White PaperSTORAGE TIERING FOR VMWAREENVIRONMENTS DEPLOYED ONEMC SYMMETRIX VMAX WITH ENGINUITY 5876The use of FAST VP (Vir...
Copyright © 2012 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.EMC believes the information in this publication is accurate ofits p...
Table of ContentsExecutive summary...........................................................................................
Conclusion ............................................................................................................ 67...
List of FiguresFigure 1. Version 1.1 of Unisphere for VMAX ..................................................................
Figure 43. FAST VP general settings in Unisphere ............................................................................
Executive summary            Unlike storage arrays of the past, today’s enterprise-class storage arrays contain           ...
storage can be moved around nondisruptively using FAST VP technology, resulting inthe right data on the right storage tier...
EMC Unisphere for VMAXBeginning with Enginuity 5876, Symmetrix Management Console has beentransformed into EMC® Unisphere™...
•   Perform root cause analysis•   View Symmetrix system heat maps•   Execute scheduled and ongoing reports (queries), and...
Management, and SRDF SRA Utilities. Storage Viewer functionality extends theVMware vSphere Client to facilitate the discov...
Figure 3. VSI 5.3 Storage Viewer featureOracle ApplicationsOracle Applications is a tightly integrated family of Financial...
There are four benchmarks included with SwingBench: Order Entry (jdbc), Order Entry(PL/SQL), Calling Circle, and a set of ...
When a write is performed to a portion of the thin device, the Symmetrix allocates aminimum allotment of physical storage ...
Fully Automated Storage Tiering (FAST)           Fully Automated Storage Tiering (FAST) automates the identification of da...
•   FAST policy — Manages a set of tier usage rules that provide guidelines for data    placement and movement across Symm...
FAST VP has two modes of operation, Automatic or Off. When operating in Automaticmode, data analysis and data movements wi...
full, regardless of performance metrics, then FAST VP will allocate from one of theother thin pools in the policy. As long...
volumes by moving them between thin pools in a given FAST or FAST VPconfiguration. This manual “override” option helps FAS...
could be manually moved to FC or EFD. Conversely a datastore residing on FC thathouses data needing to be archived could b...
Figure 8. Thin LUN distribution across pools viewed through UnisphereThis TDEV is currently under FAST VP control and is p...
existing FAST VP policy, the user can prevent the FAST engine from looking at thedevice’s statistics and making changes by...
Figure 10. Pinning a device in Unisphere                                    Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deploy...
For the CLI, use symdev to pin the device as in Figure 11:Figure 11. Pinning a device through SYMCLIOnce the device is pin...
possible to move the device to a different pool and symmigrate will bind the deviceto that pool, completely transparent to...
Once the migration is complete the status will change from “SyncInProg” to“Migrated”. When it is in the migrated state, th...
Figure 15. The thin LUN reallocated to a single poolFigure 16. The reallocated LUN in UnisphereChanging disk and RAID type...
reason a customer might perform this type of migration is for a device not under FASTVP control and when business requirem...
Figure 18. Thin LUN 26B located in a SATA poolThe TDEV now will be migrated from thin pool SATA_Pool to FC_Pool, which is ...
Figure 19. FC_Pool thin pool containing the Fibre Channel diskFirst, the device for the migration is validated as seen in ...
Figure 21. Query the migration sessionIn this case, with the device having only part of its 100 GB allocated, the migratio...
Recall that all this migration activity has been transparent to the user andnondisruptive to the application. If one now v...
Figure 24. Thin LUN 26B in a RAID 1 configurationFAST VP and Oracle Applications 12Applications ArchitectureThe Oracle App...
become an issue. In order to mimic a more realistic production environment,therefore, the architecture of the FAST VP test...
and represents a significant advancement over 10g in performance and functionality.              Second, Oracle has now di...
user-specified size (uniform). This choice of extent management types means thatlocally managed tablespaces offer greater ...
Use case implementationIn this example, Oracle Applications release 12 was installed using Oracle’s pre-configured and see...
the database containing the Financial modules is located. A policy is then set up thatdictates how much space is to be mad...
Static tablespace placementAs Oracle Applications is powered by an Oracle database, there are a number ofdatabase objects ...
Hardware layoutFigure 27. Physical/virtual environment diagramFAST VP configurationThe first step to showcase the FAST VP ...
Figure 28. Enabling FAST VP using EMC Unisphere for VMAX                                  Storage Tiering for VMware Envir...
Figure 29. Determining the state of the FAST VP engine using SYMCLIAfter enabling the engine, there are a number of steps ...
In order to use FAST VP, at least two different disk technologies are required. Fromthese disks, the thin pools can be bui...
Configuring FAST VPThe five steps to configure FAST VP are as follows:Step 1 - Create storage tiersThree storage tiers wer...
Figure 33. Creating a storage tier in UnisphereStep 2 – Create the storage groupThis again can be done via the CLI or Unis...
Figure 34. Storage group for FAST VP in EMC UnisphereA view of the storage group as seen from VMware ESXi using EMC Virtua...
Step 3 - Create a FAST VP policyThe CLI syntax for creating the policy is included below in Figure 36. The GUI interfacefo...
Figure 37. Listing the FAST VP policy in CLI                                      Storage Tiering for VMware Environments ...
Figure 38. Creating a FAST VP policy in Unisphere                                    Storage Tiering for VMware Environmen...
Step 4 - Associate the storage group with the new policyTo associate the storage group from Figure 36 to the newly created...
Figure 40. Associating a storage group to a FAST policy in UnisphereOne can now list the details of the association, inclu...
Figure 41. FAST VP policy association with demand detail                                   Storage Tiering for VMware Envi...
Similar demand details can be obtained from the Unisphere interface as shown inFigure 42.Figure 42. FAST VP policy managem...
Figure 43. FAST VP general settings in Unisphere                                    Storage Tiering for VMware Environment...
Figure 44. Setting FAST VP performance and movement time windowsWith the general FAST VP environment configured, the testi...
Oracle Applications case study using FAST VP performancemonitoringFor the purposes of this example, the following assumpti...
Figure 45. Using symvm to translate Linux database mounts on the FASTDB VMTo see this information at a high level, use VSI...
Figure 46. Virtual disk mapping in the EMC VSI Storage Viewer featureViewing the path management owner of the device in VS...
Figure 47. Thin device bound to the pool containing SATA drivesNow that all the specific FAST VP setup activities are comp...
Figure 48. Total size of the Order Entry applicationSwingBench was used to simulate the workload by executing those transa...
Figure 49. Order Entry benchmarkAs the parameters for FAST are set to analyze two hours’ worth of statistics (aspreviously...
Figure 50. FAST VP move modePer the FAST settings, about an hour after the benchmark completes, the FAST enginebegins movi...
Figure 51. Initial track movement for the database thin deviceAfter a time (about an hour), as seen in Figure 52, the init...
SATA to EFD and FC. The output demonstrates that 11 GB of the Order Entry              application has been re-tiered to E...
Figure 54. Mid-run of the Order Entry benchmarkBy simply transposing the average response times for each run on a graph, t...
Figure 55. Transaction response time comparing pre-FAST VP and post-FAST VPmovementReviewing the graph, the post-FAST VP m...
placed on EFD, the second on Fibre Channel, and the least or not at all remaining onSATA. All three tiers are utilized bas...
White Paper: Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5875
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White Paper: Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5875

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This white paper demonstrates how EMC Fully Automated Storage Tiering with Virtual Pools (FAST VP) technology can be used effectively in an environment virtualized using VMware technologies.

