Teen Tech Week                                        Program Proposal                                   Documenting the O...
Part 1: Program ProposalIntroduction       Under the direction of staff from the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh Downtown-B...
teens can engage with their community in a way that both develops their media literacy and deepenstheir understanding of t...
Back at the library, the full group will meet to talk about the experience at the camp. Each groupwill be assigned a compu...
resources he or she needs to develop and flourish as a creator.Evaluation       We will evaluate our success through two m...
Works CitedFolkenflik, David. “Tracking the Medias Eye on Occupy Wall Street.” NPR.org 13 Oct. 2011. Web. 26       Nov. 20...
Part 2 – One-Page SynopsisName: Emily FearName of Program: Documenting the Occupation: A Global Movement from the Teen Per...
computers loaded with programs. Signs made and posted to designate event area. Call all participantsto confirm participati...
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Fear emily teen_techweekproposal_lis2633_fall11

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Fear emily teen_techweekproposal_lis2633_fall11

  1. 1. Teen Tech Week Program Proposal Documenting the Occupation: A Global Movement from the Teen Perspective Emily Fear LIS 2633 Technology in the Lives of Children and Youth Fall 2011 11/28/2011Fear, Emily – Teen Tech Week Proposal 1
  2. 2. Part 1: Program ProposalIntroduction Under the direction of staff from the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh Downtown-Business branch,teens will create a multimedia work documenting Occupy Pittsburgh. Participants will be led on asupervised site visit where they will then utilize digital media tools to record various aspects of theencampment. Following the visit, the teens will use library resources to turn their individual recordingsinto a single creative work. This program will run for two and a half hours and is intended for teenagers between the ages offourteen and nineteen. Because the scheduled activities includes an offsite trip, written parental orguardian permission will be required for all participants. Please note that this activity is not a politicalaction. The teens will be serving in a journalistic context and creating a document of their collectedperspectives. The staff working with the teens will encourage impartiality in the recording process, but willnot be censoring or altering the produced work to align with any particular political beliefs.ProposalRationale Since beginning in New York City in September 2011, The Occupy Movement has sinceexpanded to major cities all around the world, attracting attention across every news media platform.This media coverage has done much to spread awareness of the Occupations, but it has also beencriticized of being biased or willfully one-sided in its portrayals of the events (Folkenflik n.p.). One of thekey aspects of new media literacy is to develop an understanding of the role media plays in “shapingperceptions, beliefs and attitudes” (Thollman and Jolls 9). This is an opportunity for teens to directlyexperience and comment on an event of national and international importance. In doing so, they will beable to better consider the ways in which media has influenced their own perceptions.Goals and Objectives We believe that this program perfectly encapsulates the Carnegie Library of Pittsburghscommitment to encouraging citizenship, and civic participation. Through the use of digital media tools,Fear, Emily – Teen Tech Week Proposal 2
  3. 3. teens can engage with their community in a way that both develops their media literacy and deepenstheir understanding of the world immediately around them. Among the new media literacy skills that willbe engaged through this two-part process: Multitasking, “transmedia navigation” (Jenkins 4),information seeking, collaboration, and the intelligent and creative assembling of information. In additionto building these skills, we believe this program will further promote the librarys digital and non-digitalresources to teenagers and their parents. We expect that this experience will encourage many teens toreturn to the library to utilize these resources as well as attend future events.The Program The planning of the program will begin two months in advance to Teen Tech Week. First we willreach out to the Occupy Pittsburgh media team for assistance in our visit to the camp. They will also beable to help us with alternatives if the camp gets shut down prior to the date of the program. Staffinvolved in the program will visit the camp to meet with various members and assess the basic layout.This will alert us to any issues that we might face when visiting the camp with the teenagers.Promotional materials will be released around the same time. The next step will be to gather and review the digital media tools to be used for the program,including both recording devices and computer software. The staff involved in the program will gothrough a series of tutorials to gain a basic understanding of the tools being used. In the weeks leadingup to the event, enrolled participants should be confirmed and parental permission should be received.Follow-up calls and emails to our Occupy liaisons will be made. Reservations on certain librarycomputers and tables will be made for the date of the program. On the day of the event, a meeting space will be clearly designated. Staff and teens will firstmeet for introductions and instructions. The teens will then break into smaller groups. Each group willbe given a recording device. They will be given five to ten minutes to experiment with the equipment,then the staff will lead the teens up the street to the Occupy Pittsburgh Camp. The full group will meetwith the camps media coordinator, then each supervised group will have 30 minutes of recording time.After 30 minutes, the full group will meet again and head back to the library.Fear, Emily – Teen Tech Week Proposal 3
