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A Psychosocial Intervention: Perceived      Behavioural Control and Breakfast Eating                    Frequency         ...
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Emily Kothe - ASBHM - A Psychosocial Intervention: Perceived Behavioural Control and Breakfast Eating Frequency

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Emily Kothe - ASBHM - A Psychosocial Intervention: Perceived Behavioural Control and Breakfast Eating Frequency

  1. 1. A Psychosocial Intervention: Perceived Behavioural Control and Breakfast Eating Frequency Emily Kothe & Barbara Mullan School of Psychology, The University of Sydney, AustraliaPurpose However, changes in TPB variables were not a significant predictor of change in breakfast consumption between baseline and follow-upIn Australia approximately 39% of young when controlling for condition.adults eat breakfast less than 5 days perweek, with 15% reporting rarely or never Attitude Changeeating breakfast (Australian Bureau of -.008 .082 R2 =.074Statistics, 1997) Condition .267** Subjective Norm .265 Behaviour Change Change .528** PBCRecent research has shown that the Change -.126Theory of Planned Behaviour [TPB] (Azjen,1991) can be meaningfully applied to Figure 6: Change in TPB variables as a predictor of changebreakfast consumption (Wong & Mullan, in behaviour with standardized regression coefficients (β). (Note * p <.05; **p<.001)2008), and may be a fruitful avenue for anintervention targeting breakfast eating Figure 1. Sample 1 of the intervention taskfrequency. Conclusion The intervention does appear to be effective in changing target cognitions, however changes in these thought processes do not appear to be effectively translated to changes in behaviour. Therefore interventions need to consider how best to transform these changed cognitions into changes in behaviour.This study considered the use of atheoretically derived breakfast eating Figure 2. Sample 2 of the intervention taskintervention based on the TPB.The aim of the study was to examine the Resultseffects of a brief, web-based, psychosocialintervention targeting PBC andsupplemented by implementation As expected TPB variables at baseline wereintentions. found to predict breakfast consumption. Attitudes -0.024The influence of the intervention on R2 = .368** R2 = .520**attitude, subjective norm, perceived Subjective Norm .197 Intention .704** Behaviourbehaviour control [PBC], intention and .535**behaviour was investigated. PBC .187 Figure 2: Model 1 with standardized regression coefficients (β). (Note * p <.05; ** p<.001)Methods The intervention led to significant increases inA randomised controlled trial was subjective norm…conducted to determine the outcomes of Figure 4. Acknowledgmentsthe intervention at four week follow-up. Subjective Norm over Time by This study would not have been possible without the time Group and effort of those who participated in this research. AsParticipants (N=74) were randomly always they have our deepest gratitude. The authors wouldallocated to either the control or also like to thank Rajith Amaratunga and Cara Wong for theirintervention group. support. and PBC over the course of the studyTPB variables and behaviour were compared to the control condition. Referencesmeasured at baseline and four weeks later. Figure 5.Within and between group differences on PBC overtarget variables were considered and Ajzen, I. (1991). The theory of planned behavior. Organizational Behavior Time by and Human Decision Processes, 50(2), 179-211.regression analyses were conducted to Group Australian Bureau of Statistics. (1997). National Nutrition Survey:determine the relationship between Selected Highlights, Australia, 1995 Canberra.condition, TPB variables, intention, and Wong, C., & Mullan, B. (2008). Predicting Breakfast Consumption: An application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour and thebehaviour Investigation of Past Behaviour and Executive Function. British Journal of Health Psychology. (In Press)

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