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White Paper: Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5875

  1. 1. White PaperSTORAGE TIERING FOR VMWAREENVIRONMENTS DEPLOYED ONEMC SYMMETRIX VMAX WITH ENGINUITY 5876The use of FAST VP (Virtual Pools) in VMware environments Abstract As a business’s virtualization storage needs continue to expand, the challenge of where to put data throughout its lifecycle is ever present. With EMC’s extended Fully Automated Storage Tiering with Virtual Pools (FAST VP) functionality, this problem is addressed through the automation of data movement to the right disk tier, at the right time. This white paper will demonstrate how this technology can be used effectively in an environment virtualized using VMware® technologies. September 2012
  2. 2. Copyright © 2012 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.EMC believes the information in this publication is accurate ofits publication date. The information is subject to changewithout notice.The information in this publication is provided “as is”. EMCCorporation makes no representations or warranties of any kindwith respect to the information in this publication, andspecifically disclaims implied warranties of merchantability orfitness for a particular purpose.Use, copying, and distribution of any EMC software described inthis publication requires an applicable software license.For the most up-to-date listing of EMC product names, see EMCCorporation Trademarks on EMC.com.VMware, ESXi, ESXi, vMotion, and vSphere are registeredtrademarks or trademarks of VMware, Inc. in the United Statesand/or other jurisdictions. All other trademarks used herein arethe property of their respective owners.Part Number h8101.4 Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 2 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  3. 3. Table of ContentsExecutive summary.................................................................................................. 7 Audience ............................................................................................................................ 8 Terminology ....................................................................................................................... 8Symmetrix VMAX using Enginuity 5876 .................................................................... 8EMC Unisphere for VMAX ......................................................................................... 9EMC Virtual Storage Integrator ............................................................................... 10Oracle Applications ............................................................................................... 12SwingBench .......................................................................................................... 12Symmetrix Virtual Provisioning .............................................................................. 13Federated Tiered Storage (FTS): Overview ............................................................... 14Fully Automated Storage Tiering (FAST) .................................................................. 15 FAST and Fully Automated Storage Tiering with Virtual Pools (FAST VP) ............................. 15 FAST managed objects ..................................................................................................... 15 FAST VP components ........................................................................................................ 16FAST VP allocation by FAST Policy .......................................................................... 17FAST VP SRDF coordination .................................................................................... 18Working with Virtual LUN VP Mobility in VMware environments ............................... 18 Manual tiering .................................................................................................................. 20 Pinning a device in FAST/FAST VP ................................................................................. 22 Changing disk and RAID type ............................................................................................ 27FAST VP and Oracle Applications 12 ...................................................................... 33 Applications Architecture ................................................................................................. 33 Working with FAST VP and Oracle Applications on VMware infrastructure ......................... 34 Oracle Applications Tablespace Model ............................................................................. 35 Oracle Applications implementation................................................................................. 36 Use case implementation ................................................................................................. 37 Static tablespace placement ............................................................................................ 39 Oracle Application deployment ........................................................................................ 39 Hardware layout ............................................................................................................... 40FAST VP configuration ............................................................................................ 40 Configuring FAST VP ..................................................................................................... 44Oracle Applications case study using FAST VP performance monitoring ................... 56 Order Entry application ..................................................................................................... 59 FAST VP Results ................................................................................................................ 64 FAST VP, manual tiering, and real-world considerations.................................................... 66 Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 3 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  4. 4. Conclusion ............................................................................................................ 67References ............................................................................................................ 68 Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 4 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  5. 5. List of FiguresFigure 1. Version 1.1 of Unisphere for VMAX .......................................................................................... 10Figure 2. VSI 5.3 features ....................................................................................................................... 11Figure 3. VSI 5.3 Storage Viewer feature................................................................................................. 12Figure 4. Thin devices and thin pools containing data devices ............................................................... 13Figure 5. FAST managed objects ............................................................................................................ 16Figure 6. FAST VP components ............................................................................................................... 17Figure 7. Thin LUN distribution across pools viewed through SYMCLI ..................................................... 20Figure 8. Thin LUN distribution across pools viewed through Unisphere ................................................. 21Figure 9. Thin LUN displayed in VSI ........................................................................................................ 21Figure 10. Pinning a device in Unisphere................................................................................................ 23Figure 11. Pinning a device through SYMCLI ........................................................................................... 24Figure 12. Validating the migration ........................................................................................................ 25Figure 13. Executing the migration ......................................................................................................... 25Figure 14. Completing and terminating the migration ............................................................................. 26Figure 15. The thin LUN reallocated to a single pool ............................................................................... 27Figure 16. The reallocated LUN in Unisphere .......................................................................................... 27Figure 17. Thin LUN 26B in a RAID 6 configuration .................................................................................. 28Figure 18. Thin LUN 26B located in a SATA pool ..................................................................................... 29Figure 19. FC_Pool thin pool containing the Fibre Channel disk .............................................................. 30Figure 20. Validate the migration ........................................................................................................... 30Figure 21. Query the migration session .................................................................................................. 31Figure 22. Verify and terminate the migration ......................................................................................... 31Figure 23. Thin LUN 26B located in the FC pool ...................................................................................... 32Figure 24. Thin LUN 26B in a RAID 1 configuration .................................................................................. 33Figure 25. Oracle Applications architecture ............................................................................................ 34Figure 26. Promotion of the application from SATA to FC and EFD over time ............................................ 38Figure 27. Physical/virtual environment diagram ................................................................................... 40Figure 28. Enabling FAST VP using EMC Unisphere for VMAX .................................................................. 41Figure 29. Determining the state of the FAST VP engine using SYMCLI .................................................... 42Figure 30. Diskgroup summary .............................................................................................................. 42Figure 31. Thin pools on the Symmetrix VMAX........................................................................................ 43Figure 32. Storage tier listing ................................................................................................................. 44Figure 33. Creating a storage tier in Unisphere ....................................................................................... 45Figure 34. Storage group for FAST VP in EMC Unisphere ......................................................................... 46Figure 35. Storage group for FAST VP as viewed from VMware ESXi using EMC VSI .................................. 46Figure 36. Creation of a FAST VP policy through CLI ................................................................................ 47Figure 37. Listing the FAST VP policy in CLI ............................................................................................. 48Figure 38. Creating a FAST VP policy in Unisphere .................................................................................. 49Figure 39. Associating a storage group to a FAST VP policy in CLI............................................................ 50Figure 40. Associating a storage group to a FAST policy in Unisphere ..................................................... 51Figure 41. FAST VP policy association with demand detail ...................................................................... 52Figure 42. FAST VP policy management .................................................................................................. 53 Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 5 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  6. 6. Figure 43. FAST VP general settings in Unisphere ................................................................................... 54Figure 44. Setting FAST VP performance and movement time windows ................................................... 55Figure 45. Using symvm to translate Linux database mounts on the FASTDB VM .................................... 57Figure 46. Virtual disk mapping in the EMC VSI Storage Viewer feature .................................................. 