  4. 4. Back at the library, the full group will meet to talk about the experience at the camp. Each groupwill be assigned a computer where they can review and edit their recordings. Each group will choose aportion to use, such as a one-minute audio clip, or a three-minute piece of footage. Working togetherwith staff guidance, they will put these portions together into a single work, which will then be posted tothe library website.Resources There will need to be at least one staff member per small group (with the number of small groupsno more than four), so the amount of required staff should range from four to five. This can include anadult intern or volunteer, provided he/she has a familiarity with basic digital media technology. We willneed four digital media recording devices: A digital camera, a digital video camera, a digital audiorecording device, and a mobile device with the ability to capture pictures and video. The appropriatebattery chargers and connecting cables will also be required. At least four to five computer stations willneed to be reserved for the program. Software that allows for images, video, and audio editing will benecessary, but many of these tools can be utilized for free or cheap online. Promotional costs will beminimal, mainly for the printing of posters and cards.Collaboration Although it is a creative collaboration with Occupy Pittsburgh, it is important to stress toparticipants, their parents or guardians, and to anyone interested in the program that this is not apolitical partnership. This is an opportunity for teens to document an event of potential large-scaleimportance to their city. By reaching out to organizing members of the camp, we do not seek to build apartnership so much as we hope to better ensure the safety of the teenagers when they visit the camp.Diversity Because the Occupy Movement is focused on a variety of social causes, economic and diversityissues are sure to be discussed in the process of documentation. Also, by using a variety of recordingdevices, we hope to showcase the sophisticated creative work that even low-end tools can produce. Wehope to promote the library as a place where anyone on either side of the Digital Divide can access theFear, Emily – Teen Tech Week Proposal 4
  5. 5. resources he or she needs to develop and flourish as a creator.Evaluation We will evaluate our success through two means: The work created by the participating group ofteens, and the rate of teen use of library digital resources in the months following the program. Thepermission slip will include an option for parents or guardians to allow the use of the teens name, but itis not mandatory. Anonymity will be guaranteed to those who express the desire for it.Conclusion We believe that by creatively engaging in a newsworthy event, this program will encourage andenable the development of new media literacy skills in our teen patrons. Sincere thanks to Nancy Cohen Todd and Kaitlyn Wittig for their guidance and advice in thecrafting of this program proposal.Fear, Emily – Teen Tech Week Proposal 5
  6. 6. Works CitedFolkenflik, David. “Tracking the Medias Eye on Occupy Wall Street.” NPR.org 13 Oct. 2011. Web. 26 Nov. 2011.Jenkins, Henry, et. al. Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education in the 21st Century. Chicago, Illinois: MacArthur Foundation, 2006. PDF.Thollman, Elizabeth and Tessa Jolls. Literacy for the 21st Century: An Overview and Orientation Guide to Media Literacy Education. Center for Media Literacy, 2003. PDF. Additional ResourcesTeen Tech Week – Geek Out @ your library, March 4-10, 2012. YALSA, 2011. Web. 22 Nov. 2011.Fear, Emily – Teen Tech Week Proposal 6
  7. 7. Part 2 – One-Page SynopsisName: Emily FearName of Program: Documenting the Occupation: A Global Movement from the Teen PerspectiveSummary: Teens will create a multimedia work documenting Occupy Pittsburgh. Participants will be ledon a supervised site visit where they will then utilize digital media tools to record various aspects of theencampment. Following the visit, the teens will use library resources to turn their individual recordingsinto a single creative work.Intended audience: Teens between the ages of 14 and 19. Due to the offsite visit, parental or guardianpermission will be required to participate. The number of participants is limited to sixteen, withenrollment being on a first-come, first-served basis.Rationale for the program: News media coverage has done much to spread awareness of theOccupations, but it has also been criticized of being biased or willfully one-sided in its portrayals of theevents. This is an opportunity for teens to directly experience and comment on an event of national andinternational importance. In doing so, they will be able to better consider the ways in which media hasinfluenced their own perceptions.Resources required:- Four to five staff members (can include adult interns or volunteers)- Two months of planning before event date- Contact with the Occupy Pittsburgh media team- Four to five computer stations reserved for the event date- Computer programs to edit video, audio, and images- Digital camera- Digital video camera- Digital audio recorder- Mobile device capable of capturing images and video- Cables and chargers for each device- Promotional posters and cards- Website and blog advertising- Permission form to be made available online- One large table for group meeting and brainstormingPlan of Action:- Two months before the event date: Reach out to Occupy Pittsburgh media team. Take preliminary visitto the camp to meet with media coordinator. Set hard date for visit, as well as contingency plan if campis shut down prior to event date.- 45 days before the event date: Release promotional material. Gather recording devices (mobile devicecan be lent for review purposes, then returned to owner until date of event). Have event staff meeting toreview computer program options for video, audio, and image editing.- 30 days before event date: Two-hour staff tutorial on computer programs being used for event.Reserves placed on library computers for event date.- Two weeks before event date: Confirm enrollments, being sure to account for each attendeescompleted permission form. Follow-up with Occupy Pittsburgh media coordinator.- One week before event date: Confirm final enrollment number. One hour event staff meeting to reviewthe events activities and consider any issues that might be unresolved.- Day before event date: Final confirmation with OP media coordinator. All devices charing, all reservedFear, Emily – Teen Tech Week Proposal 7
  8. 8. computers loaded with programs. Signs made and posted to designate event area. Call all participantsto confirm participation for the next day.- Day of event – Teens brought to meeting table for introductions and instructions. They will then be ledon a 30-minute site visit to the OP camp, breaking into smaller groups to record their visit. Following thevisit, they will return to the library where they will compile their recordings into one work. Work will thenbe posted to library website and blog.- One day following event – An email “Thank You” will go out to each of the participants, which willinclude a link to the groups project.Fear, Emily – Teen Tech Week Proposal 8

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