inspiring informing
  6. 6. Informing Inspiringstructure meaningprescribing, standardizing interpreting, exploringnorms valuesbinding, materializing innovating, disruptiveidentity confirming identity questioningorganizations, systems ideas, brandsunivocal, unambiguous multivocal, ambiguouscontroling the unexpected welcoming the unexpectedexcess: standstill excess: chaosideal: inspiring through ordering ideal: forming through ideas
  7. 7. A lot of people seewhat is happening and ask ‘why?’Some people seewhat could happenand ask ‘why not?’
  8. 8. Herbert A. Simon The Sciences of the Artificial, 1996“Engineering, medecine, business, architecture,and painting are concerned not with the necessary Intelligencebut with the contingent – not how things are Designbut how they might be – in short, with design” Choice “Our professional responsibility is not to discover the laws of the universe, but to act responsibly in the world by transforming existing situations into more preferred ones”“We should leave more possibilities open to future generations than we ourselves inherited”
  9. 9. The dominant mindset of managing decision making designing•  Choice between alternatives •  Generate alternatives•  Assumptions: •  Assumption: –  generating alternatives is –  the more complex the easy world is, the more important –  choosing between it becomes to generate valid alternatives is all-important alternatives•  Problem: transforming decisions •  “Designing = specifying an into actions outline for action” (Webster)•  Information systems: •  Information systems: –  management reporting systems –  implementing a vision –  looking backwards –  proactive
  10. 10. Visions on management practical scientistreflective practitioner business designer practical author
  11. 11. What now matters is the In the end, design is about shaping a context, ratherdesign and delivery of value. than taking it as it is. When it comes to design, Really, what were doing asThat needs design thinking. success arises not by emulating others, but by using designers is, ultimately, andThat needs creative thinking. organizational assets and integrative thinking to inevitably, designing the businessJudgment thinking alone is identify, build on, and leverage asymmetries, evolving of the companies that werenot going to be enough. Most unique models, products and experiences -- in short, creative business solutions. working for. Whether you like it orpeople, in business and not, the more innovative you tryelsewhere, have done very Roger Martin, The Design of Business, 2004 to be, the more you are going towell on judgment thinking. affect the business and theSuch people are rarely aware business model.of the need for design Tim Brown, speech at thethinking. They find it difficult This role of manager as designer is hardly Rotman Business Designto conceive that there is a mentioned in the literature, and barely Conference, 2005whole other aspect of thinking acknowledged in businessthat is different from judgment practice. ...Managers practice "silentthinking. It is not that such design"...the many decisions taken by non- designers who enter directly into the design Companies that are successful exploit-people are complacent. It is process, no matter how unaware they or ing the full potential of design do sosimply that they do not know others may be of their impact. because its present in all of the deci-that there is another aspect to Angela Dumas and Henry Mintzberg, sions the company makes. Thesethinking. Managing the Form, Function, and Fit of companies arent choosing to applyEdward de Bono, Why So Design, 1991 design to their respective businessStupid? How the Human Race strategies, but have chosen design ashas Never Really Learned to the fundamental strategy itself. DesignThink, 2003 is the philosophical core of the compa- ny. Everyone in the company becomes involved in designing, whether that We believe having designers in the mix is key to success in multidisciplinary means creating financial plans or se- collaboration and critical to uncovering unexplored areas of innovation. lecting casing materials for an industrial Designers provide a methodology that all parties can embrace and a design product. Design isnt something that the environment conducive to innovation. In our experience, design thinking is the design department does. Its a way of glue that holds these kinds of communities together and makes them operating the company. Its an ongoing successful. set of choices about how the company David Kelley, Dave Beach, George Kembel, Larry Leifer, Jim Patell, Bernie is going to exist, to compete, to grow. Roth, Bob Sutton, and Terry Winograd, founders of the Stanford University John Zapolski, Design as a Core Institute of Design, 2005 Strategy, 2005
  12. 12. What I learned from Friso Kramer •  Models are not pre-representations of the end result, but sources of inspiration: “tools for thinking and feeling” •  Designing is an open mind activity: “If I would know in advance how it will turn out, I wouldn’t even start” •  A designer must clear his mind in order to approach a problem innocently •  Designing is leaving out the unnecessary •  Whatever you design, it should never hinder •  A designer must constantly train his empathy •  The most difficult customer is the best one, provided she is competent and inspired •  A good designer goes beyond his customer’s belief in what is necessary
  13. 13. What I learned from Dana Ponec1.  Your person •  You have to take a personal stance (what do you really want to achieve?) •  You should believe in yourself, but not become overconfident (you are not the most important person!) •  You are a craftsman, hence choose deliberately from whom you want to learn the craft2.  Your method of working •  Thinking according to models only never leads to a viable solution; worrying and try-outs are quite normal •  Accept uncertainty, there is no best solution •  You design for more people than the customer only •  Live with your customer and his situation-at-hand •  Show possibilities, even if unachievable •  Make it your customer’s design •  Imagine you use your own end product
  14. 14. desirable (people) feasible (technology) viable (business) “You cannot have brilliant ideas in the abstract”Learning from analogous situations Learning from extreme cases
  15. 15. Use of model: ≠ representation of end product ≠ authorization by customer = “learning about your ideas” Storytelling (in feasibility phase) “Result without story is worthless”Engagement with a better world is“part of your business strategy” Encourage experimenting beyond the assignment and working according to planVisualize, create a working space where you can livetogether with your design
  16. 16. bricolageimprovisation tinkering drift caring hospitality
  17. 17. Our preliminary conclusions1.  Start from real-life experience, not from abstract models2.  Imagination doesn’t accept limits3.  Continuous dialogue with all parties involved4.  The importance of passion, engagement and creativity
  18. 18. Networking QuestioningExperimenting Associating Observing
  19. 19. Observing NetworkingReal world Voelbaar HaalbaarIdeal world Associating Experimenting Denkbaar Maakbaar
  20. 20. The Christmas’ tree approach network- ing experimenting associating observing

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