58Figure 47. Thin device bound to the pool containing SATA drives ........................................................... 59Figure 48. Total size of the Order Entry application ................................................................................. 60Figure 49. Order Entry benchmark .......................................................................................................... 61Figure 50. FAST VP move mode .............................................................................................................. 62Figure 51. Initial track movement for the database thin device ............................................................... 63Figure 52. Completed track movement for the database thin device ....................................................... 63Figure 53. FAST policy demand usage ................................................................................................... 64Figure 54. Mid-run of the Order Entry benchmark ................................................................................... 65Figure 55. Transaction response time comparing pre-FAST VP and post-FAST VP movement ................... 66 Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 6 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  7. 7. Executive summary Unlike storage arrays of the past, today’s enterprise-class storage arrays contain multiple drive types and protection methodologies. This gives the storage administrator, server administrator, and application administrator the challenge of selecting the correct storage configuration, or storage class, for each application being deployed. The trend toward virtualizing the entire environment to optimize IT infrastructures often exacerbates the problem by consolidating multiple disparate applications on a small number of large devices. Given this challenge, it is not uncommon that a single storage type (such as Fibre Channel drives) best suited for the most demanding application, is selected for all virtual machine deployments, effectively assigning all applications, regardless of their performance requirements, to the same tier. This traditional approach is wasteful since all applications and data are not equally performance-critical to the business. Furthermore, within applications themselves, particularly those reliant upon databases, there is also the opportunity to further diversify the storage make-up. Making use of high-density low-cost SATA drives for the less active applications or data, FC drives for the medium active, and Enterprise Flash Drives for the very active, allows for efficient use of storage resources, reducing the overall cost and the number of drives necessary for the virtual infrastructure. This in turn also helps to reduce energy requirements and floor space, which are both cost-saving items to the business. To achieve this “tiered” storage approach in a proactive way for VMware environments it is possible to use Symmetrix® Enhanced Virtual LUN Technology to move devices between drive types and RAID protections seamlessly inside the storage array. Symmetrix Virtual LUN technology is nondisruptive to application and nondisruptive and transparent to the user. It preserves the devices’ identity and therefore there is no need to change anything in the virtual infrastructure, from VMware® ESX® hosts to virtual machines. Canonical names, file system mount points, volume manager settings, and even scripts do not need to be altered. It also preserves any TimeFinder® or Symmetrix Remote Data Facility (SRDF®) business continuity aspects even as the data migration takes place. In a very similar way, this approach to storage tiering can be automated using Fully Automated Storage Tiering, or FAST. FAST is available for thick devices as FAST DP (Disk Provisioning) and thin devices as FAST VP (Virtual Provisioning). 1 FAST and FAST VP both use policies to manage sets of devices and the allocation of their data on available storage tiers. Based on the policy guidance and the actual workload profile over time, the FAST controller will recommend or execute automatically the movement of the managed devices between the storage tiers, even at the sub-LUN level. This white paper describes a tiered storage architecture for an application running on VMware virtual machines in a VMware virtual infrastructure, and how volumes on that1 Typically the term FAST is substituted for FAST DP. In addition, the engine and controller of the technology is frequentlypreceded by the term FAST only, though it also applies to FAST VP. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 7 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  8. 8. storage can be moved around nondisruptively using FAST VP technology, resulting inthe right data on the right storage tier at the right time.AudienceThis white paper is intended for VMware administrators, server administrators, andstorage administrators responsible for creating, managing, and using VMFSdatastores and RDMs, as well as their underlying storage devices, for their VMwarevSphere™ environments attached to a Symmetrix VMAX™ storage array runningEnginuity™ 5876. The white paper assumes the reader is familiar with Oracledatabases and applications, VMware environments, EMC Symmetrix, and the relatedsoftware.TerminologyTerm DefinitionDevice LUN, logical volumeVolume LUN, logical volumeSymmwin Disk Group A collection of physical disks that have the same physical characteristicsUnisphere Unisphere for VMAXSYMCLI/CLI Solutions Enablers Command Line InterfaceMetavolume A collection of Symmetrix devices that represent one device at the host levelAcronym/Abbreviation DefinitionLUN Logical Unit NumberVLUN Virtual LUNTDEV Symmetrix Thin DeviceFAST VP Fully Automated Storage Tiering with Virtual PoolsSG Storage GroupRDM Raw Device MappingVMFS VMware Virtual Machine File SystemSymmetrix VMAX using Enginuity 5876Enginuity 5876 carries the extended and systematic feature development forwardfrom previous Symmetrix generations. This means all of the reliability, availability,and serviceability features, all of the interoperability and host operating systemscoverage, and all of the application software capabilities developed by EMC and itspartners continue to perform productively and seamlessly even as underlyingtechnology is refreshed. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 8 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  9. 9. EMC Unisphere for VMAXBeginning with Enginuity 5876, Symmetrix Management Console has beentransformed into EMC® Unisphere™ for VMAX™ (hitherto known simply asUnisphere) which offers big-button navigation and streamlined operations to simplifyand reduce the time required to manage a data center. Unisphere for VMAX simplifiesstorage management under a common framework, incorporating SymmetrixPerformance Analyzer which previously required a separate interface. You can useUnisphere to:• Manage user accounts and roles• Perform configuration operations (create volumes, mask volumes, set• Symmetrix attributes, set volume attributes, set port flags, and create SAVE volume pools)• Manage volumes (change volume configuration, set volume status, and create/dissolve meta volumes)• Manage Fully Automated Storage Tiering (FAST™, FAST VP)• Perform and monitor replication operations (TimeFinder®/Snap, TimeFinder/VP Snap, TimeFinder/Clone, Symmetrix Remote Data Facility (SRDF®), Open Replicator for Symmetrix (ORS))• Manage advanced Symmetrix features, such as: o Fully Automated Storage Tiering (FAST) o Fully Automated Storage Tiering for virtual pools (FAST VP) o Enhanced Virtual LUN Technology o Auto-provisioning Groups o Virtual Provisioning o Federated Live Migration o Federated Tiered Storage (FTS)• Monitor alertsIn addition, with the Performance monitoring option, Unisphere for VMAX providestools for performing analysis and historical trending of Symmetrix systemperformance data. You can use the performance option to:• Monitor performance and capacity over time• Drill-down through data to investigate issues• View graphs detailing system performance• Set performance thresholds and alerts• View high frequency metrics in real time Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 9 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  10. 10. • Perform root cause analysis• View Symmetrix system heat maps• Execute scheduled and ongoing reports (queries), and export that data to a file• Utilize predefined dashboards for many of the system components• Customize your own dashboard templatesThe new GUI interface dashboard is presented in Figure 1.Figure 1. Version 1.1 of Unisphere for VMAXUnisphere for VMAX, shown in the preceding figure, can be run on a number ofdifferent kinds of open systems hosts, physical or virtual. Unisphere for VMAX is alsoavailable as a virtual appliance for ESX version 4.0 (and later) in the VMwareinfrastructure. For more details please visit Powerlink® at http://Powerlink.EMC.com.EMC Virtual Storage IntegratorEMC Virtual Storage Integrator (VSI) for vSphere Client version 5.x provides multiplefeature sets including: Storage Viewer (SV), Path Management, Unified Storage Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 10 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  11. 11. Management, and SRDF SRA Utilities. Storage Viewer functionality extends theVMware vSphere Client to facilitate the discovery and identification of EMCSymmetrix, VPLEX™, CLARiiON®, Isilon®, VNX® and Celerra® storage devices that areallocated to VMware ESX/ESXi™ hosts and virtual machines. Unified StorageManagement simplifies the provisioning of Symmetrix VMAX virtual pooled storagefor data centers, ESX servers, clusters, and resource pools. Path Management allowsthe user to control how datastores are accessed, while the SRA Utilities provide aframework for working with the SRDF SRA adapter in VMware vCenter Site RecoveryManager environments. These features are shown installed in Figure 2.Figure 2. VSI 5.3 featuresVSI for vSphere Client presents the underlying storage details to the virtual datacenteradministrator, merging the data of several different storage mapping tools into a few,seamless vSphere Client views. VSI enables you to resolve the underlying storage ofVirtual Machine File System (VMFS) and Network File System (NFS) datastores andvirtual disks, as well as raw device mappings (RDM). In addition, you are presentedwith lists of storage arrays and devices that are accessible to the ESX(i) hosts in thevirtual datacenter.One of these features, the Storage Viewer, is displayed in Figure 3 and isdemonstrating how to obtain detailed information about a LUN. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 11 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  12. 12. Figure 3. VSI 5.3 Storage Viewer featureOracle ApplicationsOracle Applications is a tightly integrated family of Financial, ERP, CRM, andmanufacturing application products that share a common look and feel. Using themenus and windows of Oracle Applications, users have access to all the functionsthey need to manage their business information. Oracle Applications is highlyresponsive to users, supporting a multi-window GUI that provides users with fullpoint-and-click capability. In addition, Oracle Applications offers many other featuressuch as field-to-field validation and a list of values to help users simplify data entryand maintain the integrity of the data they enter.SwingBenchSwingBench© is a GUI tool developed in Java by Dominic Giles of the Oracle DatabaseSolutions Group. The tool is designed to generate a simulated multi-user workloadand provide a graphical indication of system throughput and response times.Benchmarks provide a good substitute for what otherwise would be a daunting taskof gathering hundreds of applications users and training them to perform a pre-configured set of tasks. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 12 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  13. 13. There are four benchmarks included with SwingBench: Order Entry (jdbc), Order Entry(PL/SQL), Calling Circle, and a set of PL/SQL stubs that allow users to create their ownbenchmark.Symmetrix Virtual ProvisioningSymmetrix Virtual Provisioning™, starting in Enginuity 5773, introduced a new type ofhost-accessible device called a thin device that can be used in many of the sameways that regular, host-accessible Symmetrix devices have traditionally been used.Unlike regular Symmetrix devices, thin devices do not need to have physical storagecompletely allocated at the time the devices are created and presented to a host. Thephysical storage that is used to supply drive space for a thin device comes from ashared thin pool that has been associated with the thin device. A thin pool iscomprised of internal Symmetrix devices called data devices that are dedicated to thepurpose of providing the actual physical storage used by thin devices. When they arefirst created, thin devices are not associated with any particular thin pool. Anoperation referred to as “binding” must be performed to associate a thin device witha thin pool.Figure 4 depicts the relationships between thin devices and their associated thinpools. There are nine devices associated with thin Pool A and three thin devicesassociated with thin pool B.Figure 4. Thin devices and thin pools containing data devices Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 13 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  14. 14. When a write is performed to a portion of the thin device, the Symmetrix allocates aminimum allotment of physical storage from the pool and maps that storage to aregion of the thin device including the area targeted by the write. The storageallocation operations are performed in small units of storage called a “thin extent.” Around-robin mechanism is used to balance the allocation of thin extents across all ofthe data devices in the pool that are enabled and that have remaining unusedcapacity. A thin extent size is comprised of twelve 64 KB tracks (768 KB). That meansthat the initial bind of a thin device to a pool causes one extent, or 12 tracks, to beallocated per thin device.When a read is performed on a thin device, the data being read is retrieved from theappropriate data device in the storage pool to which the thin device is bound. Readsdirected to an area of a thin device that has not been mapped do not triggerallocation operations. The result of reading an unmapped block is that a block inwhich each byte is equal to zero will be returned. When more storage is required toservice existing or future thin devices, data devices can be added to existing thinpools. New thin devices can also be created and associated with existing thin pools.Prior to Enginuity 5875, a thin device could only be bound to, and have extentsallocated in, a single thin pool. This thin pool can, in turn, only contain Symmetrixdata devices of a single RAID protection type, and a single drive technology (andsingle rotation speed in the case of FC and SATA drives). Starting with Enginuity5875, a thin device will still only be considered bound to a single thin pool but mayhave extents allocated in multiple pools within a single Symmetrix. A thin device mayalso be moved to a different thin pool, without any loss of data or data access, byusing Virtual LUN VP Mobility. Virtual LUN VP Mobility provides the ability to migrate athin device from one thin pool to another. If the LUN to move is part of a FAST VPPolicy, it may only be moved to one of the thin pools in the policy.Federated Tiered Storage (FTS): OverviewIntroduced with Enginuity 5876, Federated Tiered Storage (FTS) allows LUNs that existon external arrays to be used to provide physical storage for Symmetrix VMAX arrays.The external LUNs can be used as raw storage space for the creation of Symmetrixdevices in the same way internal Symmetrix physical drives are used. These devicesare referred to as eDisks. Data on the external LUNs can also be preserved andaccessed through Symmetrix devices. This allows the use of Symmetrix Enginuityfunctionality, such as local replication, remote replication, storage tiering, datamanagement, and data migration with data that resides on external arrays. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 14 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  15. 15. Fully Automated Storage Tiering (FAST) Fully Automated Storage Tiering (FAST) automates the identification of data volumes for the purposes of relocating application data across different performance/capacity tiers within an array, or to an external array using Federated Tiered Storage (FTS). 2 The primary benefits of FAST include: • Elimination of manually tiering applications when performance objectives change over time • Automating the process of identifying data that can benefit from Enterprise Flash Drives or that can be kept on higher-capacity, less-expensive SATA drives without impacting performance • Improving application performance at the same cost, or providing the same application performance at lower cost. Cost is defined as acquisition (both hardware and software), space/energy, and management expense • Optimizing and prioritizing business applications, allowing customers to dynamically allocate resources within a single array • Delivering greater flexibility in meeting different price/performance ratios throughout the lifecycle of the information stored FAST and Fully Automated Storage Tiering with Virtual Pools (FAST VP) EMC Symmetrix FAST (FAST DP) and FAST VP automate the identification of data volumes for the purposes of relocating application data across different performance/capacity tiers within an array. FAST operates on standard Symmetrix devices. Data movements executed between tiers are performed at the full volume level. FAST VP operates on virtual devices. As such, data movement execution can be performed at the sub-LUN level, and a single thin device may have extents allocated across multiple thin pools within the array. Because FAST DP and FAST VP support different device types – standard and virtual respectively – they both can operate simultaneously within a single array. 3 Aside from some shared configuration parameters, the management and operation of each are separate. FAST managed objects There are three main elements related to the use of both FAST and FAST VP on Symmetrix VMAX, graphically depicted in Figure 5. These are: • Storage tier — A shared resource with common technologies2 Other than the brief overview provided, Federated Tiered Storage will not be addressed in this particular whitepaper. Formore information on FTS, refer to the Design and Implementation Best Practices for EMC Symmetrix Federated Tiered Storage(FTS) technical note available at http://Powerlink.EMC.com.3 This holds true for all the Symmetrix family except the VMAXe/VMAX 10K which only supports FAST VP, being a completelythin-provisioned array. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 15 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  16. 16. • FAST policy — Manages a set of tier usage rules that provide guidelines for data placement and movement across Symmetrix tiers to achieve service levels and for one or more storage groups• Storage group — A logical grouping of devices for common managementFigure 5. FAST managed objectsEach of the three managed objects can be created and managed by using eitherUnisphere for VMAX (Unisphere) or the Solutions Enabler Command Line Interface(SYMCLI).FAST VP componentsThere are two components of FAST VP – the FAST controller and the Symmetrixmicrocode or Enginuity.The FAST controller is a service that runs on the Symmetrix VMAX service processor.The Symmetrix microcode is a part of the Enginuity operating environment thatcontrols components within the array. When FAST VP is active, both componentsparticipate in the execution of two algorithms – the intelligent tiering algorithm andthe allocation compliance algorithm – to determine appropriate data placement.The intelligent tiering algorithm uses performance data collected by the microcode, aswell as supporting calculations performed by the FAST controller, to issue datamovement requests to the Virtual LUN (VLUN) VP data movement engine.The allocation compliance algorithm enforces the upper limits of storage capacity thatcan be used in each tier by a given storage group by also issuing data movementrequests to the Virtual LUN (VLUN) VP data movement engine to satisfy the capacitycompliance.Performance time windows can be defined to specify when the FAST controller shouldcollect performance data, upon which analysis is performed to determine theappropriate tier for devices. By default, this will occur 24 hours a day. Defined datamovement windows determine when to execute the data movements necessary tomove data between tiers. Data movements performed by the microcode are achievedby moving allocated extents between tiers. The size of data movement can be assmall as 768 KB, representing a single allocated thin device extent, but more typicallywill be an entire extent group, which is 7,680 KB in size (10 thin extents). Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 16 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  17. 17. FAST VP has two modes of operation, Automatic or Off. When operating in Automaticmode, data analysis and data movements will occur continuously during the defineddata movement windows. In Off mode, performance statistics will continue to becollected, but no data analysis or data movements will take place.Figure 6 shows the FAST controller operation.Figure 6. FAST VP componentsNote: For more information on FAST VP specifically please see the technical note FASTVP for EMC Symmetrix VMAX Theory and Best Practices for Planning and Performanceavailable at http://Powerlink.EMC.com.FAST VP allocation by FAST PolicyA new feature for FAST VP in 5876 is the ability for a device to allocate new extentsfrom any thin pool participating in the FAST VP Policy. When this feature is enabled,FAST VP will attempt to allocate new extents in the most appropriate tier, based uponperformance metrics. If those performance metrics are unavailable it will default toallocating in the pool to which the device is bound. If, however, the chosen pool is Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 17 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  18. 18. full, regardless of performance metrics, then FAST VP will allocate from one of theother thin pools in the policy. As long as there is space available in one of the thinpools, new extent allocations will be successful.This new feature is enabled at the Symmetrix array level and applies to all devicesmanaged by FAST VP. The feature cannot, therefore, be applied to some FAST VPpolicies and not others. By default it is disabled and any new allocations will comefrom the pool to which the device is bound.A pinned device is not considered to have performance metrics available andtherefore new allocations will be done in the pool to which the device is bound.FAST VP SRDF coordinationThe use of FAST VP with SRDF devices is fully supported; however FAST VP operateswithin a single array, and therefore will only impact the RDF devices on that array.Previously there was no coordination of the data movement between RDF pairs. Eachdevices extents would move according to the manner in which they were accessed onthat array, source or target.For instance, an R1 device will typically be subject to a read/write workload, while theR2 will only experience the writes that are propagated across the link from the R1.Because the reads to the R1 are not propagated to the R2, FAST VP on the R2 side willmake its decisions based solely on the writes and therefore the R2 data will likely notbe moved to the same tiers, in the same amounts, as on the R1.To rectify this problem, EMC introduced FAST VP SRDF coordination in 5876. FAST VPSRDF coordination allows the R1 performance metrics to be transmitted across thelink and used by the FAST VP engine on the R2 array to make promotion and demotiondecisions.FAST VP SRDF coordination is enabled or disabled at the storage group that isassociated with the FAST VP policy. The default state is disabled.FAST VP SRDF coordination is supported for single and concurrent SRDF pairings (R1and R11 devices) in any mode of operation: Synchronous, asynchronous, or adaptivecopy. FAST VP SRDF coordination is not supported for SRDF/Star, SRDF/EDP, orCascaded SRDF including R21 and R22 devices.Working with Virtual LUN VP Mobility in VMware environmentsSymmetrix Virtual LUN technology enables the seamless movement of volumes withina Symmetrix without disrupting the hosts, application, or replication sessions. Priorversions permitted the relocation of fully provisioned (thick) FBA and CKD devicesacross drive types (capacity or rotational speed) and RAID protection types. VLUN VPprovides “thin-to-thin” mobility, enabling users to meet tiered storage requirementsby migrating thin FBA LUNs between virtual pools in the same array. Virtual LUN VPMobility gives administrators the option to “re-tier” a thin volume or set of thin Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 18 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  19. 19. volumes by moving them between thin pools in a given FAST or FAST VPconfiguration. This manual “override” option helps FAST/FAST VP users respondrapidly to changing performance requirements or unexpected events.Virtual LUN VP (VLUN) migrations are session-based – each session may containmultiple devices to be migrated at the same time. There may also be multipleconcurrent migration sessions. At the time of execution of a migration, a migrationsession name is specified. This session name is subsequently used for monitoringand managing the migration.While an entire thin device will be specified for migration, only thin device extentsthat are allocated will be relocated. Thin device extents that have been allocated, butnot written to (for example, pre-allocated tracks), will be relocated but will not causeany actual data to be copied. New extent allocations that occur as a result of a hostwrite to the thin device during the migration will be satisfied from the migration targetpool.When using VLUN VP mobility with FAST VP, the destination pool must be part of theFAST VP policy. While a VLUN migration is active, FAST VP will not attempt to makeany changes. Once the migration is complete, however, all the tracks will beavailable for re-tiering. To prevent movements post-migration, the relocated device(s)can be pinned.The advances in VLUN enable customers to move Symmetrix thin devices from onethin pool to another thin pool on the same Symmetrix without disrupting userapplications and with minimal impact to host I/O. Users may move thin devicesbetween thin pools to:• Change the disk media on which the thin devices are stored• Change the thin device underlying RAID protection level• Consolidate a thin device that was managed by FAST VP to a single thin pool• Move all extents from a thin device that are in one thin pool to another thin poolBeginning with 5876, VLUN VP Mobility users have the option to move only part of thethin device from one source pool to one destination pool. This feature could be veryuseful, for instance, in an environment where a subset of financial data is heavilyaccessed each month for reporting purposes. If all that financial data is stored on aparticular LUN under FAST VP control, over the course of the month the data will mostlikely be re-tiered up to EFD due to access patterns. Once the month’s reporting iscomplete, however, that data is now aged, and the next month’s data is paramount.Rather than wait for FAST VP to down-tier the data, through the up-tiering of the newmonth’s data, the user can simply move all tracks from that LUN from EFD down to FCor SATA, freeing up all the EFD space for promotion of this month’s data.In a VMware environment, a customer may have any number of use cases for VLUN.For instance, if a customer elects to not use FAST VP, manual tiering is achievablethrough VLUN. A heavily used datastore residing on SATA drives may require theability to provide improved performance. That thin device underlying the datastore Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 19 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  20. 20. could be manually moved to FC or EFD. Conversely a datastore residing on FC thathouses data needing to be archived could be moved to a SATA device which,although a less-performing disk tier, has a much smaller cost per GB.In a FAST VP environment, customers may wish to circumvent the automatic processin cases where they know all the data on a thin device has changed its function.Take, for instance, the previous example of archiving. A datastore that containsinformation that has now been designated as archive could be removed from FAST VPcontrol then migrated over to the thin pool that is comprised of the disk technologymost suited for archived data, SATA.Following are two examples of using VLUN in a VMware environment:• Manual tiering• Changing disk and RAID typeManual tieringHere are two screenshots, Figure 7 contains the SYMCLI(CLI) and Figure 8 shows theUnisphere GUI, showing the distribution of a thin device or TDEV, across threedifferent thin pools representing three different disk technologies, captured atdifferent times in the track movement.Figure 7. Thin LUN distribution across pools viewed through SYMCLI Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 20 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  21. 21. Figure 8. Thin LUN distribution across pools viewed through UnisphereThis TDEV is currently under FAST VP control and is presented to an ESXi cluster (Figure 9).Figure 9. Thin LUN displayed in VSIIt has been determined that the data on this TDEV needs to be archived, and thereforethe desire is to have all of it placed on SATA technology both because theperformance requirements match that disk type and also to reduce the cost to thebusiness for keeping this data. Because of the archiving requirement, it will not benecessary to have this TDEV under FAST VP control going forward; however thebusiness cannot be certain that future developments may change the requirements ofthe data on the disk. Also, removing this TDEV from FAST VP control will require thepolicy associated with this storage group to be removed. So rather than remove the Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 21 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  22. 22. existing FAST VP policy, the user can prevent the FAST engine from looking at thedevice’s statistics and making changes by a simple process known as “pinning.” Sobefore beginning the VLUN migration of the data back to the SATA pool, the deviceshould be pinned.Pinning a device in FAST/FAST VPPinning a device can be done in Unisphere or through the CLI. In Unisphere, shown inFigure 10, one navigates through the array/storage/volumes path. The user thenhighlights the device and clicks the double-arrow icon on the bottom menu. From thepop-up menu, the user selects “Pin”. By pinning the device there is no concern thatonce the migration completes, the FAST engine will recommence movement of theextent groups belonging to that device. Note that even if a device is not pinned priorto migration, the FAST engine will not attempt any movements while the device isunder migration; however if it is not pinned, data movements may begin againimmediately following termination of the migration session. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 22 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  23. 23. Figure 10. Pinning a device in Unisphere Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 23 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  24. 24. For the CLI, use symdev to pin the device as in Figure 11:Figure 11. Pinning a device through SYMCLIOnce the device is pinned, the migration can begin. VLUN migrations, just like thickLUN migrations, use the SYMCLI command, symmigrate. For thin device migrationa target pool needs to be supplied. Start by first validating the migration. Althoughthis is an optional step, it is recommended to ensure the task is permitted. Create atext file that contains the device(s) that are to be migrated back to the single pool.For this migration the thin pool is named SATA_Pool. Note that even though thisexample is moving data for device 17B back to the pool to which it is bound, it is Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 24 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  25. 25. possible to move the device to a different pool and symmigrate will bind the deviceto that pool, completely transparent to the hosts accessing the device. Recall,however, if that device is under FAST VP control, only a thin pool in the policy can bethe migration target pool. The contents of the text file used to perform the migrationare shown in Figure 12. The figure also shows the SYMCLI command to validate theproposed migration.Figure 12. Validating the migrationOnce validated, the migration can start as shown in Figure 13. Once the migration isin process, the session can be queried, which is also shown.Figure 13. Executing the migration Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 25 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  26. 26. Once the migration is complete the status will change from “SyncInProg” to“Migrated”. When it is in the migrated state, the session needs to be terminated andthus end the VLUN migration as seen in Figure 14.Figure 14. Completing and terminating the migrationViewing the TDEV now with SYMCLI in Figure 15 or with Unisphere in Figure 16, onesees that all data is returned to the SATA_Pool thin pool. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 26 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  27. 27. Figure 15. The thin LUN reallocated to a single poolFigure 16. The reallocated LUN in UnisphereChanging disk and RAID typeThis example will show how a TDEV can be moved from one type of disk technologyand RAID configuration to another disk technology and RAID configuration. One Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 27 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  28. 28. reason a customer might perform this type of migration is for a device not under FASTVP control and when business requirements require a change in performancecharacteristics for the application(s) residing on the device. In this example themigration will change the tier of the TDEV from a SATA RAID 6 thin pool to an FC RAID1 thin pool. Figure 17 and Figure 18 show the device, 26B, as residing on SATA diskin a RAID 6 configuration, bound to thin pool SATA_Pool.Figure 17. Thin LUN 26B in a RAID 6 configuration Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 28 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  29. 29. Figure 18. Thin LUN 26B located in a SATA poolThe TDEV now will be migrated from thin pool SATA_Pool to FC_Pool, which is on FCtechnology as seen in Figure 19. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 29 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  30. 30. Figure 19. FC_Pool thin pool containing the Fibre Channel diskFirst, the device for the migration is validated as seen in Figure 20.Figure 20. Validate the migrationOnce the validation completes successfully, the migration can follow and the processcan be queried for status as demonstrated in Figure 21. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 30 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  31. 31. Figure 21. Query the migration sessionIn this case, with the device having only part of its 100 GB allocated, the migrationcompletes quickly. If there is any question as to whether the session is complete, runthe SYMCLI command verify first to show the session is migrated, then aterminate as in Figure 22.Figure 22. Verify and terminate the migration Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 31 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  32. 32. Recall that all this migration activity has been transparent to the user andnondisruptive to the application. If one now views the configuration of device 26B inUnisphere, as highlighted in Figure 23, it shows that it indeed has changed RAIDconfiguration and disk technology.Figure 23. Thin LUN 26B located in the FC poolBy running a refresh in EMC’s Virtual Storage Integrator as in Figure 24, one can seethat the thin device reflects the new configuration. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 32 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  33. 33. Figure 24. Thin LUN 26B in a RAID 1 configurationFAST VP and Oracle Applications 12Applications ArchitectureThe Oracle Applications Architecture is a framework for multi-tiered, distributedcomputing that supports Oracle Applications products. In this model, various serversor services are distributed among three levels, or tiers.A tier is a logical grouping of services, potentially spread across more than onephysical or virtual machine. The three-tier architecture that comprises an Oracle E-Business Suite installation is made up of the database tier, which supports andmanages the Oracle database; the application tier, which supports and manages thevarious Applications components, and is sometimes known as the middle tier; andthe desktop tier, which provides the user interface through an add-on component to astandard web browser.The simplest architecture for Oracle Applications is to have all tiers, except thedesktop tier, installed on a single server. This configuration might be acceptable in adevelopment environment, but for production environments scaling would quickly Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 33 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  34. 34. become an issue. In order to mimic a more realistic production environment,therefore, the architecture of the FAST VP testing environment is built with a separatephysical application tier and database tier as shown in Figure 25. A third desktoptier houses the SwingBench application, representing the users accessing thesystem.Figure 25. Oracle Applications architectureWorking with FAST VP and Oracle Applications on VMware infrastructureAs already mentioned, because of the diversity of Oracle Applications, in that thereare hundreds of different modules within a single product, deploying themappropriately on the right tier of storage is a daunting task. Implementing them in aVMware environment that utilizes FAST VP will demonstrate how a customer canachieve proper performance and cost savings at the same time. For this study, thelatest Oracle Applications release 12 was installed and configured. There are a fewbenefits to using the latest release. First, Oracle pre-packages release 12 withversion 11g of the Oracle database. Version 11g is Oracle’s latest database release Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 34 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  35. 35. and represents a significant advancement over 10g in performance and functionality. Second, Oracle has now divorced itself from the practice of having two tablespaces, and hence at least two datafiles, per application. Prior to release 12, each Applications module had its own set of tablespaces and datafiles, one for the data and one for the index. With over 200 schemas, managing a database of over 400 tablespaces and datafiles was, and is, a sizable undertaking. The new approach that Oracle uses in release 12 is called the Oracle Applications Tablespace Model, or OATM. Oracle Applications Tablespace Model Oracle Applications release 12 utilizes as the standard a modern infrastructure for tablespace management, the Oracle Applications Tablespace Model (OATM). The OATM is similar to the traditional model in retaining the system, undo, and temporary tablespaces. The key difference is that Applications products in an OATM environment share a much smaller number of tablespaces, rather than having their own dedicated tablespaces. Applications schema objects are allocated to the shared tablespaces based on two main factors: the type of data they contain, and I/O characteristics such as size, life span, access methods, and locking granularity. For example, tables that contain seed data are allocated to a different tablespace from the tables that contain transactional data. In addition, while most indexes are held in the same tablespace as the base table, indexes on transaction tables are held in a single tablespace dedicated to such indexes. The OATM provides a variety of benefits, summarized in the list below and discussed in more detail later: • Simplifies maintenance and recovery by using far fewer tablespaces than the older model • Makes best use of the restricted number of raw devices available in Oracle Real Applications Cluster (Oracle RAC) and other environments, where every tablespace requires its own raw device • Utilizes locally managed tablespaces, enabling more precise control over unused space and hence reducing fragmentation • Takes advantage of automatic segment space management, eliminating the need for manual space management tasks • Increases block-packing compared to the older model, reducing the overall number of buffer gets and improving runtime performance • Maximizes usefulness of wide disk stripe configurations The OATM uses locally managed tablespaces, which enables extent 4 sizes either to be determined automatically (autoallocate), or for all extents to be made the same,4 An extent is a set of contiguous blocks allocated in the database (in this case the datafile associated with the tablespace). Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 35 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  36. 36. user-specified size (uniform). This choice of extent management types means thatlocally managed tablespaces offer greater flexibility than the dictionary-managedtablespaces used in the traditional tablespace model. However, when using uniformextents with locally managed tablespaces, the extent size must be chosen with care:Too small a size can have an adverse effect on space management and performance.A further benefit of locally managed tablespaces, and hence use of OATM, is theintroduction of automatic segment space management, a simpler and more efficientway of managing space within a segment. It can require more space but eliminatesthe need for traditional manual segment space management tasks such as specifyingand tuning schema object storage parameters such as PCTUSED. This and relatedstorage parameters are only used to determine space allocation for objects indictionary-managed tablespaces, and have no meaning in the context of locallymanaged tablespaces.Oracle Applications implementationA customer implementation of Oracle Applications is not a quick process. Theinstallation itself is only the first part of what can be an endeavor lasting manymonths or longer. Although there are almost 200 application modules in the OracleApplications, customers rarely, if ever, use all of them. They use a selection of them,or perhaps a bundle such as Financials, or CRM. These modules are thenimplemented (typically) in a phased approach. The transition from an existingapplications system or implementation of a new system takes time. How that systemeventually will be used, and more importantly how that database will be accessed,presents a real challenge for the system administrator and database administrator.These individuals are tasked with providing the right performance for the rightapplication at the right price. In other words, both performance optimization and costoptimization are extremely important to them; however, obtaining the balancebetween the two is not an easy task. The three disk technologies covered in thispaper — SATA, FC, and EFD — have differing performance characteristics and verydifferent costs. For instance, how will they decide what part of the database belongson the various disk technologies that represent the cost and performance balancingact they attempt each day? This is made even more difficult under the new OracleApplications Tablespace Model. Oracle’s new model certainly does a good job athigh-level database object consolidation – less tablespaces and less datafiles – butsince the application modules are no longer separated into individual tablespacesand datafiles, there really is no practical way to put different modules on differenttiers of storage – until now. FAST VP is the perfect complement to the manner inwhich Oracle implements the database in release 12 of the Oracle application suite.In fact, the entire database of user data can be placed on a single mount point on aVMware virtual disk and yet still be spread over the appropriate disk technologiesthat match the business requirements. The simplicity of this deployment model isenabled by FAST VP. The following section presents one scenario on how this mightbe done in a production environment. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 36 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  37. 37. Use case implementationIn this example, Oracle Applications release 12 was installed using Oracle’s pre-configured and seeded sample database, the Vision database, all on a VMwareinfrastructure. Each of the two tiers in the implementation was a virtual machine. Theentire installation is known as the Vision Demo system. The Vision Demo systeminstallation includes the licensing of all of Oracle’s application modules along with adatabase that contains data for these modules. Such a system allows customers tolearn how to use Oracle Applications as well as provide a good foundation for thetype of testing documented herein. In this FAST VP use case environment, allproducts begin their storage lifecycle on an inexpensive tier, SATA. Although thesedrives are slower than Fibre Channel or Flash drives, they can easily meet theperformance needs required for the early phases of implementation. A customer mayspend many months converting data, entering financial charts of accounts, and doingother pre-production tasks. Due to the low I/O and less stringent response timerequirements during this period it is unnecessary to use a storage tier that has betterperformance characteristics than SATA. This is also a great cost-saver to a companysince SATA has a lower cost per GB than either Fibre Channel drives or EFDs.If, however, a customer was taking an existing Oracle Applications environment andmoving it under FAST VP control, they might want to start their database at a highertier of storage like Fibre Channel, to avoid any performance implications while theFAST VP engine was determining where best to place the data. Recall that FAST VPwill both promote and demote data so eventually the data will be placed on thecorrect tier of disk. The caveat, of course, is that there needs to be sufficient FibreChannel disk to support the entire database at the point FAST VP is implemented.So once the implementation phase comes to a close, and application modules arebrought live, how will FAST VP recognize the need to move the data representingthose modules from SATA to a higher-performing storage tier? Let’s take the exampleof a Financials implementation. A customer “goes live” with accounts receivable,accounts payable and general ledger. Currently these modules exist in singletablespaces spread across a few datafiles that are stored on a single Linux mountpoint, created on a virtual disk in a VMware VMFS datastore. That datastore iscreated on a single thin LUN that is bound to a pool of SATA disks. As that thin LUN isbound to a pool of SATA disks, the data in the modules is actually spread across allthose pooled disks. In a traditional storage implementation, this might seem to be animpossible task. With the data being spread across so many different disks howwould one find the most accessed data and move it to a different storage tier? Thetrue genius of FAST VP is that from the module or user perspective, there is no need toknow anything about how the application is accessed. In other words, FAST VP workswith complete user transparency. Here is how it is accomplished: On the Symmetrixthe storage administrator creates a set of tiers, each representing a different type ofdisk in the box, for example, SATA, Fibre Channel, and Flash, each able to have theirown type of RAID protection – RAID 6, RAID 1, and RAID 5 respectively. Each of thosetiers is then associated with a thin pool that contains one of the aforementioned disktypes. In this example, one of those tiers is associated with the SATA pool in which Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 37 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  38. 38. the database containing the Financial modules is located. A policy is then set up thatdictates how much space is to be made available in each tier of disk. As theproduction workload ramps up in these Financial modules, FAST VP is gatheringstatistics on how the data is being accessed in those thin pools. As I/O increasesacross the Financial modules, FAST VP is able to determine that portions of the datalocated in the SATA pool need to be up-tiered – to Fibre Channel or Flash or both.Once determined, the data is moved automatically as represented in Figure 26 – nouser intervention is required.Figure 26. Promotion of the application from SATA to FC and EFD over timeThe amount of data moved will represent only that data that is being heavily accessedwithin the application modules. So though one of these Financial applicationmodules may be many gigabytes in size as determined by the tables and indexes thatmake it up, FAST VP is only going to move the data that is being heavily accessed.Since only a portion of the data is moving, less disk space of the higher and moreexpensive tiers is being used, thus not only saving money but leaving more availablespace for other heavily accessed applications. As other applications (for example GLor other Oracle Applications modules) are brought live, they too will benefit from FASTVP. Conversely, it should not be forgotten that FAST VP will also demote. Thatfinancial data that FAST VP moved to the higher tier may be slated for archiving nextmonth. When access patterns/workloads change, FAST VP will recognize it and movethe data accordingly, in this case back to SATA. In the end the customer will benefitby having the right data placed on the right storage type at the right time and at theright cost. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 38 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  39. 39. Static tablespace placementAs Oracle Applications is powered by an Oracle database, there are a number ofdatabase objects that are in all Oracle databases: temp files, system files, undo files,and redo logs. These tablespaces and their respective datafiles are a small part ofthe database but are essential components that are accessed, in the case of the redologs, constantly. These Oracle tablespaces are not part of the Oracle ApplicationsTablespace Model. Unlike individual application modules therefore, it is possible toplace these Oracle datafiles and logfiles on different mount points and/or differentdisk technologies from the start. Thus one may, in fact, choose not to make thesepart of a FAST VP policy and instead place them on high-performing disk permanently.In general, these tablespaces and logfiles do not grow significantly in size ascompared to the user data portion of the database, nor do their performancecharacteristics change drastically over time. In addition, when using EMC’sreplication technologies, it is always best practice to separate the redo logs and temptablespaces at the very least (for details on Oracle running on EMC systems pleasesee the TechBook Oracle Databases on EMC Symmetrix Storage Systems onwww.EMC.com). Although it is possible to follow the same strategy presented hereand put all components on SATA and in a FAST VP policy, a productionimplementation will access these files frequently and thus the data would be movedto higher tiers. Given the limited amount of disk space the files occupy and therelative certainty of their access patterns, having the FAST VP engine analyze this datais unnecessary, and in fact adds overhead. The following study puts this intopractice, separating out these files, both because of the explanation above and alsoto accurately account for the sub-LUN movements of the application module.Oracle Application deploymentThe VMware environment deployed in this study consists of three ESXi 5.0 serverswith a total of four virtual machines listed in Table 1. The environment is managed bya VMware vCenter Server. Figure 27 is a visual representation of the environment.Table 1. Example environment Server Name Model OS & CPUs RAM Disk Version (GB) Database Tier fastdb VMware OEL 5 4 16 SAN VM 64-bit Applications fastapp VMware OEL 5 1 8 SAN Tier VM 64-bit Management fastmgmt VMware Win2008 1 4 SAN Server VM 64-bit Virtual Center sibu_infra_vc VMware Win2008 2 4 Local/SAN VM 64-bit EMC 000198700046 VMAX 10K 5876 43 62 TB Symmetrix microcode usable Total Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 39 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  40. 40. Hardware layoutFigure 27. Physical/virtual environment diagramFAST VP configurationThe first step to showcase the FAST VP functionality in a virtualized OracleApplications environment is to ensure that FAST VP is enabled. This can be donethrough the use of management tools for Symmetrix – Solution Enabler CLI orUnisphere. The process of enabling FAST VP using the Unisphere interface is shownin Figure 28, and the result of the change is shown in Figure 29 by utilizing theSYMCLI(CLI) interface. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 40 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  41. 41. Figure 28. Enabling FAST VP using EMC Unisphere for VMAX Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 41 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  42. 42. Figure 29. Determining the state of the FAST VP engine using SYMCLIAfter enabling the engine, there are a number of steps that follow: Creation of FASTVP tiers, storage groups, and FAST VP policies. The Unisphere application providesusers with an easy-to-understand interface to perform these activities; however, theobjects can also be created using command line (SYMCLI). Figure 30 contains a list ofthe disk groups that show the disk technologies available in Symmetrix VMAX 10K.As seen in the figure, the array has Fibre Channel, SATA, and EFD (or Flash) drives.Figure 30. Diskgroup summary Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 42 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  43. 43. In order to use FAST VP, at least two different disk technologies are required. Fromthese disks, the thin pools can be built. To demonstrate the use of FAST VP in anOracle Applications environment, three pools were built in this environment to matchthe three different disk technologies: FC_Pool, SATA_Pool, and EFD_Pool. Thedetailed procedure used for the creation of the thin pools is not included herein asthe Virtual Provisioning feature has been available since release 5773 of themicrocode. The pools are shown in Figure 31.Figure 31. Thin pools on the Symmetrix VMAXThe thin pools are backed by data devices that are configured as follows: • EFD_Pool - 64 x 15 GB RAID 5 (3+1) • FC_Pool – 200 x 30 GB RAID 1 • SATA_Pool – 200 x 50 GB RAID 6 (6+2)It is important to use enough devices to ensure that the data on the TDEVs is stripedwide, thereby avoiding hotspots.The allocation of disk space in the thin pools, however, is not simply based upon theavailable disk in VMAX. The majority of data in the Vision demo environment will notbe accessed frequently and therefore whether it starts on SATA or not, FAST VP willensure that a larger portion of it will end up there. This is one of the reasons that it isa logical decision to place the entire database on SATA from the start, and hence whythe SATA pool is the largest. This is all for the best from a cost perspective also, sinceboth FC and particularly EFD are more expensive than SATA. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 43 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  44. 44. Configuring FAST VPThe five steps to configure FAST VP are as follows:Step 1 - Create storage tiersThree storage tiers were used in the environment: one for 15k Fibre Channel, one forFlash drives, and one for 7200 SATA drives. For simplicity’s sake, they are namedFC_Tier, EFD_Tier, and SATA_Tier. The CLI command to create the EFD_Tier storage tieris shown in Figure 32.Figure 32. Storage tier listingFigure 33 is the dialog box to create storage tiers in Unisphere. The storage tierscreated for this use case are listed. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 44 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  45. 45. Figure 33. Creating a storage tier in UnisphereStep 2 – Create the storage groupThis again can be done via the CLI or Unisphere. In many customer environments astorage group already exists for mapping and masking storage to the hosts. In thisenvironment there are two storage groups that represent the Vision database, eachwith a single LUN. As can be seen in Figure 34, the storage group dsib1115_WP_sgcontains one device, 17B, which is associated with a FASTVP policy. This devicecontains all the user data. The other group dsib1115_WP2_sg contains device 183which is not part of a FAST VP policy as it is the location of temp files, system files,undo files, and redo logs from the database. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 45 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  46. 46. Figure 34. Storage group for FAST VP in EMC UnisphereA view of the storage group as seen from VMware ESXi using EMC Virtual StorageIntegrator (VSI) is displayed in Figure 35.Figure 35. Storage group for FAST VP as viewed from VMware ESXi using EMC VSI Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 46 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  47. 47. Step 3 - Create a FAST VP policyThe CLI syntax for creating the policy is included below in Figure 36. The GUI interfacefor creating the FAST VP policy can be seen in Figure 38. The policy here is set upsuch that all devices hosting the Vision database can exist on SATA (100 percent).Recall that in the environment presented in this paper, all applications start on SATA.For this to occur, the policy has to allow 100 percent of the storage to reside on SATAdrives. If this is set to a percentage of storage that is less than the size of the TDEVs inthe policy, the storage group will not be compliant with the FAST VP policy and FASTwill perform a compliance move although the performance characteristics may notwarrant such a move. The other tiers are set to 18% for FC and 3% for EFD in order tomore realistically represent a customer’s environment.Figure 36. Creation of a FAST VP policy through CLIThe policy percentages of disk technologies used in this use case speak to tworealities: first that both EFD and FC are more expensive mediums than SATA, andsecond, and more importantly, that only a small percentage of an application ordatabase is going to be accessed regularly. FAST is designed to make use of the diskprovided to it. If cost were not a concern, the best policy to institute is 100/100/100,which would allow FAST full reign to use as much of each tier as it needed.Unfortunately, in the real world cost is one of the prime concerns, and as a resultcustomers are more likely to have smaller amounts of FC and EFD in their Symmetrixthan SATA. This leaves less to dedicate to a FAST VP policy; however the good newsis that most data in applications and databases are rarely accessed so it is unlikelylarge amounts of very fast disks such as EFD will be required.The result of the policy creation is shown in Figure 37. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 47 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  48. 48. Figure 37. Listing the FAST VP policy in CLI Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 48 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  49. 49. Figure 38. Creating a FAST VP policy in Unisphere Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 49 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  50. 50. Step 4 - Associate the storage group with the new policyTo associate the storage group from Figure 36 to the newly created policy, the CLIcommand is:Figure 39. Associating a storage group to a FAST VP policy in CLIThis can also be accomplished in Unisphere as shown in Figure 40. At the point ofassociating a storage group, the user can check a box to enable RDF coordination asexplained in the section FAST VP SRDF coordination. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 50 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  51. 51. Figure 40. Associating a storage group to a FAST policy in UnisphereOne can now list the details of the association, including in what way the storagegroup complies with the policy. This is shown in Figure 41. From the output we cansee that the total amount of space that the current storage group can “demand” is400 GB, or the size of the thin device 17B, though the current allocation is only 290GB. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 51 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  52. 52. Figure 41. FAST VP policy association with demand detail Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 52 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  53. 53. Similar demand details can be obtained from the Unisphere interface as shown inFigure 42.Figure 42. FAST VP policy managementStep 5 – Configure a performance and move windowAfter the storage group is associated with the FAST VP policy, two time windows needto be setup. One window dictates when the FAST VP algorithms observe theperformance of the devices, and the other window specifies when the generatedmoves may be executed. Although this can be configured through the CLI, theUnisphere GUI interface is much easier to navigate and was utilized in this study. Thewindow setups are shown in Figure 43 and Figure 44. Because of the nature of theuse case and the limited testing windows, the “Time to Sample before First Analysis”was set to 2 hours, and the “Workload Analysis Period” to 1 week. When setting thetime for performance and movement, the local time of the machine is used; howeverall times will be converted to UTC to ensure all time windows are set as the userintended whether they are on the East Coast or West Coast. The performance andmove windows similarly were set to adhere to the testing and thus they are 24 hoursa day. In a customer environment, the performance window should be set to matchthe hours the data will be accessed, while the move window should be set to a timeperiod of less activity on the system. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 53 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  54. 54. Figure 43. FAST VP general settings in Unisphere Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 54 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  55. 55. Figure 44. Setting FAST VP performance and movement time windowsWith the general FAST VP environment configured, the testing can proceed. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 55 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  56. 56. Oracle Applications case study using FAST VP performancemonitoringFor the purposes of this example, the following assumptions were made about theOracle E-Business Suite 12 implementation.The use case will use the Order Entry (schema SOE) module as the basis fordemonstrating implementing Oracle Applications. The other modules will beimplemented at a future date, and thus are not accessed during the testing. OrderEntry will have 200 active users on the system during normal business hours as theenvironment is open through the web as a B2B.As mentioned earlier, the customer user data portion of the Vision database isconfigured on a single mount point that is actually a virtual disk in a VMware virtualmachine with Oracle Enterprise Linux as the guest operating system. Drilling downinto the database VM itself, FASTDB, on the Linux OS one can use the SolutionsEnabler command symvm introduced in version 7.2 to show how the local filesystems map to the VMFS datastores and ultimately the Symmetrix. The databasedevice /dev/sdd was partitioned using fdisk into a single partition on which the ext3filesystem was created (mkfs.ext3). This mount houses the database user data.Similarly, device /dev/sde was partitioned and contains the database system files.Figure 45 demonstrates the use of the symvm command to map the local file systemto the VMFS datastore and then further to show the Symmetrix device that backs theVMFS datastore. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 56 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  57. 57. Figure 45. Using symvm to translate Linux database mounts on the FASTDB VMTo see this information at a high level, use VSI Storage Viewer as shown in Figure 46.VSI will include important details not seen with the symvm command such as theRAID configuration, thin pools, metavolume type (if applicable), and storage group. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 57 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  58. 58. Figure 46. Virtual disk mapping in the EMC VSI Storage Viewer featureViewing the path management owner of the device in VSI in Figure 46, one can see itis managed by PowerPath®. EMC PowerPath/VE was installed on all hosts for loadbalancing, failover, and high availability. It is a best practice to use PowerPath/VE ina VMware infrastructure running on EMC Symmetrix.The TDEV is not the only device bound to the thin pool SATA_Pool as shown in Figure47. Though it is not required, customers may find it is easier to manage and keeptrack of those TDEVs under FAST VP control by creating thin pools dedicated for FASTVP.In some views, VSI Storage Viewer includes a column for RAID as in Figure 46. Fordevices under FAST VP control, the algorithm that VSI uses may show the RAIDconfiguration of any of the thin pools in the policy. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 58 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  59. 59. Figure 47. Thin device bound to the pool containing SATA drivesNow that all the specific FAST VP setup activities are complete, the promotion of theOracle Applications module to a live state can begin.Order Entry applicationAs mentioned the Order Entry schema is owned by the user SOE. The total size of theSOE application is about 26 GB as shown in Figure 48. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 59 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  60. 60. Figure 48. Total size of the Order Entry applicationSwingBench was used to simulate the workload by executing those transactions thatare most common in Order Entry: adding customers, searching for products, orderingproducts, searching for orders, and processing orders. The SwingBench Order Entrybenchmark is designed to hit the majority of data in the schema.The benchmark was run for about an hour, with the default setup designed to mimican hour in a regular business day for a customer. In the screenshot shown in Figure49, the benchmark is in mid-run, with approximately 200 users connected andgenerating an average of 12,173 transactions a minute. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 60 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  61. 61. Figure 49. Order Entry benchmarkAs the parameters for FAST are set to analyze two hours’ worth of statistics (aspreviously shown in Figure 44), movement began shortly after that time. In realcustomer environments, depending on the settings used for the performance window,it is reasonable for changes to take several hours or, in some instances, days. In aproduction environment it would be most advantageous for a customer to set theperformance window to the span of time in a day during which business activity takesplace. It is important that nonproductive hours are not included in the performancewindow as this could pollute the performance statistics that the FAST controller uses,and may result in incorrect placement of data. This is a noteworthy point since unlikeFAST DP for thick devices, in FAST VP there is no choice for customers to approve oreven to review the recommendations made by the controller. If FAST determines thattracks need to be moved, and the FAST engine is set to automatic as in this casestudy (Figure 50), the moves take place automatically in the background during themove window. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 61 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  62. 62. Figure 50. FAST VP move modePer the FAST settings, about an hour after the benchmark completes, the FAST enginebegins moving tracks from the SATA_Pool thin pool to the two other configured pools,FC_Pool and EFD_Pool. Note the subtlety of how the FAST engine works. Since it isworking on the array at the sub-LUN level, there is no knowledge of the application byFAST. It simply uses the access patterns to determine where to place the data. In thismanner, the Order Entry application data ends up on three separate tiers. Figure 51catches the movement just as it is beginning. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 62 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  63. 63. Figure 51. Initial track movement for the database thin deviceAfter a time (about an hour), as seen in Figure 52, the initial movement of data iscomplete, with all three thin pools containing some portion of device 17B.Figure 52. Completed track movement for the database thin deviceIf one views the FAST VP policy in the CLI, the usage for each tier is listed. Based onhow SwingBench has accessed the user data, FAST has moved some of that data from Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 63 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  64. 64. SATA to EFD and FC. The output demonstrates that 11 GB of the Order Entry application has been re-tiered to EFD while 9 GB was placed on FC. These increases have led to the decrease of the SATA tier by the sum total of the two other tiers which is 20 GB. This is depicted in Figure 53. Figure 53. FAST policy demand usage Note also that there is still growth possible in all storage tiers, indicating that FAST could have utilized more EFD or FC but the access patterns did not warrant it. FAST VP Results Once the move is complete, the FAST VP mode is set to off to prevent additional movement during the second test since the performance and movement windows are 24 hours. The Oracle Vision database is then refreshed from a TimeFinder clone backup to ensure the post-move test is the same as the pre-test. 5 The benchmark is re-run to see if there is a noticeable difference in any of the measurable statistics. Figure 54 shows a graph of the mid-run of the benchmark-executed post-FAST VP optimizations. For each of the SwingBench runs, the loader gathers statistics on each of the five transaction types providing the minimum, maximum, and average transaction response times. These statistics are saved to an XML file at the end of each run.5 Restoring the clone data does not impact the location of the tracks on the disk tiers. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 64 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  65. 65. Figure 54. Mid-run of the Order Entry benchmarkBy simply transposing the average response times for each run on a graph, the preand post FAST VP runs can be compared. Figure 55 is a composite graph whichcontains pre and post FAST VP test results of the transaction response times for eachof the five Order Entry functions. The black lines represent the pre-FAST VPenvironment while the green represents the post-FAST VP environment. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 65 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  66. 66. Figure 55. Transaction response time comparing pre-FAST VP and post-FAST VPmovementReviewing the graph, the post-FAST VP movement environment shows clear gains overthe pre-FAST VP movement environment in every type of transaction. Sometransaction types show a more pronounced benefit, such as Browse Orders whichwent from 36 milliseconds to 23 milliseconds, but the results are undeniably betterfor each one. This test of course is just a microcosm for what is possible in a largeenterprise environment. Reduced transaction times mean more work can beaccomplished by the existing hardware and software, or that a user has a betterexperience when accessing the application or database. More importantly FAST VPwill continue to work throughout the lifecycle of the applications and databasesunder its control and up-tier or down-tier according to how that data is accessed,efficiently making use of the storage within the FAST VP policy.FAST VP, manual tiering, and real-world considerationsNavigating the varied applications and databases in a customer environment in orderto manually tier them across different disk technologies is a difficult task. Ifresources are at a premium it moves from difficult to near impossible. An applicationor database is not a single entity. Invariably there will be some data more heavilyaccessed than other data, and thus placing an entire application or database on asingle disk technology will either waste money (FC, EFD) or limit performance (SATA).If all those applications and databases were static entities with the sameperformance requirements, it might be a more feasible undertaking to manually tierthem; but they are not. They are living; or rather they have a lifecycle to them. Thesimple Order Entry use case conducted for this paper is evidence of that.At the end of the test, despite its nominal size, the Order Entry application is nowspread across three tiers of storage, with the most heavily accessed data being Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 66 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876
  67. 67. placed on EFD, the second on Fibre Channel, and the least or not at all remaining onSATA. All three tiers are utilized based upon how the data was accessed during thetest and most importantly no manual tiering was required to achieve the result. FASTVP took over the tiering of the application or database in this case, and did so usingreal-time disk metrics. Unlike a manual tiering which may be a single event, FAST VPwill continue to gather metrics and make additional changes over the lifecycle of theapplication thereby mitigating cost and maximizing performance.ConclusionUsing Virtual LUN and FAST VP technologies from EMC it is possible to properly tierapplications running in a vSphere environment, without the complications of manyvirtual disks on many datastores or the use of raw device mappings. All the benefitsof storage tiering in an EMC Symmetrix VMAX and VMware vSphere infrastructure caneven be achieved using a single datastore on a single thin LUN, sacrificing neithermanageability nor performance. Data movement can be completely automated,eliminating the need for time-consuming analysis by database and IT staff. As onlywhat is necessary of each tier of disk is used and as most data in large databasessupporting various applications is not frequently accessed, the majority can remainon cost-effective SATA. These benefits make FAST a wise investment for anycompany. Storage Tiering for VMware Environments Deployed on 67 EMC Symmetrix VMAX with Enginuity 5876

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